Improving Healthcare Delivery Artificial Intelligence
Episode 458

Sajid Ahmed, CEO at WISE Healthcare

Improving Healthcare Delivery Artificial Intelligence

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Improving Healthcare Delivery Artificial Intelligence

Episode 458

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sajid@wise.healthcare

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Improving Healthcare Delivery Artificial Intelligence with Sajid Ahmed, CEO at WISE Healthcare transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Improving Healthcare Delivery Artificial Intelligence with Sajid Ahmed, CEO at WISE Healthcare was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring health care leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the podcast that I had the privilege of hosting Sajid Ahmed. He is the CEO of WISE Healthcare. He’s a true innovator and pioneer in health care information systems. He has unparalleled experience in all aspects of applying computer technology and web based applications to deliver the highest quality of medical care to patients and provider systems. He is the visionary behind WISE Healthcare and is guiding its work in artificial intelligence, workflow, engineering and health care organizations, virtual health care and more. He also serves as an advisor to the leadership team at Martin Luther King Junior Community Hospital in South Los Angeles, where he was formerly the hospital’s chief information and innovation officer. In that role, he oversaw the hospital’s 70 million dollar health information technology initiative and launched an innovation hub on the 42-acre MLK Medical Center campus. He created and launched a console in partnership with the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. He consults as an innovative telehealth system that allows for virtual consultations and collaboration with specialists. That is becoming a national model for the standard for care coordination and access to specialty care in the US. Today’s podcast we’re gonna be focusing on virtual care and world of health care access. How that’s changing. What do we have to do to adapt? He’s a devoted husband and father of two, enjoys backpacking, running and diving and super grateful that he carved out a couple of minutes here of his time with us. So, Sajid can’t thank you enough for being here.

Sajid Ahmed:
Thank you for having me. I really appreciate it.

Saul Marquez:
Now that I leave anything out in that intro that you want to fill in?

Sajid Ahmed:
I think there was just too much in the end. But no, I think that captured it perfectly. For me, it’s been a real journey in health care and learning both the payer side when I worked at L.A. Health Plan and then having to launch a startup hospital, the Martin Luther King Hospital in South L.A. and learning the provider side has really given me a great breadth of knowledge and experience and working with amazing people in those two settings.

Saul Marquez:
So in the -your time at MLK that you guys built that from the ground up?

Sajid Ahmed:
Yeah, I was employee number two – find interesting. And and yeah, it was there was a startup hospital and one of the most we don’t have enough time in this podcast to talk about it, but if we ever did another one, I would tell you a lot about that experience and what we did really for the community in South Los Angeles and the history that’s there. But yeah, this startup hospital from the ground up was one of my best experiences in healthcare. I think I’ll have for a very, very long time.

Saul Marquez:
Man, that’s really cool. And just thinking about the impact that all your work and the team that worked on that made and how it’s just going to carry forward through the years as is something I’m sure you feel really good about.

Sajid Ahmed:
100 percent. Yeah. I mean it’s I can’t tell you enough. We’ll have to do another podcast one day just to talk about that.

Saul Marquez:
And so we’ll make that the teaser, folks. So if you’re listening and you’re like, oh, why don’t you talk about that today? Well, you’ll have to tune in for the next one. Sajid, so what is it that that got you interested in the medical sector?

Sajid Ahmed:
Just to keep it very brief? There’s a long version, but the short version is since I was a kid, my parents were like, you know, you’ve got to be a lawyer, doctor, engineer, you know, Indian parents. And at the same time, when I grew up in my time, computers weren’t really prevalent. The Internet wasn’t really mean. It was up, but it was between academic centers. So, you know, I really was focused on becoming going into medicine. But at the same time, I had access to here in Southern California, where I live near Pasadena, access to computers. Most of my friends parents worked at JPL, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratories, NASA. So I had access to the first Apple and then a Commodore 64. So I really got into programming. And when I went to UCLA, I kept both of my interest alive. I was pre-med, but I was also a programmer for the very first computer lab for a med school, the UCLA Med School, the very first computer lab in the US designed to train doctors on computers. And I got to work in this computer lab and set computers up and do programming. And I think those two passions really kept me going.

