Elevating the Social Determinants of Health For Best Outcomes
Episode 531

Dan Brillman and Taylor Justice, Co-founders at Unite Us

Elevating the Social Determinants of Health For Best Outcomes

In this episode, we have a fantastic conversation with Dan Brillman and Taylor Justice – Co-Founders at Unite Us. This outcome-focused technology company builds coordinated care networks of health and social service providers. Dan and Taylor discuss the need for an effective community-wide care coordination network, the challenges of creating a trusted framework, the significance of empowering communities to address needs, and ensure seamless delivery of service to those who need it most and more. They also share their insights on addressing both community-based and cost-of-care outcomes as well as scaling assistance on a community level, especially in this Covid-19 era.

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Elevating the Social Determinants of Health For Best Outcomes

Episode 531

About Dan Brillman

Dan received his bachelor’s degree from Yale University and worked in finance and consulting before joining the Air Force Reserve as a combat pilot, where he still serves today as an aircraft commander assigned to the 76 IRS AT McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. Dan earned several combat air medals during multiple deployments both in Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns. After his MBA from Columbia Business School in 2012, Dan worked in venture capital in New York City, where he focused on investing in technological innovation. Dan co-founded Unite U.S. in 2013.

About Taylor Justice

Taylor is a U.S. Army veteran, graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 2006. He was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army as an infantry officer and later received an honorable medical discharge from active duty. In 2013, he co-founded Unite Us. Taylor also completed his master’s degree from Columbia Business School.

Elevating the Social Determinants of Health For Best Outcomes with Dan Brillman and Taylor Justice, Co-founders at Unite Us transcript powered by Sonix—easily convert your audio to text with Sonix.

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Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the podcast. Saul Marquez here, and I have the privilege of hosting Dan Brillman and Taylor Justice. Both are the co-founders of Unite US, a firm specializing in technology and also the social aspects of improving social determinants of health to make people healthier. Dan graduated from Yale in 2006 and worked in finance and consulting before joining the Air Force Reserves as a combat pilot, where he still serves today as an aircraft commander assigned to the seventy six IRS at McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. Dan earned several combat air medals during multiple deployments both in Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns. After his MBA from Columbia Business School in 2012, Dan worked in venture capital in New York City, where he focused on investing in technological innovation. Dan co-founded Unite US in 2013. He’s a recipient of the Jefferson Award for Public Service and was recently added to Business Insider’s 30 people under 40 changing health care. Passion about helping others in tackling tough issues, Dan is a fierce advocate of programs that improve public health. His co-founder, Taylor Justice, also a U.S. Army veteran, graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point in 2006. He’s commissioned as second lieutenant in the U.S. Army as an infantry officer and later received an honorable medical discharge from active duty. Taylor co-founded Unit US with his partner Dan, and together they’re doing fantastic things. Taylor also went to Columbia Business School, where he earned his MBA. Taylor is leading Unite US on its mission to launch coordinated care networks across all 50 states. A key architect of Unite US network in North Carolina. Taylor led the Unite US team and supported their partners in creating NCCARE 360, considered by some to be the most innovative statewide health care transformation endeavor in the country. In 2020, Taylor was named to Krein New York businesses 40 under 40 list, driven by the belief that health begins in communities. Taylor advocates for national infrastructure that connects health and human service providers, a public utility to better support those in need. In today’s interview, we’re going to dive into why they’ve been so successful at Unite US in scaling their social determinants of health platform and some best practices that we could take at the community provider and also employer level to make health care better for everyone. I’m excited to showcase this interview for you all. I hope you enjoy.

Saul Marquez:
And so with that outstanding intro, I really want to welcome both of you, Dan and Taylor, to the podcast. Thanks so much for joining me.

Dan and Taylor:
Thanks for having us. We really appreciate it. Thanks for having us. Appreciate it.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. It’s an absolute pleasure. The work that you guys are doing at Unite US is really impressive and much needed. And so what I want to do is take some time first. Before we dive into how you guys are connecting health and social care and what type of impact that’s having for really, you know, care organizations, employers and communities. I’d love to hear more about what inspires your work in health care.

