Category: Precision Health

Create Healthcare Customers for Life with Carina Edwards, Sr. Vice President, Customer Experience at Imprivata

Hey Outcomes Rocket friends, thanks for tuning in to the podcast once again. As a leader in health care, you have big ideas, great products, a story to tell, and are looking for ways to improve your reach and scale your business. However there's one tiny problem. Health care is tough to navigate and the typical sales cycle is slow. That's why you should consider starting your own podcast as part of your sales and marketing strategy. At the Outcomes Rocket, I've been able to reach thousands of people every single month that I wouldn't have otherwise been able to reach if I had not started my podcast. Having this organic reach enables me to get the feedback necessary to create a podcast that delivers value that you are looking for. And the same thing goes if you start a podcast for what you could learn from your customers. The best thing about podcasting in healthcare is that we are currently at the ground level, meaning that the number of people in healthcare listening to podcasts is small but growing rapidly. I put together a free checklist for you to check out the steps on what it takes to create your own podcast. You could find that at outcomesrocket.health/podcast. Check it out today and find a new way to leverage the sales, marketing and outcomes of your business. That's outcomesrocket.health/podcast.

Welcome back once again to the Outcomes Rocket podcast where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health leaders. Today I have the outstanding Carina Edwards. She's a Senior Vice President of Customer Experience at Imprivatato. Carina is responsible for all customer facing operations that fuel customer success including Worldwide Professional Services, Worldwide Customer Service Support and Advocacy, Business Development and Corporate I.T. She brings 22 years of experience in health care technology which many of you have a keen interest in. This health care technology space is a growing one. And with that it's important that we hone in deeper and share best practices with our peers and Carina has a wealth of knowledge and experience here. She got to focus on speed to transformation brings a strong track record of helping companies realize their next stages of growth and creating customers for life. It's a pleasure to have Carina on the podcast. Then Carina I want to just open up the mic to you to fill in the gaps of that intro. Welcome to the podcast.

Thank you so much for that. And I guess the other thing I would add is I'm not really an avid golfer and a foodie and I really enjoy all aspects of life and I health care industries industry especially healthcare technology once you did it you never leave and that passion really seen the outcomes for us. I think all the last minute long term partnerships. I'm excited to be here and excited to share some of the stories with you.

Now that's really awesome, Carina. Thanks for sharing that personal note. Sounds like you enjoy the outdoors as well. And that's a, it's important to get out there and get our minds away from this hectic health care to keep our Saussure.

Absolutely.

So what got you into the medical sector to begin with?

So I like to say I was very lucky my first job out of school I was actually asked to deploy the avalanche or get assistance to needy hospitals around the globe. And believe me one great way to see the world actually be doctors and nurses and from care for horses and empath and technology have doctors make it easier for them to do their job, easier for them to care for their patients. Great to see real time and that really suffer from there all that role they never taken and kept me and really looking at how technology can enable RY technology will better evidence at this point to care better care providers and better care quality for patients. So it's really been a lifetime mission and I love the health care sector.

What a great kickoff to that career and giving back to our military. So it sounds like that left an imprint on you. And it's interesting to see how how leaders form, shape, develop. So I'm very curious Carina you've been in this field for quite some time now. Today, what would you say that one thing that needs to be at the forefront of every health care leaders agenda?

So I think the mission hasn't changed. I think the nation has continued to evolve where it's all about the right information at the right time innovations. And it's really about improving the quality of care for patients. Yet that has done so in an ecosystem today that is so challenging. You know we have massive cybersecurity threats we have all of these compliance and regulatory needs that we have to meet. And so right now at every leader's agenda is how do I make sure that my clinicians have access to the right information quickly? We get this the right access at the right level because we're trying to make sure that they can access the information they need but not over communicate information. Not once, everyone wants to see you have information.I think the key for us and accessing your security organization. I think I'm more acutely aware but I think top 3 agenda for all CIO's is have they yet evaluated the EMR vendors in place. Theay have their ring fenced, their world and really have that cyber security perimeter to protect that information. And yet how in the world do they get access to it at that point. And that's why this is.

So can you give us some examples of how your organization has created results in this space?