However, I really got involved in Silicon Valley during the dot com era and got ultimately involved in a medical startup company with a number of specialist doctors who wanted to jump in on the Internet bandwagon at the time like everyone else. And that really led me through learning about healthcare in a very the business of healthcare. I should say in a very intimate way. And that experience brought me to today just to fast forward where I’ve been involved in both medicine, health care and technology and really have had an amazing career to date, especially with working on a public health plan like care. In the last 10 years and also. Startup Hospital. So I think what led to that interest was, you know, maybe parents pushing in a certain direction. But I also was very fortunate where I lived. I lived very close to NASA, JPL and I worked at JPL when I was in high school. So I got real hardcore programming skills were, you know, volunteered, worked in hospitals and in the healthcare environment when I was at UCLA. So I think that really gave my background that you could say in both medicine and technology.

Saul Marquez:
Sajid, that’s awesome. And I love just learning about sort of that in that road that you took the beginning of things. And as you well know, trends change. And so as you’ve seen the system evolve. You’ve been part of that evolution early on. What do you think is is a topic that needs to be front and center in the minds of the leaders listening today?

Sajid Ahmed:
Well, I think for the first time. Well, let me qualify that. I think for the first time in a long time, there is this recognition in the industry that adopting technology is a requirement, not a ancillary or kind of a hobby that your I.T. director would come to you, whether you’re in a health plan or clinic or hospital and say, oh, here’s a new tool. Really, health care has been an industry that’s been lagging in adopting health information technology, not medical technology. Medical technology advancement in the US has been tremendous. The US is a leader in MRI eyes, in new surgical tools and even biopharmaceuticals and genetic design drugs. New treatments has been very treatment oriented, I think very perhaps some very diagnostic oriented. But what the business of health care has lacked adopting is a health information technology, health I.T., as we call it, that involves EHR connecting data through health information exchanges and really integrating, quote unquote, telehealth, which I call virtual care. I think those three now have been forced in the last 10 years, one in part due to the funding in 2009 from the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. There were two pieces of legislation in there that put forth billions to procure to help providers buy each cars. Now we have eight hours almost everywhere. For better or worse, in many cases for the providers, because of the challenges at one point, the EHR is. And I think now slowly, this idea of sharing data between systems and the value of that data, not just to the patient, but there’s a business value in the new reimbursement contract and new research and contracts in these hco environments where the sharing of data for the purpose of managing a population, rather, and also an individual managing an individual’s care through a patient centered medical home as well as managing a population of people. Those have become drivers of adopting these electronic health systems and sharing data. And now I believe we’re at a tipping point where we’ve had these devices that I know you have on your desk and I have in my hand these smartphones, these amazing computers that are far more powerful by factors of 10 to 100 than the computer that took man to the moon 50 years ago. So you have these amazing tools and technologies, high speed bandwidth, Internet available almost everywhere you travel. And so the idea is people are using this to do banking. You and I do our banking. We order food, we order are our rides and we do everything on this device. I think we’re coming to the point where we’ll be accessing health care through that device and talking to our doctors directly, getting diagnostic assessments, using AI agents and scheduling appointments as easy and as simply as ordering anything that comes to our mind on Amazon and getting it delivered, if not tomorrow, the same day. So I think we’re I think that mindset needs to be really adopted, that technology and consumer technology is changing and will change how health care is accessed.

Saul Marquez:
And the focus is access right, Sajid. I mean,.

Sajid Ahmed:
That is correct.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. So you’re listening to this thinking about this from a from a provider or a payer perspective. How are your communities are accessing healthcare is changing. People are they’ve fallen. We have fallen in love with the way that we interact with our providers. Like Sajid was mentioning the numerous rides or food or you fill in the blank there, health care is next and how we adapt is the call to action self. Give us an example, Sajid of what you guys are doing at wise health care to bridge the gap.

