Next Generation Electronic Health Record Technology
Episode 594

Christopher Kunney, Chief of Strategy & Business Development at DSS, Inc.

Next Generation Electronic Health Record Technology

This episode features the outstanding Christopher Kunney, Chief Strategist and Business Development Executive at Juno EHR. Christopher talks about how his company leverages technology to make better clinical decisions, improve disease management, boost the efficiency of the patient delivery process, and increase interoperability. He shares the goal of the company, the impact of integrating legacy technologies with cloud-based technologies, explains why his company calls it an EHR revolution, anecdotes and insights, and more. This is an incredible conversation you must not miss, so please tune in!

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Next Generation Electronic Health Record Technology

Episode 594

About Christopher Kunney
Christopher Kunney is the Chief Strategist and Business Development Executive at Juno EHR.  He’s experienced in healthcare information technology, and a strategist working with hospitals, health systems, accountable care organizations, clinically integrated networks, ancillary service providers, and physician-owned entities providing guidance and insights specific to emerging health care, technology offerings, compliance-related issues, and technology adoption. Before his work at Juno EHR, Mr. Kunney served as Senior Vice President of Health Care Information Technology for Coker Group and Managing Partner in I.T. strategist for Biotech Consulting. He also served as Entrepreneur in Residence at The Combine, Director of Emerging Health Care Technology for AT&T, Vice President and COO at Health Care Innovations, and Vice President and CIO for Piedmont Health Care.

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Saul Marquez:
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Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, Saul Marquez here, and today I had the privilege of hosting Christopher Kunney. He is the Chief Strategist and Business Development Executive at Juno EHR. In this role that he serves for at DSS Inc., the company that manages the Juno EHR product line, he’s employing the skills and insight that he’s developed over many years as a technology leader in health care. He’s experience in health care information technology, and a strategist working with hospitals, health systems, accountable care organizations, clinically integrated networks, ancillary service providers and physician owned entities providing guidance and insights specific to emerging health care, technology offerings, compliance related issues and technology adoption. Before his work at Juno EHR, Mr. Kunney served as Senior Vice President of Health Care Information Technology for Coker Group and Managing Partner in I.T. strategist for Biotech Consulting. He also served as Entrepreneur in Residence at The Combine, Director of Emerging Health Care Technology for AT&T, Vice President and COO at Health Care Innovations, and Vice President and CIO for Piedmont Health Care. We’re going to be exploring what their specific technology at H.R. does for providers and systems and also some of the issues that we’re faced with in implementing these technologies in the in the environment that we’re in today, but also in the evolving health care landscape. So, such a privilege to have you here with us. Christopher, thanks for joining us.

Christopher Kunney:
Well, thank you. It’s a pleasure to be here as well to talk about what we’re doing at the DSS specifically with Juno EHR. We’re excited about the EHR revolution that we’re spurring and we’re looking forward to hopefully helping to transform the industry, especially after what’s happening today with the pandemic and the challenges that health care organizations are dealing with and sharing data and leveraging technology to support the care of patients at this critical time.

Saul Marquez:
So, Christopher, thank you for that. And you mentioned transformation. I want to get there. Or you said a revolution. I think it was. I want to I want to stress. I love that. And we’re definitely going to explore the revolution here. And before we do get into the nuts and bolts of Juno and and how DSS is leading the charge here, I’d love to better understand what inspires your work and health care.

Christopher Kunney:
Absolutely. It’s a labor of love. And it’s definitely an interesting journey for me. First and foremost, my entire career has been in the technology space from my work to school to get a degree in computer science. I’ve worked for a number of different companies that were not health care. First, before I moved in, health care spent about two years and worked for companies like AT&T, Morsal Technologies and a few other companies. Ran my own practice for a while as well too. But in health care, health care technology in particular, for almost 20 years, having served on the provider side and then going to the dark side and becoming a consultant as well. And I gained a passion for health care. Having served again in a provider setting, I had the privilege of working for one of the prominent health systems within the Atlanta area, starting out literally in the Help Desk as the desk supervisor and ultimately becoming the CIO for the organization. And so I had an opportunity to see all aspects of the support mechanism, I.T. support mechanism within the organization and then operationally, because it touches every aspect of our health care system, both the provider and clinical side, as well as the administrative side. And I think the thing that really helped me understand the true impact of technology is on health care, as I had the privilege of being allowed to sit in on a surgery.

