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How Automation is Adding Value in Healthcare
Episode 378

Matt Seefeld, Executive Vice President at MedEvolve, Inc.

How Automation is Adding Value in Healthcare

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How Automation is Adding Value in Healthcare

Episode 378

Recommended Book:

Built to Last

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mattseefeld@medevolve.com

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How Automation is Adding Value in Healthcare with Matt Seefeld, Executive Vice President at MedEvolve, Inc. | Convert audio-to-text with Sonix

Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring health care leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the podcast. Saul Marquez here, today have the privilege of hosting Matt Seefeld. He’s the executive vice president at MedEvolve. He has over 17 years of management consulting experience in the healthcare industry. He’s got extensive expertise in the assessment, design and implementation of process improvement programs and technology development across the entire revenue cycle. That’s a sweet spot. Matt began his career with Stockamp and Associates Inc. and worked for both PricewaterhouseCoopers and Deloitte Consulting in their Healthcare and Life Sciences practice lines. In 2007, he developed the Business Intelligence Solution and founded Inter Point Partners, where he served as chairman and chief executive officer. In 2011, he sold his business to Streamline Health Solutions. He then served as chief strategist of Revenue Cycle, followed by senior vice president of Solutions and Strategy until 2014. Recently, Matt ran global sales for NantHealth and provided consulting services for health, technology and service businesses nationwide. Prior to joining MedEvolve full time, he completed his undergrad at the University of California in San Diego, where he now resides and works. So with that introduction, I wanted to bring Matt onto the podcast and have him fill in any of the gaps of the intro that I may have missed. Matt, welcome.

Matt Seefeld:
Hey, Saul. Good to be here for sure. I think you did a pretty good job. You allowed me to reminisce on my my career. But do you think you know that I started and revenue cycle right out of college with a boutique firm stock up and associates as really became the market leader and revenue cycle. And you got really interested in data analytics and workflow automation around 2005 and 2006, which led me to start Interpoint and I really haven’t looked back. You know, I think that my focus has now been on how we leverage technology to deliver better services for the healthcare industry, to really focus on financial outcomes, really focus on improving efficiencies through technology for physician groups and hospital and all systems across the U.S.

Saul Marquez:
And I think it’s a fantastic focus, Matt, and a good friend of mine, he always said and he was the executive at several provider institutions, he said to me, Saul, without margin, there is no mission. So what we’re going to focus on today is that margin that allows us to drive our mission in healthcare. We’re gonna be focused on financial outcomes and the work that Matt and his team does at MedEvolve. And so I love to hear from you, Matt, what you feel a hot topic is within this this economic outcomes sector that everybody needs to be focused on.

Matt Seefeld:
Yeah, I think I think what we first of all, I love the margin comment you made because that is true. You know, we talk about delivering a service to the U.S. healthcare market, which, by the way, we are all participants. And if you’ve been to a doctor visit the last six or twelve months, your experience in health care firsthand, the challenge is if there is no margin out there, there’s no more investment. There’s no more investment in products or services to improve our overall health. And where does our margin come from? That comes from working with the insurance companies get paid for the services you deliver. Now, in 2019, it’s coming a lot from collecting from the consumers on the debt that they owe you, which we’ll talk, I’m sure, a little bit more about throughout the podcast. But to me, that financial outcome no longer, you know, the old days you could throw people at problems and that was okay because the margins were good. We had a lot of fee for service contracts. Reimbursements were really solid. We are recovering our costs. No problem. That world is gone. I mean, it is gone and it’s getting worse. And frankly, the ambiguity of the 2020 election and what’s going to happen with Obamacare potentially and has other value based service arrangements is scary. It’s scary to providers and scary to vendors like us. So what we’re doing here at MedEvolve, which is really where I’ve spent so much of my career, is how do I reduce the cost to collect the insurance receivable and the patient receivable. Not by throwing people out by innovation and workflow automation through analytics and transparency and understanding the narrative of your revenue cycle in minutes, sometimes seconds, and not spending weeks of calling information to find out where I’m leaking revenue. Right. And that’s what we’re doing here. We’re doing that for all of our practice management clients. We’re doing that to the outside market. And when it’s applicable to build services around our technology, we do that, you know, a large part of our businesses, revenue cycle management and a lot of the technologies that we develop, whether it’s on the analytics front or workflow automation, is because we have to do more with less people and we have to get better results because our margins are there and they’re getting thinner and thinner and thinner.