Taylor Justice:
Yes. This is Taylor. I can jump in. I mean, our work started in the community and really was fueled by personal pain point. So back in 2013, when Dan and I started this business, we were initially just focused on the veteran and military population. We both served in what was in the U.S. Air Force. I was in the U.S. Army. And while we have a little bit of different paths to this work, my journey started from I was an entry officer in the Army and unfortunately was medically discharged. And, you know, through that experience, just kind of dealt with the inefficiencies of connecting to employment and education, dealing with the V.A. And you just saw that, you know, that process could be a little easier, but didn’t necessarily struggle and was able to fall back on my undergrad institution. But I was always worried about those folks that maybe came from came into the military directly from high school or didn’t have a strong support network. What were they going to do? And, you know, the work really started when I moved to Philly, got involved with a veteran nonprofit organization and quickly saw that, you know, people had these co-occurring needs across health and human and social service. And the majority of organizations that were providing care were operating within their own silo. And so we didn’t start off in the social determines health space. We didn’t start off as a health care I.T. company. We started off in the community trying to solve a real problem, which was, you know, there were significant barriers in accessing care. And this isn’t just health care. This is those human and social service needs, education, employment, housing, finance. And we wanted to solve that problem in better coordinate these organizations that were doing the best they can, but that know about complementary services or that they are working with a shared client with an organization across the street. And Unit Us was formed to coordinate the supply of of organizations that were. Doing this work day in and day out and arming them with 21st century technology.

Saul Marquez:
That’s fantastic. Now, thanks for sharing that. Sounds like you went through some pain points yourself and started from the community and evolved. How about you, Dan?

Dan Brillman:
Yeah, I mean, we obviously share from a mission different perspective how we really wanted to focus on, you know, not how we just connect folks to the services they need, but most importantly, how do we track the outcomes and ensure what happened after? And that goes back to just the mission driven way we’ve helped veterans that we served with and helped our communities. And what that’s really transformed to seven years later, you know, for us has become really this infrastructure that is across communities that obviously has grown way beyond veterans and has grown to all populations and has become really this public infrastructure that ensures people get the services they need, regardless of who they are, their backgrounds, and provide value to not only the people that need the services, but most importantly, we’re really building the efficiencies and and the visibility into what’s going on for clients that are for the service providers that that need it. And not just health care providers, but also the community.

Saul Marquez:
That’s great. That’s great. And it’s so important. Right. I mean, you think about four, five, six years ago, it started to become mainstream to talk about social determinants of health. And today it just table stakes and operationalising. You know, how we care for people, how we increase access, you know, provide efficiencies are critical. Tell us a little bit about how your program works and how exactly you’re enabling, you know, care providers and communities to identify these gaps and bridge them to provide better outcomes.

Dan Brillman:
Yeah. So, I mean, just at the base level, what we’re really doing is getting organizations that serve the same client across health care, government and social services to effectively coordinate. That means sharing client data across sectors so that they can simultaneously work together around a shared client that has multiple means going on. So from that point of view, what that requires is technology that can stretch across these sectors and allow each type of organization a provider, a payer, a government service and a broad range of social services to effectively, electronically refer to each other, track and communicate back and forth by directionally and most specifically, track the distinct services provided in the outcomes that are being delivered outside the four walls of each organization. And at the base level, the technology is really the foundational element that allows for effective and secure data sharing between organizations. And on the other side of it is, you know, how do you get the supply on to the network? And so as a company, what we’ve developed, we’ve taken that on from a network management perspective. We have almost 100 people that are in the communities that we work in that actually go out and build a rapport and build a network with these organizations. Talk through their workflows, ask them why, you know, what is valuable to them, how would they want to participate in this both on the health care side and the community side? And that package together is really the foundational elements of what a network is. It’s around quality and accountability. So that truly it is a no wrong door in how people enter the network and get the service they need. What we’re really promoting from a value perspective at the end of day, is the journey for a client in need doesn’t have to start in the emergency room. It doesn’t have to start in the place that maybe costs the most Right.. And so we’re empowering the community to really wrap around clients and ensure they can communicate with each other and address need closer to their home, not just in the hospital. And that’s why you’re seeing this really take off from a social determinants of health point of view and big investments from governments, from payers, from providers is because they really need that connection. One, they need that visibility, two and they need the outcomes and the data to show, hey, when I effectively get someone to these services very quickly, they have a support system around them. And it’s not just a medical way to do that. That’s really where the effects come in to drive change.