Christopher Kunney:
It was actually a transplant surgery, a kidney transplant between a father and a son. And I saw how the clinician depended upon the technology, not just the sheer scale of being able to remove an organ from another person and place them in another human being and get it to function properly. But how they use the technology to help navigate that process, and how dependent they were on that, not just the electronic health record system, but the clinical technologies that were being used, even the music that was playing in the room to keep them calm and to focus was a part of the whole technology mechanism and I gained an appreciation of that. And I realized that these systems now these computers, these laptops and mobile devices are now clinical devices. They’re no longer just kind of nice to have or could be a piece of technology. But they actually have an impact on a clinician’s ability to deliver care. Far be it for that device and those systems not to function properly, because if not, they could literally have an impact on someone’s life. So I gain an appreciation for it through that journey on the provider side and even more of an appreciation, when I had an opportunity to go out and act as a consultant and strategist working with a wide variety of health care systems across the country in helping us select and implement and manage that infrastructure and the importance of it in all sorts of settings. So it’s been an interesting journey for me and a labor of love. And the other piece I think it was that really helped me as well to really have an appreciation for health care and health care technologies, working with companies who hadn’t necessarily traditionally been in a space, but we’re trying to get into the health care space and sought my advice and trying to understand how do we effectively sell our solutions in health care and telling those stories and helping them understand that once you make this commitment to health care, you’re not making a commitment just to sell technology. You’re making a commitment to save people’s lives. And if you’re not moving into the space with that mission and mind that you’re not going to be successful because health care is purely a mission driven industry.

Christopher Kunney:
And as we can see today, I mean, look at all the providers, clinicians who are risking their own lives to take care of these folks who are dealing with the COVID-19 virus. I mean, it’s admirable to see the heroism that’s taking place each and every day by ordinary Americans who have taken on that task to take care of their fellow, their fellow man. So I’m proud to be a part of the industry. I’m proud to help to bring technologies to the industry to support that mission. And I’m proud to be a part of DDS of the company and what we’re trying to do to launch the next generation electronic health records system.

Saul Marquez:
Christopher, while sad and crazy story, you know I love your story. You’re the service manager, the CIO and you have that pivotal moment where you were in that surgery, that transplant surgery, and you realize that dependence on technology. And now it’s turned into a commitment to not just sell technology, but to save lives and enable those people at the front line doing it. I mean, it’s such an inspiring story. Christopher, thank you for sharing that.

Christopher Kunney:
You’re welcome. And if I could just embellish on that just a little bit more. There was another deciding point in my life as well about how technology can impact the quality of care with my father. My father passed away, but at the time he was dealing with rheumatoid arthritis and was going for a tremendous amount of pain and difficulty. And I remember taking him to a dermatologist. This was 15 years ago and walking into the examination room and sitting down and waiting for the doctor to come in. And when the doctor came and he brought a big stack of papers, which was basically my father’s medical record, it was probably three inches high. He walked in and sat down and said, Hi, John, what’s going on? Of course, he’s in pain, so I’m figuring out to alleviate that. He’s been there for about three or four minutes, just kind of paging this three-inch stack of papers around my father’s situation. He finally closed the folder and said, John, I really don’t know what to do at this point for you. So we can try different regiments at this point, but I’m not sure. And so that really struck me as well, that with all that information that is in that folder that is available to him, it cannot it was not aggregated, consolidated, presented in a way that helped him make a better clinical decision of it. And I’ll try something. And that really resonated with me, that we need technology to be a part of this process to help us as human beings, aggregate and leverage information in a more effective way that we just can’t take all of this information. Health care changes on a day to day basis, that new discoveries, new protocols, all sorts of information that’s happening literally on a day to day basis is no way one human being can keep that information up to date in their own head. And so we have to depend on technology to be that resource for us to consolidate that information, aggregated to provide some level of intelligence behind this, to help us make better decisions when we’re treating patients. And so I think that was another thing that stood out as to why I’m committed to this this industry as well.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, for sure, Christopher. And, you know, we’ve made a lot of steps forward with this EHR capability. However, there’s still so much more opportunity to keep building on that. And so at the beginning, you mentioned revolution. I want to dig into that sound. So tell us a little bit about what Juno EHR is.