Sure. In the court saying that everybody is known for or known for having a product on one side and what it does is it really is that from to health care I.T. systems it allows providers to use their building badge and their pen to tap into a workstation pulls out realizes with the help of regulations doctors and nurses are tapping in 45 to 5 times a day. And so when you have to continue to access the information but yet you have to shut it down every time they walk away. Health care is a whole and so our solutions say explanations 45 minutes per use everyday.

That's huge.

Yeah we also talked about that clinical workflow and what I'll get in here is the other piece that we're seeing great surgeons on this are facing the opioid epidemic is eprescribing a controlled substance as one tool in the arsenal to start combating opioid, a prescription abuse. It's this ability for the provider to eprescribe with certainty that they are the provider. This is the right prescription and they do that biometrically or they do that with multifactor authentication and we have a great customer guide singer who literally seeing those statistics where in the first month they say it a million and a half hours solution but even better they reduce their prescribing rates. They actually have improved the patient experiences is no more likely to come in and get that prescription because these are people that really need those medications.

Right.

Its reduced to fraud. And so we're seeing how areas really help with this massive appetite.

And so at the interface of this eprescription, what exactly is it that makes it effective?

So what makes it really effective is the workflow side. Traditionally I think every listener can understand this. Imagine that you're going to your bank alive and see your bag and then all of a sudden you have to go find yourself cellphone because you saved the code and you have to go to find the code, yes then type them into your compute?

Yes.

Okay. So now imagine doing that before we prescribe cellphoe.

Yeah it's insane.

So instead the way we've architected the solution by meeting our requirements is when they're in their EMR system and they prescribe that narcotic. We have a soft token on their own and they use that multifactor to ensure that he is using a password plus token and the unique thing or are they using fingerprints. And it hasn't. You know. And so when you do that then when the right clinical workflow. We now have a hands free option. So after you say that your fingerprints, the computer wakes up your phone, it calls that code automatically. You don't have to actually go and grab it. I'd love to catch up with that token right into that prescribing Latvala prescription. And that's why is aware what the doctor has so that they know they have to follow them and get handsfree pin and now ask them for another form factor. So it's very adaptive.

That's very interesting. And it sounds like it's making a difference especially in this opioid epidemic. And as we speak about technologies like this I think it's always interesting to talk about what the road for approval for things like these are you know we're in a space that is highly regulated by the FDA but at the same time there's devices and things like that that don't have to go through that rigor. Can you tell us a little bit more about what that typical regulatory pathway for you guys is?

For us. You know we really back to we sit on that framework. So...

Okay.

Security at all of the points of digital identity and how to have that like entity trusted by the end source. So whether it be the authentication to the endpoint, the actual machine that they're logging into or the mobile device they're logging into whether it be single sign on to all the different applications to eliminate passwords and health care? There will be transacting like this controlled substance workflow. So we look at the regulations as a framework to build our technology around it and that critical workflow. So it's really less about our solutions being regulated and really more looking at the guidelines. The DEA in particular has a wonderful framework for prescribing and controlled substances and they marry that to the next standards guidelines for security. And so by leveraging those two frameworks you can build solutions that fit right into the ecosystem around the workflow. Thinking about that end user.

Fascinating and folks password fatigue is real and the solutions that Carina is talking to us about. At Imprivata they're really taking it a step further and going to where the puck is going with the way that they do these identity verifications. And I love the approach that you guys have taken here. If the listeners wanted to learn more about your company or the solutions that you provide, what would be the site or place that they should visit?

Oh sure yeah they can visit us imprivata.com a lot of great video clips, library testimonials, a lot of great customer stories so great place to go for information. We have a great YouTube channel. So lots of different ways.

Nice. Awesome. There you have folks imprivata.com. Check them out. Also put a link there in the podcast show notes so that you could go to this episode and check that out. So Carina, can you share with us a time when you had a setback something that you learned so much from that you always do today?

Sure yeah. Just wanted to think about. For me it really comes down to connecting with employees and really aligned, aligning myself to their growth and aligning them to the mission. So one of the things I learned from was I was surprised that three years ago one of my direct reports abruptly quit and it really came as a shock and I kind of...

Yeah.

I listened to the reason and I couldn't believe I miss it and that it was positive reason why he was leaving, he was planning on taking another step and do a start-up again and having some fun. When I missed for those signals? And so what its made me do is really then reconnect with employees at a different level. The first thing I always try to do is understand, what are their career goals? What excites about their job? How are they contributing to the mission and always tying their jobs to the broader vision? And the exciting part of that story was you know a year and a half is this person's journey. They actually wound up coming back to the company...