Sajid Ahmed:
So thank you for asking. Because I think one of the reasons we started WISE and WISE is an acronym. Like everything in health care becomes or is an acronym, So WISE stands for Workflow, Innovation, Sciences, Engineering. It’s a way of saying that regardless of technology or process, what I learned at MLK. There are many lessons there and setting up a brand new hospital to treat patients of our local community is that you can bring in the best technology, you could have the best workflow design right up from scratch. But the moment you bring in people into that process and to use that technology workflow falls away unless you don’t engage those people in that conversation, in that workflow design. So one of the things that we are launching and have launched here in the Inland Empire, both in San Marino and San Bernardino and Riverside counties, two of the largest geographic counties that include urban and rural environments where patients have very limited access to primary care and very, very limited access to specialty care. They have to travel sometimes an average of 70 miles to seek care is that we said, well, we want to make access to care for this population out in the east side of southern California, east of downtown L.A., all the way to the borders of Nevada and Arizona. We want to provide that population of people that has limited access to care and a convenient way to access care, a convenient way for their doctors to communicate with their colleagues about that, about them and about their patient care. Determining whether they need to seek specialty care or not. So in a very specific implementation we’re doing, we’re launching what’s called an eConsult. It’s been around now. Thankfully, it’s been around for a little over eight years. Originally started out of San Francisco General Health. And I give a lot of credit to Dr. Alice Chan and Dr. Howe Yi, who led the first eConsult implementation in San Francisco. I was at L.A. at the time and my good colleague and friend at L.A. Care, Dr. Lee and I went about doing a pilot on eConsult. We saw that this eConsult worked really well. And what it eConsult is, is an electronic communication between a primary care provider and a specialist. And really, it’s a way to make this curbside console as physicians know what a call of their colleagues for advice. A formal process, an electronic process. And more importantly, we’ve evolved that now to today as a care coordination process, meaning that the patient, when they go like you and I, we would go to see our primary care. And the primary care doctor traditionally would say, OK, I see this rash on your arm or I can tell you have a urological issue or a G.I. issue or perhaps even a cardio issue. And I really think you need to see a specialist that would make a referral. Right now, 60 percent of healthcare is access through a referral process, meaning primary care doc refers to a specialist that’s throughout the nation and predominantly through managed care. That’s one hundred percent of managed care as access through a referral process. And when you have this, that becomes a barrier, a barrier for someone living not only in rural communities, but a barrier in low income impacted urban communities such as South L.A. and other areas throughout California and the nation, where there isn’t that much specialty care within that geography.

Saul Marquez:
Or even ways to get there. Right. Like the social determinants and…

Sajid Ahmed:
Yeah and even ways to get there so. Right. Yeah. And that leads into social determinants. So real quickly, what we’ve done is deployed a process using our our wise methodology called INCA innovation change approach. Another acronym that basically says we use design thinking and lean approaches to basically implement this process. And this process is supported by a very simple type, a secure messaging technology. Now, what we’ve done, which I give all the credit to my teams and to the leaders here in the Inland Empire who have really said this is the direction we want to go. We’ve made e-console part of the business process of the referral and the authorization of that referral. We’ve made it a required process, meaning any time it’s not voluntary, it’s not just like a esoteric telehealth tool that a primary care provider can choose to use or not. We’ve said, look, there’s a benefit. The benefit is very simple. The patient sees you doing the console with the specialist and two out of three times, yes, they need a face to face care. And you’ve already now benefited through the console process of having your workup already packaged, how you got the information ready to go to the specialist that you’re going to see. But one third, one out of three times up to thirty five percent of the time, you don’t need to see that specialty care because the primary care doctor, in coordination with that specialist, has come up with either a treatment plan that can be done by the primary care provider in the setting that you’re already in and co-sleep closer to as a patient. And or it’s been determined that you don’t actually need to seek care either, not Right.. Now, or maybe not even in the future, that you can come back six months later. A third of specialty care visits and I don’t like to use this word deferred, but are not necessary, and people say, well, isn’t that another way of gatekeeping? The answer is no, because this specialist that is talking to your primary care doc is helping that primary care doc understand what is necessary to make that appointment. What is a value to the patient? So imagine you don’t have to drive unnecessarily for an appointment. That would be set three to six months in the future by eliminating a third of those unnecessary specialty visits, but still providing specialty care through the primary care,  what you’re doing is you’re opening slots for those specialists in all those specialties to see patients that need to be seen earlier. So outcomes we talk about outcomes in you. And this is Outcomes Rocket outcomes are very straightforward. Reduced No-Show rates faster appointment to specialty care, a better quality of care when you do go to see a specialist. Less visits over time because the tests and the studies done by a primary care provider are included in that. He counseled and sent to that specialist that is seeing you and an as saying, OK, I don’t have to have you come back again after ordering this test. Those three benefits, faster access to care and direct quality of care through this electronic messaging system is what he canceled is in fact, I think it’s evolved beyond a console. It is really an electronic dialogue, a care coordination process. And the technology behind it isn’t novel. It’s very similar to our what we do on our phone. The text messaging, the email, it’s secure and it includes all the data that needs to be exchanged between the two providers. But I think this has been a quiet disruption that I’ve been very fortunate to be part of since 2010, when I first started nine years ago at L.A. Care. And I had the pleasure and the wonderful opportunity to launch it throughout all of L.A. County. So now I can very proudly say that I’ve been part of a transformation from the Santa Monica coast here all the way to the desert east of Los Angeles in Southern California, that that entire geographic area covering almost fifteen million people is now have access to E console through the public systems is how we’ve deployed it. But E console is now spreading throughout all of California and various implementations and stages. So if I take kind of make a case of what we’re doing is we go to every one of the 300 plus clinic sites, we’ve gone to every one of the hospitals that we work with in the Inland Empire and basically have my teams have gone to each site to do this workflow redesign to better adopt and use the E console process, which is now required by the health plan in order to get an authorization for specialty care. So I know I’ve gone on and on and there must be a number of questions, but I have to tell you, this is not been easy, but it is.