Christopher Kunney:
Absolutely. And I’m going to try to take a kind of a roundabout way to get to where we are in terms of Juno and the revolution that we’re starting. But when you think about just a decade or so ago, you know, most providers of doctors and hospitals to some degree weren’t use to actively using the EHR charge. Everything was still very much very paper-based. The financial system, some of the best of breed technologies within the health care setting were tied to computer systems, but they weren’t all integrated in a way that allowed that patient information to flow seamlessly from the initial registration, through the clinical care, through the discharge, into the financial components of that. And those first generation of cards that came out were really more focused around capturing charges so that you could build on the back end.

Christopher Kunney:
They weren’t really designed and set up to help clinicians make better decisions, really just to capture, you know, speak out for the most part. Fast forward to now, this adoption of technology as a result of starting with the Bush administration and then doubling down through the Obama administration, through the funding that was provided to acquire electronic health record systems, there became now this insatiable appetite by health care providers to leverage technology to make better clinical decisions. The unfortunate thing was that we were still using these legacy EHR systems that really weren’t designed to allow them to seamlessly leverage those technologies and improve the efficiency of the patient delivery process, but more importantly, serve up information in a way to help them make clinical decisions quickly and expediently as possible. And so we’re still somewhat into that phase. I think we’re in kind of now that one point five second generation where there’s been some improvement in the development of electronic health records that take into consideration the clinical aspects of it. But if you ask most health care providers, are they completely satisfied with their electronic health records systems? And I would venture to guess that we actually have done surveys on this as well. The majority of them will say, no, they’re not. They see benefits, but they’re not happy. And in most cases, they will say they’re inefficient. They actually have reduced their ability to see patients. They’re very cumbersome and they need to physically enter information into the system themselves versus somehow some sort of automated process that still requires them to go through several screens and clicks to consolidate information in a way that helps them understand that for patients situation and then the technologies that they need to gather additional information outside of their own clinical system, the interoperability between their primary care provider and other specialty care is still limited as well to it. So they only get a small picture of the current state of that patient in the system, and that becomes very frustrating for them.

Christopher Kunney:
So reducing the number of clits, increasing interoperability, having critical critical workflows, making that navigation kind of streamlined and intuitive, just like if you went to LinkedIn or you went into Facebook or something and you didn’t take a class on things, they were intuitive. These technologies should be intuitive as well. So fast forward four years ago, our leadership decided that it wanted to make an investment in developing the next generation EHR. And DSS as a company has been around almost 30 years. We are exclusively in the health care I.T. space. We have that quite a bit of work on the federal side, working with arguably the largest health care system in the country, which is the V.A., and implementing a number of different technologies and supporting some of their systems, including their electronic health records system. And so we recognize the challenges and issues there. We made a commitment to start to build the next generation EHR. First and foremost, we’re moving it to a fast model or our cloud based model to reduce some of the operational and capital expenses associated with it also allows us to be able to integrate other technologies into our tool. And we hired clinicians to be a part of that design process. So we really tout General EHR as being a system that’s built by clinicians for clinicians. So we thought about these issues around reducing the number of clicks, serving up data in a way that’s unique to that specific clinician needs. So a doctor sees views based on their perspective.

Christopher Kunney:
A nurse will see news and information pulled up based on their needs, the ability to share data amongst multiple systems and support things like surveillance monitoring, virtual assistive technology, telemedicine are more seamless through our systems as well. And so we’ve become a platform for clinical information that all these are the best of breed technologies could now plug into in a more seamless way and providing the types of reporting and data analysis and data intelligence that helps that. Should make a better decision and then using that data for things like surveillance, monitoring their population, disease management down the road helps that organizations, those clinicians to become better at what they do. And so we believe that we’re now already starting to revolutionize that delivery of care. And we are primarily focused today on serving healthier systems that are struggling in this space. And so we’re looking at a critical access hospitals, a rural community hospitals. It really is our target market because we feel like there’s a great need to offer a solution, a solution that supports those immediate needs. And as we grow as an organization, we gain traction. We’re more than happy to go after Goliath’s of the world and serve their customer base because our product is scalable to the multi enterprise level as well. And so I said a lot, but that’s who we are as a company. We’re a company that’s passionate about health care. We’re committed to health care. Is the industry we’ve been in for almost 30 years. We’ve cut our teeth on working with some of the large integrated delivery organizations like the V.A. and public health organizations. And we’ve taken that knowledge and expertise and now design what we believe is this next generation electronic health records.