Saul Marquez:
Well, Matt, I think you’re striking a chord with a lot of people listening right now. The theme of doing more with less is not unique to any stakeholder in healthcare. We’re talking, you know, providers, industry, pharma doing more with less is a theme, and I love what you said. We can’t throw people at problems anymore. We gotta get smarter and automation is the pathway to do that. You guys are hyper focused on it and you guys have a huge dataset. You’re playing a AI to it. You’re helping people save money. Give us an example of how you’re doing that to improve outcomes for your customers.

Matt Seefeld:
Yeah, absolutely. You know, we’ll all use metabolic actually as really the primary example. As I said earlier, a year ago, we were in pretty dire straits with with our margin depletion and we knew we had to get back to profitability, material profitability because we rely on that cash flow to fund a lot of the RFD that we do. The technology side of our business. And so what we did, obviously, we couldn’t throw people at the head our problem that was actually more expensive. And so we started to build out a lot of this A.I. driven workflow automation and we started to leverage analytics in ways we’d never done before. And because of our effectiveness with doing that over the first, say, 90 days after implementing a lot of the stuff, we had 30 to 35 percent cost reduction in our RCN department. And we were the board of directors was like, wow, that’s amazing. How did you do it? Well, what we did it by looking at process and most importantly, aligning new technology with process. And then the people around that, which is something that I learned early, early on in my career with what they’ll stock it is is that philosophy. The other thing we did was and you taught this to me as well as measure to improve. If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it. You can’t get results off of it. And so everything we do at MedEvolve is measurable. It’s actionable, it’s measurable. It’s time sensitive. We understand there’s a benchmark we’re working for. So. So we’ve done this internally with our company. And so towards the end of the fourth quarter last year, I was talking with our CEO and our board of directors and said, why don’t we give these tools, technologies and approaches to our client base? Many of our clients will don’t want to give up revenue cycle, which is fine. Why don’t we leverage what we’ve learned with them? And that is really just taking off in 2019. I mean, we are doing a lot more business both on the inside and the outside market by selling this technology, AI driven workflow, selling analytics, selling analytics now as a service. Right, where we actually support our clients with revenue cycle experts that can help tell them the narrative on a regular basis and help reassure them they’re doing the right things. And if you’re not doing the right things, we can give them advice on what they should be looking to do to again improve margin and maintain margin, whatever they do not feel like they have to sell to a hospital or close the doors, which is just not good for the community. We just recently had a nice one of our our large neurosurgery clients up in the Northeast. Neurological Associates of New Jersey was just interviewed recently by Robby Psycho Intelligence dot com. And that article came out a couple days ago. And it was fantastic to see the results from one of our clients already with using analytics and driven workflow and what that’s done to his business. It’s it’s really creating more transparency than they’ve ever had into the revenue cycle. It’s learning to be smarter with how they realign their people looking at ways to change process. And then the financial outcomes have been significant. And this is just the tip of the spear. Know, we’re starting to see these results with everybody that has been going to lie with our solutions, a share which has been very rewarding for us because this is our passion. Somebody asked me, what do you spend your RNC dollars on now? I said, we are spending our RNC dollars on analytics and workflow automation. Our goal, whether it’s an aspiration that’s attainable or not, is to impact every area of the revenue cycle. And with those those two concepts, because we know we have to to help protect our clients and our future clients on their margins, just like you said at the beginning, show without margin, they have nothing. And we need to make sure that they’re protected for that.

Saul Marquez:
Matt, I really appreciate your no B.S. approach to getting things done and truly I mean, hitting it where it needs to be hit to make things happen. Tell us about a setback. The shift to 30 to 35 percent cost reduction didn’t happen without any mistakes. Well, won’t you say you’re one of the biggest moment was, like that, you know. Tell us about them, what you learned.