Saul Marquez:
I can’t imagine. Yeah.

Sajid Ahmed:
One of the amazing transformations that’s happening right now.

Saul Marquez:
So, I mean, a fascinating work, Sajid and you know, the I can hear that passion as you talk about the journey and how this care coordination put in place as a requirement is where my head keeps going. And just and I’m sure all everybody listenings like, well yeah, not so easy to make it required. So what was the process to get that done?

Sajid Ahmed:
That’s an excellent question. And actually, that’s the seminal question, I think. I think other peers that are listening to this podcast, hopefully if they don’t mind my voice, other providers, health plan administrators, I think the takeaway is that the value of providing convenient, timely access to care is very important. So important that it outweighs all the concerns that I hear. And I mean, I get asked about, well, what’s the liability? And I get that question asked in both the primary care provider and the special saying, well, what’s what’s my liability? I’m having a conversation with this other provider. And we we have to answer that question. And then we get questions like, well, I just want to do a referral. I’m a doctor, I’m a primary care doctor. I know what my patients need. I know this is for a why can’t the health plan just approve it and move on? Why do I have to talk to this doctor every time and we answer those questions? You know that it’s a not every time. And and this will really benefit you. So we don’t get to everybody all at once, all our time. But I think to answer your question about how and why we made it mandatory, how we kind of worked at it, we’ve done it in a very collegial way. We start off working with everybody as stakeholders that’s involved. So we worked here in the Inland Empire as an example with two of the largest public systems, brought them in as leaders, as stakeholders to really support not only the members of the health plan, but other patients that they can. Use this console process on even four other pairs and said the investment is going to be made, and I think the main part of how to even get those stakeholders in is as a leadership. Dr. Brad Gilbert, Dr. Jennifer SALES, the CEO and CMO who launched this with us two years ago. They really and both of them being primary care docs in their previous lives and still doing some time, understood the challenges, but they also understood the value of doctor sales in particular. Did the E Console in L.A. County, where it was also required? And she saw that being implemented when I was implementing it and said, yes, it can work. So I think when you have leaders that recognize the challenge that recognized the value and can help support the message and engage stakeholders and bring them in through a process. And our process at wise is a very stakeholder buy in process. That’s the first down. That’s the second step is empathy. You walk with those primary care providers and their staff, you. It’s a high touch hand-holding, full support process because you are going in there and it is a disruption to the normal business and practice of healthcare. When you say, oh, you’re no longer doing a referral anymore, you’re doing in E console or in a dialogue or whatever you want to call it what it is as you’re saying now, you need to think about sending a message of a clinical question to a specialist, a virtual specialist that will respond to you within a day or less and give you that input on your patient. And then the challenge for the primary care provider that we’ve learned in this particular environment of implementation is communicating to that Medi-Cal and Medicare patient saying, hey, we’re not just here to give you referrals. I’ve been asked to do a console, which I’ve seen a value. And I will let you know in a day or two whether you actually need a specialty care visit or not, which is do you need a referral now? Because patients, I think, aren’t directly involved in the process. But there they have indirect expectations that they went to a primary care and getting a referral. So imagine you have this cultural shift that you have to support, a culture shift of expectation from the patient who is expecting a referral, a cultural shift of the primary care provider who is inundated with patients on a day to day basis that their FJC or or medical practice and they’re just trying to move that patient along in the system. And all of a sudden we’re introducing a new process, an intervention that doesn’t take that much time. And we’ve done the studies on this one. But the perception rate of change, change, change. Yeah, it’s huge. And then getting specialist reviewers to and many of them I think that’s been the easier part is specialist reviewers are seeing the writing on the wall that to augment their business or to have a transition from doing practice, 30 years nonstop practice where they see 20 or 30 patients a day, depending on the specialty, the full day they’re transitioning into, how can I use my expertise and provide care? So one of the things I think I’ve mentioned as a teaser to all of your listeners is they will be a land grab for specialists to provide specialty care remotely, whether it’s using live video, live consultation or asynchronous communication like a console. I think there’s going to be a landgrab because that mind trust is gonna be very useful. And I think there’s this recognition now. A lot of care can be provided remotely in the comfort of our home, whether it’s an acute condition or if it’s a chronic patient that that should remain at home and the care at home and providing this leveraging technology to do remote monitoring, to do live consoles with the patient at home. That is the holy grail of access to care for many people rather than taking getting an appointment two weeks from now, if you’re lucky driving to that appointment, then getting a referral that’s two, three months away and driving to that location. Ultimately having your care impacted where you need to go the E-D. So the outcomes potentially are tremendous. Reduced unnecessary. E.D. visits faster access, better outcomes because the access is faster and better and better overall health outcomes. So I think that’s my takeaway for anybody looking to adopt a care coordination process and making it a mandatory business process. A mandatory clinical process is to really lead is to really address those issues. And I don’t mean to overtly advertise, but they have to commit to a team that can support those doctors. And that process, whether it’s a wise health care workflow team or it’s an internal project management team that can go in or care coordination team or a clinical informatics team, whatever this team is called inside a health plan or a hospital system or even at a clinic level, clinic organization level a referral coordinator. Those folks support workflow redesign is one of the key subsets factors after leadership direction.