Oh really.

I found out that they were in love with their travel and the startup wasn't exactly what they wanted to be in. So back to now understanding where they want to go I was able to kind of reconnect with them and say hey there is no bridge burned but you said you're so wonderful and you break through this we'd love to have you back. And so it was really wonderful to see him rejoin your organization now be a great leader and continue to grow. And so it's how you learn from these mistakes and I think if we're not learning we're dying and...

Absolutely.

Taking the time for feedback and coaching and listening which in today's hectic schedule it's really difficult to do.

It really is Carina and that's a great call out because it's hard to stay focused on the mission, your customer focuse, you're trying to get things done. It's easy to forget your people. And I think this is such a great call out any tips that you'd recommend for people to do to stay in tune.

Yeah you know one of the things that I believe in multi layers of communication in different ways to connect with your teams. Your mighty heroes growing from 45 now over 150 and across the globe. You have to do a few things. First, you have to empower your leaders information right. Transparency is key. Second thing is you have to have a case that connects the employees and it's not just about you know the one on ones. You can't scale yourself holistically all the time.

Right.

Thinking about how do you connect? How do you share their successes? How do you communicate? And so here, we do a series across the year in person face to faces, whereabouts meetings, customer highlights,such stories we let people brag about other people's accomplishments. And that really gets people engaged in the mission because it really is reconnecting all the time. Why are you here? How does your role connect with our mission? How has your role helped you succeed long term your career objectives? So it's having that dual view of the employee that's critical.

Love that. Love that. So important. And as we look to implement positive change in health care and continue the good things that are being done there's a lot of great things happening. It's important that we engage our people I know even on the provider side. I mean you guys providers listening to this. It's tough, it's busy, it's hard to connect so a great message shared by Carina there. I would definitely hit the rewind button right down some of these ideas because it is definitely some good stuff. What would you say one of your proudest leadership experiences to date is Carina?

It's actually today it's here in Imprivata, one of the things...

Really.

We started this journey and we the, I join in 2012 and the company year was from a horizontal company to a health care company. And really doubling down on our understanding of the clinical workflow and the knowledge. I'm not sure all of our customers came with us on that journey. And so we created a mantra,"Create customers for life."And it's something that we lead not just in my organization it's lives by the entire company. It's part of the four cultural tendons that we had. So as an Imprivata employee, customers's like is the hot thing we are focused on. And with that we asked all employees to bring their passion their deep integrity and their courage of convictions to bear when they're actually delivering for our customers and deliverance solutions. And that resulted in 99% customer retention that...

Wow

Best in class. We're very proud of our partnerships. I spend a lot of my time on the road with customers listening, understanding how we can be better, consistently innovating their experience to make sure that we don't fall behind that we're always leading to that mission. And it's a two way street. We're giving and we're providing in that partnership is really exciting. And so I'm actually speaking with Jackrabbit to I think our time I see session coming up about creating...

Very cool.

Partnerships and thinking through how those frameworks are kept partnered with everybody but you can help customers be successful.

That is very inspiring Carina and customers for life. What a great focus to have and principle to run your company with. It's so easy to just go quarter per quarter or even contract to contract right. Like K.M. we're in this for another three years celebrate. And it's I think many companies are guilty of this. Customers For Life is a very inspiring message. And with 99 % retention you guys are definitely living what you preach.

It's exciting and it's an exciting journey and one that continues. I think what we're going is we're sending customers up for long term success. At the end of the day that's what it's all about right. We're all in this industry not because the technology is as sexy as not because it's the most fast moving but at the end of the day there's a patient connected to all this information is there where we want to make sure that we get all of the care and the outcomes better and lower the cost of care and we're doing it well. So we're all in the ecosystem and how do we continue to get back.

Yeah and Carina you know the other thing that's really interesting is this decision that you all made as a business to say we're going to focus strictly on health care. That right there was a move that maybe I'd like to learn a little bit more here. What went on behind that decision and that commitment because that's a big decision?

Yeah it is I think when you when when companies face these milestones we see a trend emerge if you love your business and you kind of say what's delivering the most value? Where can we continue to deliver value? Because if you're not delivering value and your delivering technology, it's short lived.