Matt Seefeld:
Well, actually, it’s funny. I’m gonna I’m gonna call us out on our first approach at the analytics market in 2016. We had these ideas that we knew we needed to get more business intelligence into our practice management system. We really needed to get it into the cloud. We needed to do more data visualization because, you know, these tools have been around forever. In fact, the company I started back in 2007, that’s what we were we were competing with a lot of the big box data visualization companies like the Cognates and the Hyperion. And then we got more specialized going against folks like many analytics and it was acquired in some of these other other companies are out there that have really carpet niche out. But what we’ve done is that we made an assumption which was a bit flawed. It was a bit aspirational that our market, which is more of the smaller ambulatory, independent ambulatory practices had the time and in some cases the know how to really use data visualization to identify root cause problems. So we went to market with it. We of course, if you’re a 20 year veteran revenue cycle guy like me, I mean, it was great. I was a kid. The game started like, I know exactly what’s going on with these places. Naturally, it’s not necessarily when you’re when you’re an office administrator and you’re putting out fires left and right, you’re trying to understand go to market strategy and all these other things outside a revenue cycle. You don’t have the time to really dig deep into where your opportunities are. And so it was a bit of a dud. You know, we did sell some we used it internally. Of course, it meant a ball. But the market wasn’t really accepting it. So that was painful lesson because we invested a lot of money before asking where did all this money go? Whereas my return on us. But the nice part about it was it got us to be smarter. So when we started to approach 2018 and especially when our our margins were drying up and revenue cycle, we said, is there is there a simpler, more structured way to analytics that would benefit not only us, but also our clients. And that’s where we created the scorecard. And the scorecard, as I know it’s an overused term, but the scorecard to us is a story. It’s a story that gets produced on a regular basis. And it’s got a lot of key performance indicators structured in a way that tells a narrative. And we always joke internally. It’s over a cup of coffee. I can look at a revenue cycle scorecard for any of our clients and in less than five minutes, I know exactly how the revenue cycle is doing. In fact, if it’s not on par, I know the areas that we need to go look at with our clients to help solve those problems. And that has been absolutely revolutionary for us as a company because all we’re doing is taking data that’s in these disparate systems and healthcare. Right. Interoperability is the buzzword out there and we’re just structuring it in a way that allows a quick, fast, rapid, informed decision making. And it’s now digestible for our client. So that administrator that is so busy trying to just manage their practice knows after five minutes a cup of coffee, they’re gonna know the pulse of REM cycle and they’re gonna know whether whether they need to make an intervention or not or if everything is good to go. Move on with your day. Focus on all that other stuff. But if you do need to make an intervention, you’re going to know exactly where you need to do it. And you’re and you’re going to have the support. A revenue cycle, experts, amendable, helping guide you. These are people who’ve spent their careers doing large revenue cycle turnarounds. We’ve seen it all and that’s all we’ve done. And so that’s been really paramount. So while while we started out in the business intelligence space with a little bit of a flop, it’s actually turned in to be the cornerstone of our business analytics. Right. And work. So,.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. And so…

Matt Seefeld:
Glad to say it wasn’t painful though. It was painful for a year and a half. I said by far is exploitive myself.

Saul Marquez:
Now, listen. I think it’s a great story to tell. And you thought, hey, you know, people are going to be able to leverage this intelligence. Bottom line, they’re too busy, too much going on. And then you said, how can we simplify? How can we simplify yet offer the insights? And that’s when the scorecard was born. And, you know, as you were telling me about the scorecard, we have conversations with both business folks like you, Matt, and also clinicians. And on the clinician side, they’ve got the early warning scores and the early warning scores, aggregate data from across different patient monitoring platforms. And, you know, just checking in blood pressure, you name the signal that comes in and then it allows a clinician to take action early before it becomes problematic and they start to decline and so I love what you guys have done, sort of just to mirror that early warning score to help people with their business.