Saul Marquez:
I love this Sajid, you’re sharing some incredible, incredible pearls here for the listeners. And you know, at the very beginning of our talk we talked about you mentioned the perceived and the real challenges of what we’re now calling virtual care instead of telehealth. I believe one of the real challenges is that the opportunity to access the pool of specialty care across the US Right., we’re still kind of antiquated in our in our policy. You’ve got to have a license in every state. What’s your thought there?

Sajid Ahmed:
Well, so policies are evolving. I don’t know if they’re quick enough, but I have seen an acceleration in the last year and a half with a couple of announcements last year by both the Centers for Medicare Services CMS that’s updated its telehealth policy to include more reimbursement for telehealth access for certain specialties within the state of California. Also, there was a following after the CMS announcement that updated the state of California’s telehealth policy that included that actually just became finalized as of July 1 of this year to allow both reimbursement for an increased number of specialties that also adopted what I think should be adopted nationally, which is they made the patient’s home and originating site, which is great. So that means payers will reimburse doctors for communicating with patients at home while the patient is at home. So the patient doesn’t have to come into a clinic for the provider to then file a claim for that care opportunity. And more recently, this also included E console reimbursement as defined as a console, as defined in the tell out policy for both the primary care provider and the specialist. I think this is a tremendous advance mission and first step and that has that has become also as of July 1, effective as of July 1 of this year. So I think there’s been an adoption and a change, a great change. Just give me an example of what’s happening. Just in the last couple of years, a little over 2, 3 years ago in Texas, a patient had to be seen by a physician in person first before they could do any remote communication. And that finally was changed. That policy was changed by the Texas Medical Association and legislation at the state level. Just a few years ago. But I think what’s been the biggest change is the former director of the VA, David Shulk. And before he left, was able to push through and get policy to make the V.A., the providers in the V.A. unrestricted because it’s a it’s a federal entity. So they could do it unrestricted. What I mean by that is a veteran can be in Florida, can talk to and remotely communicate with in whatever form diagnostically or consulate wise with a doctor in Seattle. So the state by the state by state restrictions. So the provider had to be in the same state as the patient does not exist for the V.A. and also the V.A.

Saul Marquez:
That’s very cool. Is that recent?

Sajid Ahmed:
Yeah. That that was as of a year and a half ago. So that is the first nationwide.

Saul Marquez:
That’s amazing.

Sajid Ahmed:
Lifting of that restriction where the doctors have to be in the same state as the patient to provide telehealth, which is ridiculous. I think the V.A. became a leader in this. The V.A. also took away the word telehealth from its lexicon. They refer to everything as virtual care, because that’s the point. Virtual care is exactly about its care provided virtually through remotely through all the devices that are ubiquitous now,.

Saul Marquez:
Telehealth is like so dusty, right..