Saul Marquez:
That’s great history and context. And I think know just one of the key differentiators is the SAS model and it being on base and being able to do more with it. Recently, as you well know, there’s been a fight against this type of availability from some of the more established players. The opportunity to do better is there. And it sounds like that’s what you guys are positioning yourselves to do.

Christopher Kunney:
Right. And we don’t have that baggage. Quite honestly, though, the more traditional electronic health record companies who built their initial solution on a client server model and a lot of their revenue is driven by that model in and of itself. And so we are flexible enough now to be able to develop technologies on these emerging platforms that really where the rest of the other industries are going. No one’s building client server applications anymore as a long term strategy. They’re all trying to move to more cloud based solutions and fast models on mobility platforms. And we don’t have that again, that technology baggage to have to bring along these legacy platforms into that model. We’re designing and building our solutions are these best of breed technologies so that when we go to market, we are already there without having to migrate customers over. And we’ve built that. And we’ve and we’ve thought about those legacy customers who are already on those platforms and that integration. I’m sorry, that migration strategy. We’ve thought about that and will be streamlining that process and making it more cost effective to move away from those legacy platforms into a cloud based model as well.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, it’s it’s interesting work for sure, Christopher. And, you know, a lot of hospitals well, you know, government, private and publicly traded, have invested millions and millions of dollars, billions of dollars actually on this. And, you know, one of the biggest challenges will be, hey, you know, we’re we’re invested in this. How do you guys plan on getting around that?

Christopher Kunney:
Well, again, one of the things we thought about, one of the things we’ve been very successful as a company today on the federal side and the work that we do with the VA is our ability to integrate some of these legacy technologies with some of the emerging technologies. So we’ve got a strong team of people who do that on a day to day basis. And so we’re able to create a roadmap for our customers are getting away from the current legacy solutions into a cloud based solution over some period of time. The other way we look at Juno is almost they can think about Juno almost as a sales force of the EHRs. We consider ourselves kind of the platform that other systems can tie into as well. So if you’ve got a, say, a legacy lab system or a legacy financial system, or pharmacy system that you aren’t ready to move away from for whatever reason, we still have the ATIs to fire the fire ATI technologies, to be able to integrate you seamlessly into the emerging platform, which is Junp. And so over time, you can start to migrate away from those other legacy systems as you age. But you don’t have to do that day. One, you can stay on some of those systems if you needed to, and still replace that core base EHR with our solution and still integrate them together as well.

Saul Marquez:
That makes a lot of sense. And I see why you call it a revolution, because it is. I mean, the shift to this is very forward thinking. And many corporations, companies, individuals are unwilling to take the challenge because it’s a big one. And so tell me a little bit about what inspires you and DSS commitment to make this happen.

Christopher Kunney:
So I will have to give all credit to the founders of the company, the buyers brothers, who, again, almost 30 years ago decided to start a company that was focused on really revolutionizing technology initially in the federal space, but took that same philosophy and determination, courageousness, quite honestly, in many cases, to now start to go after this market and the market. As you know, there’s a handful of players that openly dominate this market today. And it’s unfortunate that there aren’t a lot of options for health care organizations, especially the small and midsize organizations, to choose from. And we just believe that it’s the kind of cost the time has come for, another solution to emerge, another option to emerge that they can choose from and start to drive that transformation that needs to happen in the industry, both for the small and mid-sized and ultimately for the larger enterprise and multi enterprise organization. The reality of it is that technologies are moving more towards cloud based and mobile based platforms. Stick your head in the sand and say we’re going to go kicking and screaming. But the longer you wait, the more costly it’s going to take you to migrate away from that. And so we’re trying to build a platform that, first of all, allows you to transition to that over time, but also places you in a position that allows you to take full advantage of the system today. But the system is also designed to support future emerging technologies as well, to not just stuck on this platform. The platform will grow and scale with you as your demands grow. And if the industry changes and we think about what’s true and what’s going to happen kind of with the advent of telemedicine, with the focus now around surveillance, monitoring, using mobile based technologies to track patients, more of the health care being delivered out of the acute care setting into the ambulatory setting, you’re going to need technologies that are going to allow you to support that model going forward.