Matt Seefeld:
Yeah, it really had and I love your analogy there because, you know, whether you’re monitoring hypertension, obesity, diabetes, whatever those CHF, whatever those things are, we have read all our wearables nowadays, all this data streaming to the cloud. You can grab it through API. But I have algorithms on top to say, hey, you know, the Stasi files showing a little bit of a risk for a cardiac event. You know, let’s get on the phone and let’s let’s call him. And a lot of the insurance companies do now are starting to reimburse for a lot of that wellness related preventative care, which is nice to see. You know, we live on the financial tree outside, right? You said it to be good. If you don’t have margin, you don’t have anything. And so I’ve got to make sure that the tools that I bring rapidly tell our clients that they’re in a good situation. And if they’re not and it gets issue it ways and it gives them a compass to tell them exactly where they need to go to get out of that situation and maximize what they can. So what’s one of your proudest experiences to date with the company? I mean, it does sound like a broken record, but what we’ve done over the last six months with with our A.I. driven workflow and our analytics is is absolutely. It actually has brought me back to why I left the no sex and started at a point which was really my my passion. And it’s been exciting to see the company really transform around these concepts because, you know, for 20 years, we’re a legacy practice management company and a crowded space. And now we don’t have to brand ourselves like that. When I go into outside sales and I write speak at conferences, I don’t talk about rudimentary practice manager anymore, I talk about workflow, AI driven workflow, machine learning algorithms, speed to insight, cost reductions. Right. Things that you are talking about right now. And that is so much more exciting. And then towards the NSA and by the way, we have a practice that the system which at the end of the day is a data warehouse. That’s how we look at it. It’s aggregating data, you know, from the point of scheduling to the point you get paid and reimbursed. What we’re doing with that data now in the cloud, that’s exciting. And that’s been apparent paramount for me personally. And I could speak for some of the other executives and really metabolic as a whole. That’s what’s getting this up in the morning. We’re excited and excited to see results. I mean, when you start to see clients that are comfortable being interviewed and putting out their names and their quotes and the results publicly, that’s just exciting, right? I mean, paper press release are right about themselves. But when you see a third party independent, I was interviewing a client with results like like John John was able to do a neurosurgeon in New Jersey. It definitely feels like we’re on the right path and we’re going to just keep moving moving along that path.

Saul Marquez:
That’s awesome, man. Well, congratulations to you for the turnaround and the progress that’s being made. And what about an exciting project that you’re really, really excited about right now?

Matt Seefeld:
So right now, we’re obviously scorecard continues to be a driver of innovation, but our A.I. driven workflow is really our focus. And what we’re doing there is we started on the account receivable side. So you know what? What we’ve learned is about 80 to 85 percent of the claims that are outstanding with insurance companies don’t actually need to be looked at today. Now, that doesn’t mean someone’s not going to happen tomorrow. Like a denial. That means it needs to be looked at. But what we’ve learned is both for ourselves and our revenue cycle department and a lot of our clients is that they’re overstaffed in the business office because they have too many people doing things that no intervention is required. So by using artificial intelligence and bringing in lots of variables to see, does this claim actually have to be touched today or not? We have freed up resources and we were working smarter that our clients are working smarter. They’re able as some folks are not necessarily reducing staff or repurposing their staff. And that’s up to the client. Now, we were able to reduce staff, which helped our business materially. But if you can repurpose folks to the front end of the revenue cycle, maybe focus more on financial clearance, getting authorizations in place, novel concept collecting from patients prior to the service. Right. Those will all help the revenue cycle and they’ll help improve margin. So that’s exciting. So what we’re doing now on our workflows, now we’re working on our financial clearance workflow. So how do I make sure that the that patient shows up for their visit? They’re surgery. They’re literally financially cleared. Right now, a lot of groups out there say, oh, I have a process in place to do that. Do you then why do you have so many denials on the back end that tell me that those processes are not working? So we’re again, using technology to automate workflow to make sure that those patients are verified to have they were correct insurance prior to service. They’re verified to have the correct demographics so that if we do have to communicate with the patient after the service, we actually know their phone number and their credit card address. To make sure that the patient liability estimation is done. More importantly, to make sure that you collect that liability or at least get them financially sponsored before you deliver the service. Right. And these are all critical components of clearing a patient in this day and age. I would love to walk into a Whole Foods or bonds and just walk out with my food and say, hey, I’ll pay you later. I promise I’ll pay you later. Right. I think after the eighteen hundreds. That was something they do like. Yes. Do those old bastard shows where they just kind of write down on a piece of paper that hey you know, next month I do need a deposit on all the food. You take this too. But that doesn’t work for us, at least not here in San Diego. I get do that.