It is.

It's nice it could be sexy but it's not sustainable.

Right.

Esaw as a company was this problem occurred across all industries. Pastor refugees real everywhere security...

Yes.

However the uniqueness is the health care and the healthcare workflow really made it vertical that we could go much deeper and change the practice aligning to the current model. So imagine your merged department. You see in their hectic,they're chaotic, they have computers kind of sprinkled throughout the area, and you have this hummingbird station of people have to get in and out of records and information real time to get that information about the patients. And so we saw that was very neat was how do we facilitate that task users sweat. How do we think about changing the user from the doctor to the nurse in the record so they can charge accordingly? So with all those uniqueness is we thought that we had something differentiated and our ecosystem partners the EMR vendors, the virtualization vendors, the end point vendors. It really led us to figure out and deliver value here to get that 45 minutes back retain those providers. And that's where we saw the momentum and that value creation was the strongest was a turning point.

That is so interesting and it's a big commitment and one that really kind of the message to the listeners is listen to Carina's talk here if you're not delivering value and just technology you better take another look at it because it's short lived. So Carina tell us about an exciting project or focus that you're working on at Imprivata today.

Oh goodness. So there's so many things going on. I think the most longer term view is patient identity and this notion of digital identity across the spectrum of clinical side as well as the patient side. If you think about your own life today, we have many different forms of identification. Like we might have a driver's license and I have a passport, we have some security number. At the same time your digital ID is something very different. Some people like to lie with their Facebook account,to their LinkedIn accounts or other forms that say this is who I am. And when we think about that evolution for patients wouldn't it be amazing if I was at home I could truly validate my identity with that I could actually tell you all my entitlements. And now when you're doing it tell it help or you're checking into your care scheduling your appointment. The organization had certainty of who I was, and if you're going to share my information like any of those attributes whether it may be biometric, digital footprints, second bank tokens, that followed me along the path same for clinicians, Like when clinicians come into an organization they go through that full credentialing stage, their prevision, our user identity in the system and then from there they are given access to all these different systems. What about a provider in Massachusetts actually in Boston I could be delivering care medical center at US partners. And so now I have to redo that this identity is read from the same three different providers and truly I just want. Our vision is all about how do we create digital trust in that identity and bridge that identity across the ecosystem of followers whether it be your fingerprint your visual ID you're using password all those digital attributes and that level of security so that it's a project that we're really excited about something that's coming together today as we evolve a lot more to come a lot of players getting in these days.

Yeah it's very interesting and the promise that it holds for outcomes improvement is also huge.

Absolutely, and that's a streamlined streamlines back to it gives time...

It does.

Why should they wait three to five days to the provision of the systems when I can actually do provisioning right. Day one trust identity what your role is in our system.

Yeah I mean that's fascinating. Folks, again we have 30 minutes on these podcasts. And when you have amazing folks like Carina you just want to stay on here for a full hour. So we're getting close to the end here. Carina let's pretend you and I are building a medical leadership course on what it takes to be successful in the business of I.T. in medicine. This is the one on one of Carina. So we're going to write out a syllabus with a lightning round. It's four questions followed by a book that you recommend to the listener. You ready?

Okay, sure I'm ready.

Alright. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes?

Every decision be patient centered and give education to the patient in the flow of their journey.

What is the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid?

Growing technology at a problem. It's about the clinical experience clinical RY and the clinical workflow and so if you don't integrate into that, your technology solution will fail.

How do you stay relevant despite constant change?

Listen. Listening is critical. Hearing feedback, understanding the environment, seeing the ecosystem changes and adapting so you can scale and grow.

What is the one area focus that drives everything in your company?

Customers For Life.

I love that.

It's about building those partnerships and delivering solutions that meet the needs of the providers and users and their patients.

Customers for life. And what book would you recommend to the listeners Carina.

So the favorite book I can recommend that I read recently is called the Captain Class by Sam Walker really talks about the attributes of leaders and leadership by studying all of the high performing teams that are out there in professional sports.

Fascinating and it's called the Captain Class?

Yeah the Captain Class.

Wow, fascinating. Folks, you could find this lightning round syllabus along with the book. Just go to outcomesrocket.health/imprivata and you're going to find all of that there are links to the company as well as an entire transcript of my conversation here with Carina. Before we conclude Carina I'd love if you could just share a closing thought and then the best place for the listeners to get in touch with you.