Saul Marquez:
And that’s very interesting. And so this shared space where all of the stakeholders can gather around that goal of of healthy people, you know, I mean, on the one hand, it’s phenomenal. On the other hand, I think about all the potential challenges, right. in getting people to agree that, yeah, this is where we want to do it. Can you walk us through how you got there and maybe even some of the challenges today that you’re overcoming to be able to provide this service?

Dan Brillman:
Yeah, I’ll start and I can jump in as well. This is a very localized approach that has to also scale. And so services are local there in the community. When we started seven years ago, we started with the Right. framework, but also the hardest framework. And it’s always where the market is. And so seven years ago, we had to actually get about 40 organizations to agree on a standard of what data sharing looks like between each other. Meaning? How do they define certain terms? And this is healthcare in the community. How do they agree what an employment outcome looks like? Very distinct library of outcomes. How do we do that for housing? How do we do that? And I would do that for physical health. And so it’s not just the technology, it’s actually the trusted framework of how you are going to work together securely in a system like ours. And to do that. That took us almost a year. Seven years ago. And that’s also because, you know, the different levels of technology, adoption, seven years old, is different than where we are in 2020. And it’s amazing to see that as the evolution of technology continues, especially now our telehealth as an example, Right. rapid acceleration of that, where seven years ago people may have said and ask questions of, oh, wow, I, I don’t even know if this is possible. You know, seven years later, people are saying, you know, why weren’t you there several years ago for us? You know. You know why it’s almost we need you yesterday. So I think is amazing. So the challenges that will continue to have is really what we’re continuing to do as a company is also provide a lot of change management in communities, right. a new way of actually providing services. And while, you know, the departments may be called Health and Human Services, they are, you know, very distinct in how they’re paid for. Right. And how they’re for the capacity building. There still is medical care in their social care. And integrating those two from a business model perspective, I think is the challenge, the opportunity that we’re always going after. And that’s what gets us excited about it.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Yeah. It’s interesting. So you guys built that trusted framework and somehow you guys got everybody to at least agree for the most part. Tell me more about that. I mean, that that in itself is probably the differentiator of what you guys can provide. Right. Just tell me more about how you guys got there and and how that’s been able to flourish to what you guys are doing today.

Taylor Justice:
Yeah, I think there’s two ways that we got there. The first was the first product to be put into the market was the wrong one back 2013. We felt that if we populated pretty mad with a bunch of resources on that map and made it available to all veterans and their families, we’d solve their problem. But what we realized is that a resource directory doesn’t get the job done because there’s no accountability of the organizations on the other end. So we were, you know, in our first couple of months sending veterans and their family members to a black hole in the beauty of the veteran military community is they don’t let you blow smoke. And so they let us know that this didn’t work. And Dan and I were very lucky to have patient investors that allowed us to flip our model on its head and focus on coordinating the supply of organizations, solving pain points that they have in providing services to the end user in the veteran and the military family. So that now, once that veteran entered one of our networks, it was a supply chain that was going to work for them. So that was one aspect we had. We had to cut our teeth on actually building the right product, not just building a feature and selling it as a product. And then when we came into the health care landscape in 2015, 2016, as social to terms of health really started to bubble up, we had to stay true to what we knew the market needed, not what they wanted to buy at the moment. So in the very early days of social determinants of health products, because social terms of health has been around for decades. But from a product perspective, people were selling resource directories, so they were competing with United Ways and two on ones that are historically a created resource directories. They were just kind of putting it on a technology, selling it to a health system or health plan. And those plans were just handing information off to patients, members, clients and sending them out into that black hole, had no way of tracking outcomes, had no way of knowing what happened to person even show up. So we had to kind of fight that battle, because when you bring technology plus that human component that goes into a community, builds a relationship with a community based organization and creates value for them, just like you need to create value for the health system to participate. Most people don’t think you also do that for the CBO. It’s just those CEOs are historically understaffed, underfunded and overworked. So if you can’t create efficiencies for them, once the adrenaline of a new technology fades away or a resource directory fades away, usability is going to fall off a cliff. And so we had to really kind of cut our teeth and stay true to the mission of we’re going to build a community wide care coordination network. We’re going to explain the value of having a supply chain where you can prove every outcome for every person that you put into that network, not just check a box. And so that was tough. You know, it took a while for the market to catch up. But, you know, I think it was Wayne Gretzky, you know, skate to where the puck is going to be. That’s what we did. And the market caught up real quick because as they started to push things out there, they realized they were getting no data. And so the need to build this infrastructure, the need to have that connection and relationship with a community based organization and digitize it, that’s where we really started to see our hyper growth and why we became the leader in the space. When we talk about networks, we’re not talking about a resource directory. And can people access it and turn it on tomorrow? Now we’re talking about. Care Coordination Network, a supply chain where you’re gonna get an outcome positive or negative every single time. Just eighty four percent of the time we’re able to positively resolve issues which previously has never been able to be captured before because no one did the hard work of building the network on the ground.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, that’s a great distinction. Taylor, and I appreciate you highlighting that to us. You know, folks, you’re listening to this and you’re thinking, wow, that’s something that I probably never thought about. And Dan and Taylor are very well versed in this segment of social determinants of health. Those that are experts in their field have the appreciation of multiple distinctions. And that’s one that I’ve just learned of, this supply chain problem and resource directory vs. community based care coordination plant. So so how did you guys solve the supply chain problem? I mean, because that seems like out of your control.