Sajid Ahmed:
So it is. It’s been around for well over 30, 40 years. The military was one of the first ones to actively use this concept called telehealth. In fact, it is called telemedicine first, telehealth became the broader definition and term to include other things. And I think now we’ve landed at a virtual care. Some people call digital cabinets virtual care. And telehealth, unfortunately, has a historical kind of affiliation with academia. And it was a very focused study in providing access to care in remote areas, rural, really remote rural areas that have very limited access. But I can tell you, urban areas have very limited access to health care, too. So using these mobile devices and not thinking of them as telehealth helps from both a policy reimbursement and implementation, because when you think of telehealth now, people think of it as an ancillary or an extra service where as we just think of it as another modality of care, doctors talking to doctors through email and phone, that could be interpreted as telehealth, but it should just be another modality of care. Patients and doctors talking through the phone or video and getting access, getting care, diagnosis and treatments through these modalities is just that. It’s just another modality whether I’m seeing my face, my doctor in person or not, shouldn’t matter how that care is provided. So I think that mind shift is part of what I would convey to anybody listening to this podcast. And I think they all I think everyone sees it. I think it’s just adapting that mind change and saying, oh, we’re not creating a new service line. We’re just accessing the specialty care through virtual care. And I will tell you that that is something that the wise health care is doing. Wise health care has supported the launch of a brand new multi-specialty virtual care medical group called Hub M.D.. Hub MD is is just that? It’s a hub for specialists that we work with. And it isn’t just to provide a console or live console. There’s a new model of called coverage for emergency department work that’s done on a per VM basis where DOCS specialists are on call and they go into the it?i. We’re launching that service as a purely virtual care service with penalties for doctors coming in. That’s a higher cost. So really working with ED DOCS and the hospital system to say we can bring top notch specialists right into your ed, right into alongside your it?i doc and the patient end for most console required calls to specialty care can be done virtually. And yes, if you need someone in person. Yes, but that is not the primary driver. So I think virtual care and how it’s adopted will be a single driver of success. And I think there are numerous institutions. I’m not the news leader on this talking about this. Others have committed millions of dollars to both building a hospital that’s purely all virtual care, where all the doctors are providing care virtually. You’ve got Teladoc, you’ve got American well and well. You’ve got a number of medical groups that are converting their practices and especially into virtual specialty care practices. You’ve got, I would almost say, hundreds of technology companies that are supporting either as their primary business or as their secondary support to other businesses virtual care. It is a multi-billion dollar business right now and it’s growing tremendously. I think the last ad I said that I saw was it was over twenty three billion dollars in business next year and perhaps even more. I might be a bit out of date on that one, but yes, it’s huge. I can go on and on.

Saul Marquez:
This has been an awesome interview, folks. Virtual care is here to stay. The world of health care access is changing. How do we adapt? And that’s what we’ll leave you with here today. Sajid Ahmed, chief executive officer of Wise Care. Visit them at wisehealthcare.com. Is that wise.healthcare?

Sajid Ahmed:
Wise.healthcare.

Saul Marquez:
Visit them at wise.healthcare for more information. And as you all know, go to outcomesrocket.health. Type in wise healthcare in the search bar and you’ll find the entire transcript and short notes for this interview. Sajid, leave us with the closing thought and best place where the people could follow you.

Sajid Ahmed:
Yes, I would say that for anybody in health care or outside of health care, this is this moment right now that we’re in is one of the most important moments in health care. It’s one of the best times to be involved in health care. The amount of innovation and transformation that is happening is amazing. And I think the opportunities with other companies coming in like Amazon and now Google and Microsoft and Apple coming into health care in a very smart way, bringing in leaders such as the former CEO of Geisinger and Atul Gawande who’s been a leader in health care. These companies are hiring these leaders to come up with new ways to deliver care better, faster and actually transform care. So I think for the first time in my 30 plus years in health care, have I seen a real transformation that’s about to happen. So this is an exciting time. And yes, if you have any questions, please reach out to me @sajcookie on Twitter. But really, sajid@wise.healthcare. You can reach me there. And of course, on LinkedIn, Sajid Ahmed. You can find me on LinkedIn and ask for any questions you guys have. We’d love to answer and connect with like minded folks as well. Thank you, Saul.

Saul Marquez:
Hey Sajid, it’s been a true pleasure. We’ve learned a lot here today and now looking forward to staying in touch.

Sajid Ahmed:
Thank you, Saul. I really appreciate it.

Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast. Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.com for the show notes, resourses, inspiration and so much more.

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