Great, my closing thought for everyone listening is clearly you're all on this leadership journey. First and foremost employees matter. Connecting with them and driving them through the vision matters. And yet most importantly delivering value to customers matter. And so if you crack those two, you'll be ultimately successful, am really excited to have been part of this and listeners always connect and come with me or on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Outstanding. This has been inspirational and we really appreciate you making time for us. Thanks Carina.

This is great. Thank you so much.

Hey Outcomes Rocket friends, thanks for tuning in to the podcast once again. As a leader in health care, you have big ideas, great products, a story to tell, and are looking for ways to improve your reach and scale your business. However there's one tiny problem. Health care is tough to navigate and the typical sales cycle is slow. That's why you should consider starting your own podcast as part of your sales and marketing strategy. At the Outcomes Rocket, I've been able to reach thousands of people every single month that I wouldn't have otherwise been able to reach if I had not started my podcast. Having this organic reach enables me to get the feedback necessary to create a podcast that delivers value that you are looking for. And the same thing goes if you start a podcast for what you could learn from your customers. The best thing about podcasting in healthcare is that we are currently at the ground level, meaning that the number of people in healthcare listening to podcasts is small but growing rapidly. I put together a free checklist for you to check out the steps on what it takes to create your own podcast. You could find that at outcomesrocket.health/podcast. Check it out today and find a new way to leverage the sales, marketing and outcomes of your business. That's outcomesrocket.health/podcast.

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How to Operationalize Personalized Medicine with Dr. Karen Sutton, Orthopaedic Surgeon at Hospital for Special Surgery

Hey Outcomes Rocket friends, thanks for tuning in to the podcast once again. As a leader in health care, you have big ideas great products, a story to tell, and are looking for ways to improve your reach and scale your business. However there's one tiny problem. Health care is tough to navigate and the typical sales cycle is low. That's why you should consider starting your own podcast as part of your sales and marketing strategy. At the Outcomes Rocket, I've been able to reach thousands of people every single month that I wouldn't have otherwise been able to reach if I had not started my podcast. Having this organic reach enables me to get the feedback necessary to create a podcast that delivers value that you are looking for. And the same thing goes if you start a podcast for what you could learn from your customers. The best thing about podcasting in healthcare is that we are currently at the ground level, meaning that the number of people in healthcare listening to podcasts is small but growing rapidly. I put together a free checklist for you to check out the steps on what it takes to create your own podcast. You could find that at outcomesrocket.health/podcast. Check it out today and find a new way to leverage the sales, marketing and outcomes of your business. That's outcomesrocket.health/podcast.

Welcome back once again to the outcomes rocket podcast where we chat with the day's most successful and inspiring health leaders. Today I have a wonderful guest for you. Her name is Dr. Karen Sutton. She's an orthopedic surgery at a hospital for special surgery. She's got a lot of different hats. She's also an associate professor at Cornell Medical School. She's the head team physician for the U.S. lacrosse team the ladies team. She's a chief medical officer at the International federal lacrosse organization. She's a researcher, a mom of four, has worked with Peewee athletes all the way to the Boston Red Sox and Bruins. This lady is moving and shaking in health care and it's a pleasure to have her on the podcast. I want to give you a warm welcome, Karen. Thanks for joining us.

Thank you for having me.

It is a pleasure. So tell me is there anything that I missed in your intro that you want to tell the listeners about?

That one thing just to exaggerate on the position now with chief medical officer for the Federation of International across we're looking towards making lacrosse a more international and hopefully Olympic sport. So I really had the privilege to hit the ground running with that quest for the sport of lacrosse.

Outstanding Yeah I mean it definitely is a sport. Not sure why it's not in the Olympics yet. So I think it's a great endeavor for you. What's the...

We're moving it forward.

What would you say that time to make it happen is?

We're hoping maybe 2028 where the Olympics are going to be in Los Angeles. That's what we're shooting for.

Ah that would be awesome. That would be amazing.

Yeah I'd be thrilled.

Definitely wish you the best in those efforts and they pick the right woman for the job.

Thanks I appreciate it.

Absolutely. So Karen tell me a little bit about what got you into medicine to begin with.