Dan and Taylor:
Well, I think that, you know, you… Go ahead Dan, all you. Will both take it.

Dan Brillman:
I think it is a problem that we programmatically solved over the last seven years. And so each time we’ve done it, we we learn each time we share those learnings with the next one. And once you do it 50 times, you know, by 2018, you’ve learned a lot. Do you do it 70 times? In 19, you learn even more and it becomes a practice. And so you teach that practice. And part of it is it’s a multi stakeholder approach. And so you have to understand each of the stakeholders. And by no means have we learned everything we continue to learn each and every day. We didn’t think we in five years ago, we’d have churches on right.. Churches are access points for people requesting services. And that became a new type of provider, Right. in our network. That we didn’t think was relevant. We didn’t think that electronic referrals into the health care delivery system was going to be something that was requested. And now it continues to get requested for proper utilization of primary care. Right. When people are using the emergency room as their primary care. And so how can we effectively empower the community with these types of things? So we continue to learn those, but we’re the ones with the practice and the expertise that allows us to do it well, do it quickly and efficiently. This isn’t, you know, multi years. And then you have something. This is how do you get on the ground with the organization, understand their workflows, how they’re going to participate and help them understand why they’re why, what they’re exchanging or teaching them that, you know, no longer, you know, spending an hour with someone when you could spend three minutes because you know where to send them and how to know what happens on the other side. That’s so much more effective. But it takes the groundwork to get that done. And that’s really how you work with the supply. And you also have to build something that’s valuable to the stakeholders as well. Right. visibility into things you didn’t have before. Right. Knowing where your clients went, data and impact that you didn’t have before are all things that we’ve had to fall for.

Taylor Justice:
I think part of that, too, to kind of double tap on getting in front of these organizations is it would be ludicrous if we went to a health system and said, hey, plug into this system without matching workflows or connecting into where that makes sense and creating value for a health system to want to participate. But most organizations don’t think about that for the community based organization. They just think, oh, we offer them community benefit dollars or philanthropy. We’re going to give them technology and they’re just going to use it. And I think how we get these organizations to be willing to sign service level agreements, meaning they’ll respond to referrals in a certain time. They’ll keep their information of the day and they’ll give you outcome data on services that have been rendered because most technology companies will not spend time with the community based organization to help them become operationally efficient. We will. Awesome. We have the ability to remove manual processes. We have the ability to remove manual administrative workflow. Some organizations are seeing an 85 percent drop, which is saving 15 hours per employee per week. And you talk about those organizations that are historically understaffed, underfunded and overworked. Huge leaps for them. And then you now give them data that’s not only happening internal to their four walls, but now they’re this web in a conduit to these other services and a community, because it’s not just a tool that health care uses. It is empowering these community based organizations to address needs as they uncover them because they do it today. They just do it through phone calls, emails or that brochure on the on the wall. Now, they have 21st century technology to connect to a complementary provider, see if that person shows up and see the outcome all in their view. And now you give them data. So indirectly, they’re using that for grants and philanthropic funding. And then we have mechanisms to get them reimbursed with notice payments and some of the other products that we have. You have to create value. You have to have conversations. And you have to be in the community. So as hiring folks from the communities with which we’re deploying. They understand the local dynamics. They understand the barriers. They understand these organizations that have worked there for decades or part of that community. We’re not just selling tech and walking away.