Christopher Kunney:
And we believe what we design is best positioned to enable that strategy to take place for a health care organization and do that as a very cost effective way. Because now when you think about technology, technology is now kind of a utility, just like the water, the lights, the building. Right. To run a hospital without water, you can’t run a hospital or electricity. And now you can’t run a hospital without technology. But the technology, the legacy technology is it I like to order in the lights that you use on demand. You have to make the major capital investments in infrastructure that you may or not see that a real return on investment. We’re designing in a way where you don’t have to make those huge capital investment, but you buy technology or you leverage technology on demand. So it becomes almost like a utility for the organization and you can scale up and increase your capacity and use of that technology as you need it or vice versa. Let’s say there a downturn and you need to scale down. You could do that seamlessly as well. But in the traditional model, you make huge capital investments in infrastructure. You can’t scale that back and get that those cost savings because you’ve already got that cost.

Saul Marquez:
Fascinating. And I love the analogy that you provided, Christopher, as a utility. You know, you’re going to have that flexibility to not have to do these huge investments up front to enable it, you know, and think about the promise of something like this and also wonder, how are implementations going today and where are you guys? Are you are you already in hospitals? Tell me a little bit more about that.

Christopher Kunney:
So we have components of our application as a whole and different facilities. Like I said, again, the federal side, major components of our application, clinical documentation of the components and others are leverage today and the largest healthcare system in the country, the VA. On the public health side, we have our behavioral health applications, our urgent care. The components of that application are being leveraged there. And in some smaller, real health care settings, we’ve now taken those technologies and built end to end solution that we’re now just bringing to market. So we are actively looking for customers and partners we like to think about as partners who are looking for that complete comprehensive solution. They’re willing to make an investment in a company that’s got a 30 year track record in the industry that’s stable, that has at its core a very capable, knowledgeable individuals who understand health care from end to end and have to find a solution that’s going to now take them to the next stage in their strategic vision that they have for their organization as well.

Christopher Kunney:
And so that’s why we call it a revolution. We’re looking for those people to join that revolution. Let’s shake up. Because we believe if we’re able to do this, all the other organizations out there who are going to have to follow. And that’s just going to make the entire industry better as a whole.

Saul Marquez:
Well said. And yeah, you know, it’s OK, folks, if you’re curious, it’s dssnc.com. And in the menu bar, you’ll see solutions and click on, you know, you’ll be able to find out more right there. But just some fascinating work being done by Christopher and the group over there with JunoEHR. What would you say you’re most excited about today mean?

Christopher Kunney:
Just the possibilities that exist with this platform. If we are truly successful in incorporating this platform and a number of different health care organizations, I mean, we create a foundational infrastructure that allows them to maximize the capabilities of a wide set of solutions.

Christopher Kunney:
A.I., for example, as telemedicine or voice assistive technology, patient centered medical home and monitoring technology, robotics. I mean, there’s so many different aspects of this industry that this hub that we’re designing will be able to enable an organization to take full advantage of and not just the high end health care facilities who have all the resources at their disposal, but the ones who are critically needed, those rural health care organizations, those critical access hospitals who need to extend their reach in their community, their capabilities within their community. But they don’t have the resources to do that in the most effective way. We believe a solution like this enables the ability to do that. And that’s what’s really exciting. And I come from a small town. I grew up in a small town. You know, that whole conversation about my father, that was a small town doctor that was there. I mean, to be able to extend that individual’s capability so he or she makes better decisions for those local community folks. That’s really what gets me excited. And that’s why I get up every day to try to help move the ball forward and transform the history of it now.

Saul Marquez:
That’s wonderful, Christopher. And you’ve been doing this for quite some time. And the vision you’ve painted here for us is very exciting. What types of books are you reading? Would you recommend any any reading to us?

Christopher Kunney:
A couple of books, not one that I’ve recently read. And then the follow up to that. Look, this book’s been around a little or a little while. It’s actually released IN 2013. It’s called the Phoenix Project. And it’s a novel about I.T. development ops and helping your business win through the use of technology, which is a fascinating book, especially for those of us who are in I.T., who are launching technologies, who see the challenges of organizations shifting their focus and kind of trying to leapfrog competitors in the market. It’s a very fascinating book that talks about kind of all aspects of that from the developers all the way up to the executive leadership. So I read that fascinating book and then I’m reading the sequel to that, which is The Unicorn Project.

Saul Marquez:
So Phoenix Project is one. And then the Unicorn Project is a second is the follow up..