Probably started from working with my dad when I was little and just learning to write. He was doing EKG and reviewing them as a cardiologist and I used to follow his lead and pretend to copy his writing even though not one word was eligible. From my standpoint I thought I was doing a good job as a junior cardiologist then.

Nice.

I followed the lead going into college where I majored in chemistry with a focus in biochemistry and enjoyed the research aspect of that. I started shadowing some doctors especially my father wanted me to shadow women surgeons to understand what the lifestyle is as a female versus male surgeon in the field because it's a lot more balancing from my perspective for sure. Then when I got into medical school I shadowed and mentored with an orthopedic surgeon named Dr. Morman who at the time was the team surgeon for the Ravens. So he was fantastic we wrote lacross research papers together. He really motivated me into the field of orthopedic surgery. And despite the fact that he was probably 6"5 and a few pounds heavier than I was he was convinced that orthopedic surgery was the way I should go. And I followed his take on that.

I love it. So it's just amazing right. I mean the influence that our mentors have growing in this field and fast forward to today. Sure he's very proud. Him and your father for all the things that you've done and so now you're here. Dr. Sutton what would you say a hot topic that needs to be an every medical leaders agenda today and how are you all approaching that?

I think a hot topic compared to maybe a decade or two ago is personalized medicine for patients. We're getting all of these data points on people whether it's genetic advanced imaging being able to put a puzzle piece together a lot better than we have in the past. The other thing is partnering with a lot of these wearable devices where we can get in real time what especially athletes are doing what's their average heart rate. How much are they exercising. You can even have them track their calories so you can get the energy they're using and the energy they're putting out and tailor some of your treatment to that scale.

Yeah that's a really really neat approach Kiran and you know we recently just did an interview with Keith. He's over at LRV Capital. He was talking about the digital front door of health care. And you know much like you mentioned this consumerism approach is definitely becoming the focus. Give us an example of how you and your practice or one of the organizations that you're part of have have enabled this.

One organization I work with so I used to work with the Yale athletes and we found a lot of stress fractures were happening on one of the teens with female athletes. So we needed to get some feedback in terms of how they were eating what were they doing on the field. And some of the trainers were able to track some of their nutrition and we realized that in terms of availability for their nutrition after practice there were limited resources so we start to get an odd blip in terms of what they were eating after practice and certainly stress fractures multifactorial. But if we can control at least the energy that they're taking in it will help to prevent progression have a stress fracture or even a stress fracture from starting. So we were actually able to work with the university to determine more cafeteria's more options for the athletes to eat after practice. And that was one way of dealing with just tracking nutrition and then how you can impact change after that.

That's pretty cool. So a lot of it came from what the girls were eating. So what were the results after they sort of changed their eating?

So looking at both eating as well as footwear I think that we noticed that they needed to have a lot more footwear options on the field you can't just wear cleats throughout her versus grass versus artificial turf as well. And everything has a different length and needs a different grip with the cleat. So once we changed cleats and then nutrition started to see a trend to where certainly decreased incidence of stress fractures.

That's awesome. Congratulations on making those tweaks to help the players be healthier and more productive on the field. That's a big win.

Yeah it's nice. It's always good when organizations who are very responsive to changes that need to happen.

Absolutely. Now tell us a time when things didn't work out something that you experienced a setback and what you learned from that.

The first thing that comes to mind is going from middle school and then playing volleyball in high school. One of the coaches of the volleyball team asked our gym teacher in middle school who are the best athletes who do you think could be recruited to play volleyball. So freshman year I went for the volleyball team made it and it just didn't seem to be my forte. I was setting which I did a fairly good job at but I had to take a step back and really assess my strengths and weaknesses because I felt like I wasn't really progressing as a volleyball player. One thing I do in many aspects of my life is try to get a 360 degree view of what's going on so I talked to the coach, I talked to the players. I just looked at different training techniques and I started realizing I'm much more of a sprinting athlete on the field pivoting cutting athlete. And so I was talking to some of the other coaches and then ended up switching over to field hockey. So I think a lot of us have to delve deep within ourselves and decide Is this the path that we're going down. How do you make the most of your talents as well and looking in life especially as you're driving your career even as you're driving your recreational activities making sure that you have those efficiencies that you're doing.