Saul Marquez:
That’s fantastic. And, you know, it kind of. To the next question is, when you have traditional payment models in our healthcare system. You got to wonder, well, how does this get paid for? You know, a lot of these communities can’t afford technology upgrades and things like that. Can you guys talk to us about how this fits you, how your solution fits into the supply chain?

Dan and Taylor:
Yeah. So, yeah. So we think about…

Taylor Justice:
So we think about it in a couple different ways. I think when you’re creating an emerging market, there’s a lot of things that you have to do. And part of that is, you know, six years ago we were historically going after philanthropic dollars of organizations that wanted to seed investments and trying to figure out how we create value for public private partnerships where government can come into play. And nowadays we’re seeing that, you know, social determinants of health and the need to have solutions is validated. But creating that operational model hasn’t yet in this excuse me, that financial model has yet. But there are organizations that are that have done their own ROIC analysis and have created those those work streams. So we see government coming into play again, establishing 21st century public health infrastructure, public health 2.0. You see health systems and health plans that are seeing this as an opportunity to reduce health care costs were avoidable ED utilization. And, you know, if they’re having issues with with capacity where, you know, someone is in a hospital bed for longer than they need to for a clinical reason because there isn’t an appropriate way to discharge them. And then as you start to move up, stack from that and create rate cards where you start to redistribute health care dollars to human and social service spin, you can now start to pay for these social service interventions. Think of Lyft rides, medically tailored meals, removing moldy carpet from someone’s home. You know, the 80 percent of someone’s overall health happens in the community and not in a clinical setting. How do we then bring that into that person’s overarching health picture? And so as we start to create those work streams and you create value for the health care system to reduce costs and engage with these community based organizations, we then had to create solutions in the back office for the CBO to submit invoices and so make claims back for those services. So we become this marketplace where health care, community based organizations are not only working together, but they’re in a business relationship together as well. And the whole goal is to improve health, not just health care, but health.

Love it. That’s great. Thank you for that. You know, and this is a great example of how doing the right thing pays off and it pays off for all the stakeholders involved, the communities, the health of people, community based organizations, providers. I mean, it’s just great. And kudos to you guys for sticking with your mission when it could have been so easy to just pivot to that directory. What a great example. And I’d love to hear maybe an example of how you’ve improved outcomes. I mean, I guess a lot of them. But it’d be great to hear one in particular that you you guys are fond of.

Dan Brillman:
Yeah. So we have multistakeholder. There are lots of stakeholders involved in our work. And so, you know, when we’re talking with folks that are around value based contracts, Right. and taking responsibility for the total cost of care. We’re looking at they’re looking at an infrastructure that allows them to support the whole person in the community, not just in the health care setting, Right. and utilization of the health care setting where it’s appropriate primary care visits and so forth. And so, you know, for when we think about this in states that are really moving forward quickly related to utilization, we’re just talking about medical kind of spend and improving outcomes. You know, we look at lots of different fears, obviously, that the cost and the encounters with the healthcare system is important. So when we do analysis for our customers now, we’ve looked at each utilization or encounters with the healthcare system against what we call the episode of services or service episodes in our system and see the you know, the direct correlation between utilization dropping and social care outcomes increasing Right.. So as more people take hold of this person in the community and address those needs and they become the first point of contact, a food organization or a housing organization, our case manager at a nonprofit versus a 911 or an ambulance ride or an emergency room visit, then those are immediate, tangible, you know, our eyes and improved outcome. We also work with diabetes prevention programs around improving A1C, right. proper nutrition, which is being driven by community based organization, which is helping the health care ecosystem and helping the organizations around the total cost of care. Most importantly, when we’re thinking about this around community communities, think a little bit differently. They may not be thinking about the cost of care and maybe thinking about how fast can I get homeless people, how Right. or how fast can I get people job. And so there’s different impact measures and we have to play in between the two because they literally are directly correlate. And so while we in examples where now policy is coming into play, where certain states are mandating a medical. Discharge plan for homeless patients that they can’t discharge them. Now, that’s most important that you have that effective communication and coordination with those outside agencies, and just that connection is going to be the immediate our ally. So they both work on both sides. And we have to ensure that when people think about community based outcomes versus medical or cost of care outcomes, we kind of have to address both. But that’s what the network does. At the end of the day. And so the things that we improve as a company is around our insights and analytics for both stakeholders to ensure that they’re both getting what we call our life.