Christopher Kunney:
So just kind of started reading that. And that’s all about digital disruption in that age of technology, which again talks about kind of how do you now, you know, really disrupt the industry. How do you look at things a lot differently than they are today and predict where the industry is going or pull the industry along? When you think about iPhones and iPads and the whole smart device industry. None of us thought about we needed those things. So the industries were created and we started seeing building and they will come. They built those technologies. We saw value and we adopted them. Now they completely disrupted the way we live our lives. I mean, we are completely dependent upon our cell phones and smart devices to just do basic functions. I mean, I can’t remember my kid’s phone numbers. It is sad to say, but thank God for, you know, my my iPhone Right.. Otherwise I’d be walking around with a phone book like we used to in the day or a map to figure out how to get.

Saul Marquez:
Us and everybody else Right. because.

Christopher Kunney:
Yeah, exactly. And so, you know, those two books in particular really are of interest to me, just kind of around my own personal development and business. And then, you know, I I’m kind of a little bit of a historian. And so I read the history books. There’s a couple that I’ve been reading. Marcus Aurelius has a book on that called Meditations. Yes. Which is, I think, a great book as well, to really talk about just values and how do you live your life and what drives you. And so I find that an interesting one. And I take off on biographies that I’m actually reading the biography. Biography Jay-Z.

Saul Marquez:
Nice. Yeah. So I go on a great entrepreneur.

Christopher Kunney:
Ah, that’s right. Talk about an American story, Right. from rags to riches, somebody that’s from the wrong side of the tracks become a billionaire through his talents and his business savvy as well, too. And then finally, there’s a book I’m reading by Ryan Holiday called The Obstacle is the Way Turning the Timeless Art A Turning Trials into Trials. So how do you use those issues, the challenges that you have to be few to help you try to success? I always use this term. You can’t have a testimony without a test, right. How do you use those things as a way to fail forward quickly and learn from those and become ultimately successful journey. So those are just a few things that stand out right now. But I’ve got several others. But I will for you.

Saul Marquez:
And this is great. Some great opportunities to expand our minds and strengthen the spirit of a good book. And folks, you know where to go. Outcomesrocket.health. In the search bar type in Juno, And you’ll be able to find our podcast here with Mr. Christopher Kunney and also type in DSSInc. searchable will come up. Christopher, an incredible discussion today. Inspiring to hear about the revolution you guys are kicking off. Leave us with the closing thought and then the best place where the listeners can reach out to you to continue the conversation,

Christopher Kunney:
Closing thought. I just thought about that. I’m reading. It’s called Deep Medicine How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Health Care Human Again by Eric. Obviously a very well known thought leader in the space. I guess for me, it’s always about asking yourself the question, what’s the worst that could happen? So anything that I’ve done in my life or my career, any challenges that I’ve taken on, I’ve always ask myself the question, what’s the worst that can happen and can you survive? And nine times out of ten, the majority of the things that I pursued in my life that stretch me personally, I’ve been able to I’ve had failures as well, too, but I’ve been able to survive them. And even in those failures, I’ve learned from those experiences as well, too. And so I just want to encourage people who are trying to figure out the next thing in their lives, especially post COVID19 percent of the question, what’s the worst that can happen? And can I smart enough to answer is yes. Then I say pursue it with the passion. That’s that’s in your heart. The experience in and of itself whether it’s a success or failure will still grow you in a positive way.

Saul Marquez:
That’s a great message, Christopher. Thank you, Christopher. Before I forget, what’s the best place for folks to reach out to you and continue the conversation?

Christopher Kunney:
Absolutely. You can contact me on my email, which is ckunney@dssinc.com. ckunney@dssinc.com

Saul Marquez:
Christopher, appreciate it. And for anybody wanting to learn more about the EHR revolution getting kicked off here by Christopher and his team, be sure to reach out to him. And Christopher, just want to conclude by saying thank you for for sharing your passion and the amazing things you guys are up to.

Christopher Kunney:
Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to share it with your listeners. I look forward to hearing from some of them. And I will definitely continue to be an avid supporter of the program going forward as well.

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Things You’ll Learn
You can’t run a hospital without technology.

Changes in healthcare are inevitable. If we continue with changes, other organizations will follow and that will make the industry better as a whole.

We learn from failures.

Pursue your interests with a passion. The experience in and of itself whether it’s a success or failure will still positively grow you.

Resources
ckunney@dssinc.com
https://www.dssinc.com/