Karen, what a great example. And I think this is one thing that that applies as much on the field as to people's careers and businesses. And it's hard to make those decisions that hey you know what I've got to change what I'm doing. What kind of advice would you offer to the folks listening that are maybe in the middle of something that they know deep down inside. Hey you know I'm maybe not the best at is. How do they peeve it.

I think one thing is to take a step back. So we all want to just keep going going going and move forward and make a change possibly an irrational decision. So it's always important to have a quiet space. Start keeping a journal and I learned from Oprah always that we need to write down our immediate goals our short term our long term goals and our lifetime goals and start deciding is your life at that time really lining up with how those goals are forming. Fortunately and unfortunately I guess those changed throughout our life where your goal when you're 20 is definitely going to be different than your goal when you're 40. So one thing when I started out as a surgeon in your first couple years you're not as busy clinically so I had a few friends tell me words of advice to start sitting down and decide where you want to go with your career as a surgeon. One thing I always wanted to do was get back to the sport of lacrosse so I started looking into the options for being a team physician for the United States. And I talked to some of my connections and got some feedback how to get to that pathway. Then I reached out to us lacrosse and they ended up having a under 19 team that was going to Germany. And they asked if I would be willing and able to serve as the team physician for that team and I certainly jumped at the chance and have gone forward ever since with them.

That's awesome. What a great step by step process that you laid out here for the listeners Dr. Sutton and I think it's something that we definitely need to do more of. We tend to want to go go go without having to take a step back and step back getting clarity and like Karen said writing out your clear objectives will definitely help you navigate the system a lot better as well as your career. Tell us a little bit more about a time that you are the most proud of Karen something that happened in your medical leadership experience to date.

One thing was probably joining the hospital for special surgery staff Hospital for Special Surgery is the number one orthopedic hospital in the country. And I always thought in the back of my mind that it was someplace that I wanted to be they just really focus on patient care. It's an amazing experience when somebody walks in the door there from the person who greets you to the person who's walking into the operating room to of course the surgeon and the supporting staff around you. One of my mentors virtually I think she knows it now but she didn't know it back in the day because I was always following what she was doing with Dr. Joe Hannifin. She's a leader in the field of women's sports medicine and she was conducting all this research on ACL injury on female athletes she was the first to start a women's sports medicine program and she actually reached out to me last July and asked if I would join the HSA staff. And of course when you're mentor or your virtual mentor asks you to do that. It was something that I was extremely thrilled about and then to be able to be in the same building with her and pick her brain about different things that she's done and how she's treated athletes has really been a privilege for me.

That's so awesome. Karen and I just got goosebumps when I heard that. It's so cool to just kind of have that path be opened up for you. And just by being clear being intentional and working through it now you're here you're doing some amazing things at HSA as with what you're doing with the lacrosse team all the things that you're working on. What would you say one exciting project you're most excited about?

One thing that everybody's surprised that an orthopedic surgeon would do is I work on frozen shoulder and breast cancer patients. I started noticing early in my career that frozen shoulder was occurring in these patients who did not have the usual risk factors. Typically we see an association with diabetes a severe trauma or even a thyroid disorder. But these patients weren't checking any of those boxes. So looking into it and then talking to my colleagues who are also treat shoulder injuries I said Have you noticed anything with breast cancer patients in frozen shoulder. And then they picked a few patients that came to mind and I started looking reviewing my charts and they were all on a certain medication these aromatase inhibitors. Interesting in the back of my mind I started hypothesizing that potentially the aromatase inhibitor was causing some sort of increased fibrosis in the shoulder capsule and maybe that was causing them to have frozen shoulder. So I worked with a breast cancer nurse and we started doing first some background research on it and then clinical research to see where the association lies. Is it from the breast cancer surgery is it from the radiation the Axler or no dissection or could it be from this chemotherapeutic agent that these patients have to take.

That is fascinating. So it sounds like this is a project that is live and you guys are digging in.

Right. Right now we're looking more at the imaging behind it so trying to compare some of the breast cancer patients who are on a robot inhibitors to the more typical frozen shoulder patients such as the diabetic patient and seeing what the differences are there. And the main point behind it is people are living a lot longer with cancer and knock on wood hopefully doing a lot better with cancer. So not only do we want them to be in remission for their cancer and hopefully fully treated but during that time it's important to be active and have a wonderful lifestyle during that time too. So if a frozen shoulder is really aggravating somebody and they can't play with their grandchildren swim do their usual activities. I think that's still a key aspect to their lives.