Taylor Justice:
And I think another story that is on the top of my mind, specific to Covid-19. And so we work with with a big health plan where they ended up having a member who was incarcerated but was discharged because they tested positive for Covid-19. And so I don’t know if you know much about the re-entry program, but depending on, you know, the level of your crime, you might not be eligible for government assistance. So you’re really dependent upon the nonprofit community to facilitate care. And so this person was transitioned out, obviously tested positive and needed medical attention. But when you think of basic needs. Where is this person going to live? Are they going to have food on the table connecting them to a primary care physician? Maybe some medical supplies once they heal. What’s the next phase? And so this person was discharged within 48 hours, had a place to live. Medical supplies connected to a primary care provider, and then also had transportation set up for them. And then, you know, Post are getting over the Covid-19 and moving forward now, putting them into local Department of Labor and workforce opportunities. And so we talk a lot about building infrastructure, but it’s about these stories of the individuals that need care. And this is one person’s story or multiple needs needed to be addressed and quickly. You can’t do that if you don’t have the appropriate infrastructure on the ground. And that’s one person. Multiply that by 10 or maybe not coming out of the justice system, but just general people connecting to services. You know, as you start to get into the thousands and the hundred thousands, how do you do this at scale? Those personal journeys don’t get lost in the shuffle. They don’t have to tell the story multiple times. They are easily connected to their best fit provider to receive care. And we can track it. They got it or not. And if they don’t, we can redirect. We are putting them into a network that’s going to work for them.

Saul Marquez:
Now, that’s another great example. Thanks, Dan and Taylor. Some great examples of how you guys are really improving outcomes and making business better for everybody involved. I mean, you’ve talked about efficiencies. You’ve talked about having insights and analytics around performance and then accountability, all things that kind of tying really nicely to the overall solution. At the beginning, you mentioned that you had to turn the model on its head and that was a pivotal and a learning experience. Is there anything else that you’ve encountered, any other setbacks that have been formative or have made you guys stronger as a company?

Taylor Justice:
Yeah, I mean, I think loaded question. Yeah. No, I think Dan and I look at maybe problems or setbacks different than most. Maybe it’s because of our military background. But I think you’re always kind of taught to prepare for the worst. And I think in the very beginning, we have always had a vision for the space. We’ve always known what it takes to kind of build teams not only coming from the military, but we both played college athletics as well. And, you know, I think when you put the right people on the bus, in the right seats, not to be cliche, you can handle and weather the storm. And so we’ve had a lot of issues throughout the years. You starting off with the wrong product and then pivoting. That took us making sure that we had the right investors that believe that we were going to solve this problem. And then you bring people on board and you run into situations like a global pandemic and you’re moving everybody virtually and everyone’s got to work from home. And the company that is just resilient and able to just adapt quickly. I think that’s a testament to the team that we built in the culture that we built. And just the folks that when we bring people on, we are very transparent, that we are moving really quickly. We are moving an industry down a particular path. And while we have the vision doesn’t mean that we have everything figured out and we might have an 80 percent solution. So people are expected to go fill those gaps for us. And so that’s part of your culture and that’s part of the team. You know, these hard times and these setbacks don’t feel as hard. And so I think for that, we’ve been able to kind of roll with the punches. And it’s expected, again, when you’re in an emerging market and you’re the leader in that market and everything’s a greenfield in front of you, you know, setting your culture of just making sure you’re a good human, you know, our company values of being human own it and always be collaborating where we’re not trying to solve problems in silos. But the last one is think big. And, you know, the team that we have on board, I don’t look as setbacks here. We look at them as opportunities. And the pandemic here is one of those areas where a lot of companies are restricting. We’re leaning in and we’re we’re investing even more into our growth. And I think, you know, four or five years when people look back at the growth of Unite US and what we’ve been able to do, I really think that they’ll look at the moves that we made during Covid-19 as kind of the the fuel that really ignited our growth.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Yeah. And I love those values and they’re so great. Crystal clear, be a good human. Own it. Think big. I like always be collaborating. That’s a good one. Great, great stuff here. Dan and Taylor, if you think about what you’re most excited about today, what would you say that is?