Saul Marquez:
In Chicago is doesn’t work that way either.

Matt Seefeld:
But that’s what we’re doing now. That’s what I did. That is if that’s what this health care is. It’s crazy. I mean, when I talk to clients you like. Well, I don’t really want to collect from the patient. May I go to church with them on Sundays and you meet their kids around the baseball teams? I just like as I understand all that. But if you’re out of business because you have no margin, what good are you to that community? And so and so you have to find ways to do this prior to service. It’s their responsibility. They know that now. Yes. High deductible plans are painful. Right. The change in the way that the landscape for all of us as consumers of health care. But, you know, those things are starting to change. Right. Price transparency is really picking up, you know, at some point down the road and maybe a mandate out there that you have to be transparent with what that cost is going to be. Quality measures, quality scores. Right. Google, feedback, social media, all these things are telling you how well consumers think of these providers. So those things are starting to help at the end of the day. Providers still needs that money because half that dollars are coming from them. It used to be mainly insurance money. Now it’s like a 50 50 split, or at least it’s moving in that direction. And doctors are not financially clearing their patients prior to that. Service are going to be valuable, casual lot of maadi in bad shape and it’s only going to get worse.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, the practices are changing folks, and the way that we approach transactions need to change as well. Matt, you’ve got some great ideas, a great focus here. So I really appreciate the insights. It’s time for the Lightning Round. I got a couple questions for you, followed by a book that you recommend to the listeners. Ready?

Matt Seefeld:
Sure.

Saul Marquez:
What’s the best way to improve health care outcomes?

Matt Seefeld:
The best way to improve outcomes? Honestly, you know, we just kind of beat it up is really making sure that you focus on the patient side of the liability in the short term. So much money is being written off the bad debt still so much money is being written off about that. So much money is still being sent to collections is not being collected upfront. So many patients are actually coming back to the same providers that have already gone to bad debt historically. So these providers are not only not getting the money from the last visit, they’re still not going to get the money for their next visit. And so there has to be a focus on a patient engagement, consumer engagement, consumer responsibility for the goals they owe. That’s a huge piece. The one other component I would say is making sure you’re getting paid what you’re owed based on your fee schedules with insurance companies. So many times I see clients like I think I’m getting paid. What about do you. How do you know? Let’s use our analytics and our AI driven workflows to make sure you’re getting paid what you deserve to be paid.

Matt Seefeld:
And so the next question is what’s the biggest pitfall to avoid? And maybe it’s not getting paid what you wrote?

Matt Seefeld:
You know, I think I think by first thing I would say is actually I’d say stop throwing people at a problem. That that is absolutely not the answer. We have proven it. Ask me if you if you want, reach out to me afterwards. And I’d be happy to tell you how we’ve made that mistake. But I also think, you know. Yeah, I think I think assuming that the consumer will pay for a service after you’ve rendered it. It’s a false assumption. There’s too many other bills on our desks out there. The health care bill for some reason always goes to the bottom because you got to put food on the table. You’ve got to pay your electric bill, mortgage, rent, health care, always at the bottom. So at least get a portion of that money from the consumer before you deliver the service. It’s your hard work. You need to get paid for it.

Saul Marquez:
How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change?

Matt Seefeld:
I would say I mean, for us, you have to continue to develop, innovate and deliver solutions and services that get results and reduce the costs to collect their money or clients money. I had a CFO one time. Tell me know I don’t want to buy services and solutions. I just want results. Man, can you just get me results? And I laughed and I said, well, that’s what our technology and services a desire to do is great. But I want the results. And that’s what they need. Right? They need to have innovation coming to them. That that’s cost effective innovation. But it’s going to get it in our eye and it’s going to be focused on reducing our costs and margins are too thin. They’re not going to improve. So that’s all. I think you stay relevant and you keep your doors open again. You close your doors. You’ve hurt that community, especially these hospital systems that are out there. That hurts me. Every time I read on a Becker’s every morning so-and-so hospital in a smaller town just closed out. Now those people have to drive to the big city to get in line to be treated for. For a lot of times, non acute stuff. And it is frustrating for pregnancy.