That's such a great call out. And folks if you're listening to this and Dr. Suttons work sparks an interest or maybe an idea that you've had by all means at the end of the podcast here we're going to give you a place to reach out and collaborate on this project that she's working on. Dr. Sutton, let's pretend you and I are building medical leadership course on what it takes to be successful in medicine today. It's the 101 of Dr. Karen Sutton. We've got a syllabus we're going to build for the listeners lightning round style for questions followed by a book that you recommend to the listeners. You ready?

Ready.

Awesome. What's the best way to improve health care outcomes?

Avoid subjective measurements and try to get objective measurements as much as you can whether it's outcome scores wearable devices. Really get that feedback from the patient that doesn't just come from subjective discussions.

Love it. What's the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid?

Biggest pitfall is jumping to conclusions and seeing something from the surface without delving into the details of the subject or the issue at hand.

How do you stay relevant as a healthcare organization despite constant change?

I think it's important to look from a global perspective. So really getting yourself involved with international associations national associations getting out there and going to meetings whether that's virtually going or going in person and trying to challenge yourself by presenting your own research. And it really pushes you to drive change in your field.

Love that. And what's one area of focus that should drive everything in a health organization.

Patient satisfaction. I think we try to overthink all of these different ways. How should we make that are prettier or should we have better lives. Should the MRI work a little bit faster. But no matter what the goals for all of those achievements should be patient satisfaction.

Love that what book would you recommend to the listeners, Karen?

SO as a female orthopedic surgeon and there are only about 4 to 6 percent of us in the field as well as a mother of four. The Balance Project book is the first that comes to mind. The balance project is a book written by Susie Schnall and she did some background research in terms of interviewing professional women who are also mothers. And she went through a series of questions to see how do we actually get through the day. How can we balance parts of our lives or how don't we balance parts of our lives and then that segues into her book it says a fictional book too about how this woman balances her being a mother as well as a professional woman.

Outstanding. And as I've said before I do believe that it's going to take more women leaders in health care to make health care better. So check out that balance project folks. Great recommendation by Dr. Sutton here. Everything that we've discussed today including a transcript shows notes as links to the things that we've discussed these books are available. Go to outcomesrocket.health/Sutton You're going to find all that there. KAREN This has been so much fun. We've really talked about some really cool things improving outcomes and just staying focused. Can you share a closing thought with our listeners and then the best place where they can get in touch with you.

Sure. I would say one of my favorite quotes is look a challenge straight in the eye and give it a wink. I think that's always finding where you see this huge mountain that you need to climb over. But take it passed by path and if it has to be a windy trail then that's OK. People can reach me at Twitter @KSutt001 Instagram KarenSuttonMD. as well as at Hospital for Special Surgery You can look me up on their website.

Outstanding. Karen, has been fun listeners look at your challenge and give it a wink. Well great words to be left with here. This has been so much fun Dr. Sutton really appreciate you carving out time for us and looking forward to seeing what you do about these women Olympics the lacrosse team so we'll be staying in touch with these soon. Thanks for joining us.

Excellent thank you.

Hey Outcomes Rocket friends, thanks for tuning in to the podcast once again. As a leader in health care, you have big ideas great products, a story to tell, and are looking for ways to improve your reach and scale your business. However there's one tiny problem. Health care is tough to navigate and the typical sales cycle is low. That's why you should consider starting your own podcast as part of your sales and marketing strategy. At the Outcomes Rocket, I've been able to reach thousands of people every single month that I wouldn't have otherwise been able to reach if I had not started my podcast. Having this organic reach enables me to get the feedback necessary to create a podcast that delivers value that you are looking for. And the same thing goes if you start a podcast for what you could learn from your customers. The best thing about podcasting in healthcare is that we are currently at the ground level, meaning that the number of people in healthcare listening to podcasts is small but growing rapidly. I put together a free checklist for you to check out the steps on what it takes to create your own podcast. You could find that at outcomesrocket.health/podcast. Check it out today and find a new way to leverage the sales, marketing and outcomes of your business. That's outcomesrocket.health/podcast.

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Recommended Book:

The Balance Project: A Novel

Best Way to Contact Karen:

@KarenSuttonMD

@ksutt001

Mentioned Link:

https://www.hss.edu/

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