Dan Brillman:
I think that it is now so apparent how needed this product, this methodology and and this infrastructure is now. And I think Covid-19, similar to I would say maybe even telehealth has accelerated that. And so what I’m really excited is about people that we talk to now are not saying why. What’s the there’s in a directory and a network, which was five years ago. People are now talking about, you know, three steps ahead where we are and having really good conversation around what is the best way to reimburse, you know, what are the different ways to setup models around payment. You know, we’re talking about the next level things around statewide infrastructure to support that because we’ve validated all of these things over the years and they’ve seen the tangible results of them. And so the excitement is it’s not just coming know from from one sector or the other. It’s actually a collective response that’s bringing in bringing it all together. There’s a lot of questions, obviously, of, you know, how how can we elevate the community organizations even further to the same priority level as medical care, which is going to be a continual process and an evolution over time. But people are talking about how to do it now, not just is that even possible. So that’s what really excites me.

Saul Marquez:
Definitely exciting stuff. And you guys are leading the way. So we’re here at the end, guys. And thank you so much for helping us better understand how you guys are approaching the marketplace, how you’re collaborating to improve outcomes and working across multistakeholder groups to make that happen. Really appreciate the insight that you’ve shared. What closing thought would you guys leave us with? And what would be the best place for the listeners to reach out to you if they wanted to continue the conversation?

Taylor Justice:
Yeah, I would say when folks are thinking about social determinants of health. Historically, people try to segment it into, oh, I’m going to invest in a community based organization from a philanthropic or grant perspective, or maybe I’m going to invest in technology. And they and they treat it as this either or. And really what it should be is it’s an and they go they go hand-in-hand. And if you realize that the human and social service landscape is lacking appropriate infrastructure to connect these organizations together because people’s needs are dynamic, while also funding the capacity to continue to build upon those networks, you know, the focus is this is a complicated problem. And there isn’t just one solution. This this really takes always be collaborative and kind of to that that core value that we have. And so I think one thing that we’ve been able to do is, you know, we’re not we’re not just a tech company. We are truly a partner because to bring these organizations to the table, facilitate government health care, community based organization that takes work. And we have a model and a process where we can partner with these big institutions that want to make the appropriate investments in social determinants of health and realize just having a directory and pushing information out there isn’t going to get it done anymore. So, you know, taking an approach of incorporating social care and putting that at the same priority level as health care, those are the types of organizations that we want to work with. And it’s going to take commitments from the folks that subscribe and listen to your podcast to make that a priority. So I think the call to action would be that including social care into your strategy, into the core values of your of your organization, the investment that certain organizations are making. It’s not going to be as simple as kind of just writing checks anymore. It’s about what is your your thought out approach to really solving the needs in a community. And we’re there to help.

Saul Marquez:
Love it, Taylor. Love it. And Dan, appreciate your thoughts there as well. Where can the listener’s best connect with you guys and your company to continue the conversation?

Dan Brillman:
Yeah, of course. So going to uniteus.com is obviously the best. I mean, you have our names, so you shoot that the email as well. I defer. You can always e-mail Taylor. But uniteus.com for sure is the best way to get in touch with us. And we’d love to have conversations with folks that, you know, hearing their their position and their world and how they think about this and how we can think about the effectiveness of our work for them.

Saul Marquez:
Outstanding, gentlemen. Thank you again. Keep up the outstanding work. And folks go to uniteus.com to learn more. And for the full show notes, just go to outcomesrocket.health in the search bar, type in Unite US and you’ll find ways to get in touch with Dan and Taylor to learn more about the outstanding work that they’re doing. Thank you again.

Dan and Taylor:
Thank you. Appreciate it. Thank you.

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Things You’ll Learn Here:
How to use your pain points to improve a system
How to build a community network to help improve healthcare
Building a framework that scales efficiency and visibility in the community level
How to pivot when you don’t have the right product or service

Resource: https://uniteus.com/