Saul Marquez:
What’s an area of focus that drives everything in your company?

Matt Seefeld:
I think for us it’s we really listen. I know this sounds cliche, but we really do actually go out and spend time on our dime to really listen and understand our clients. The reason we hire a lot of revenue cycle experts is dedicated their careers to revenue cycle management is so that they understand the problems our clients face every single day. And then what we do is we make sure as a company that we’re delivering the cutting edge technology and value added services to meet those needs of those clients. And that has really been our focus. You know, we don’t build anything in here in a vacuum. We just don’t. I mean, to there’s too much of vaporware in this industry. People jump on a niche and they go belly up, raised a bunch of money and then they go belt out these technologies and then they wonder why nobody buys them or they wonder why they’re out of business two years later. We’re not doing that. You know, we’re we’re listening to our clients. And that’s that’s so many technologies, services companies, other actually fail to do that. You know, they just make assumptions that they’re right and they know what the market is. You can’t do that in health care. There’s too many variables going on. We have to stay relevant with our or our clients.

Saul Marquez:
I give you an amen to that my man. And so these next two are more on a personal note for the listeners to get to know you better. What is your number one health habit?

Matt Seefeld:
You know, my health. I’ve been an athlete all my life, all through college. And I’ve really, you know, despite traveling hundreds of thousands of miles a year living in hotel rooms and eating club sandwiches at times, not always at 11:00 at night or, you know, I really, really try. I’ve actually tried to at least do my cardio. I’ve been big on swimming in the last couple of years. You know, shoulder problems, back problems. That’s really been meditative for me.

Saul Marquez:
How many times a week do you do it?

Matt Seefeld:
I try to swim,five times a week. Swim about eight to ten thousand yards a week is my goal has been on the West Coast. You know, I got the ocean air. I surf a lot. So swimming is kind of this is a nice counterpart there. I’ve also got two young boys. I’ve got a four year old, an eight year old, and I coach their sports teams. But I can tell you right now, I got to stay relevant with athletics. Otherwise, I’m going to be in bad shape because, you know, those kids are just running me into the ground so it’s been fun.

Saul Marquez:
That’s great. And and what’s your number one success habit?

Matt Seefeld:
You know, we talked about it a bit before I get up very early. You know, I had a friend and told me in college that he actually is a professor told her that if you’re not a morning person, become one. And that’s really been something that’s been important to me, is I get up early. I kind of find there’s that hour between when the night animals have just gone to sleep. In the morning, animals are just waking up where there’s some peace there,.

Saul Marquez:
That’s too funny.

Matt Seefeld:
You can meditate a bit and you get separated. And it’s been nice, you know, and it allows me to kind of free up sometime later in the afternoon to spend time with family. And that’s important to work life out there.

Saul Marquez:
I love that man. And, you know, we talked before the show and definitely I’m right there with you. And, you know, when you said morning animals and night animals, I first thought of like people. But I think he actually meant animals, animals,.

Matt Seefeld:
In healthcare. You’d never know. Right. It was all cause to go to church companies. You know.

Saul Marquez:
That’s funny, man. I love that. Thanks for sharing that. And what book would you recommend to the listeners?

Matt Seefeld:
The book that I did that I’d really has been my Bible since I started my own business back in 07 is Built to Last. You know, I think if you haven’t read it, read it. You know, it’s one of those books that really allows folks to understand that innovation has to happen if you’re gonna stay relevant as a business, you know, and you look at these businesses out there like look at Blockbuster versus Netflix. Right? Oh, my gosh. You know, back in the early 2000s, Netflix is sitting there and they’re sending us DVD ROMs right in the mail, which at the time was great. We all had DVD players, but I don’t think I don’t even know if I own a DVD player anymore. I think I do. But I’d have to go ask my wife if we could dust one off. Right. So now everything streaming and download speeds. Look at companies like Kodak. Right. And so, you know, it’s I think it’s just one of those things where if you want to stay relevant as a company in this industry or any age industry, especially health care, you have to evolve and you have to adapt. If we if we were having this conversation and I was talking to you about this practice management systems, I would be in very bad shape. I’m not talking about practice management system. That’s just the bottom. That’s that’s our data warehouse. I’m talking to you about AI driven workflow automation. I’m talking about the analytics transparency. And I’m talking to you about all of those things that make will make us successful. And those are those are things that are going to literally be the test of time for us. And that’s what we try to do. Every quarter we look at ourselves and we say, are we are we actually innovating? Are we actually staying up with where the market’s telling us because we listen to our clients or are we not? If we’re not, we make quick adjustments. Quick audibles.

Saul Marquez:
Love that man. And that’s Jim Collins, right.

Matt Seefeld:
Go get it. That’s right. Jim Collins, I think your audio book, everyone.. all the times.

Saul Marquez:
I’ve heard about it. I’ve read Good to Great, but I haven’t gotten to Build to Last. But in the context of our conversation, you know, with the story about your company and the context of health care and the really transformation that it’s going through, I think now’s the time to read it. So, folks, if you haven’t read Built to Last, join me. I’ll be picking it up here soon and I’ll it’ll definitely be going next on the list of reads that I’m going to make. So, Matt, appreciate that recommendation. And folks go to outcomesrocket.health and get the resources that we’ve talked about today in the search bar type in MedEvolve. And you’ll be able to find our entire show notes with ways to get in touch with Matt. Take a look at his website, as well as all the recommendations that he made on today’s podcast. So, Matt, a true pleasure. I’d love if you could just leave us with the closing thought and the best place where the listeners could continue the conversation after

Matt Seefeld:
Absolutely. I do appreciate the time. This was fun. And it’s refreshing to have someone like you out there really promoting this podcast and educating this market that needs to be educated because we’re all in this fight together. You know, I leave it with something maybe a little confrontational. Is it? You know, the cost problem of health care is not going to be solved anytime soon. And I kind of started the show out with that that assertion out there. And so what we have to batten down the hatches, I guess, to use a sailing analogy and we have to weather the storm. And the only way we’re going to do that is through finding ways to improve margin, through not throwing people at problems, but looking at innovative workflow, automation, innovative analytics, innovative scorecards, right ways to understand where our revenue leakage is. And so if we’re waiting on the drug companies to change our ways and the med device companies to change our ways, and we’re waiting on ways for the insurance companies to pay you more, then you’re getting paid today. You’re gonna be waiting a long time and you probably don’t have the time. Unfortunately, to weather that storm. So let’s do what we know we can do today, use technology, find services partners and technology partners that understand your business, that have expertise in your business and listen to you. And that would probably be the the one takeaway out there. In terms of getting hold of me. You know, we’re all social media giant now, right. Everybody has everything. But I’m on LinkedIn, Matt Seefeld, look me up if you want. I’d love to connect with you all. My email is just mattseefeld@medevolve.com. No one spells my last name correctly. So it’s s e e f e l d. But I always like to put an eye in there for some reason or started with C but you know, I’m happy to talk. I mean I do, as you can tell him, energetic about these topics. I love talking with prospects, with friends, family, anybody that is having to live in this healthcare arena that we’re in because we’re all impacted as consumers. Right. That’s why I love health care. It’s why I never left healthcare. I started in health care because I wanted to go deep on one vertical and become an expert in not vertical and understand how to do all that process. Innovation, process change can solve itself. That’s why I started stocking up and I didn’t go with a I look much more broad based consulting firm out there. And it’s paid off. I love it. I would never change anything about my career. I love the revenue cycle and I love what we’re doing with analytics and workflow automation now.

Saul Marquez:
Well, Matt, you’ve definitely shared a lot of valuable insights with us today. And folks, call to action. Check out the show notes, reach out to Matt, make a difference because healthcare is definitely not a spectator sport. So, Matt, big thanks to you and now looking forward to staying in touch.

Matt Seefeld:
Yup, absolutely. Thank you.

Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast. Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.health for the show notes, resources, inspiration and so much more.

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