Changing Lives by Connecting People to Healthcare Solutions that Work
Episode 462

Brenda Schmidt, Founder at Solera Health

Changing Lives by Connecting People to Healthcare Solutions that Work

Creating a consumer marketplace tailored to help people holistically manage their health

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Changing Lives by Connecting People to Healthcare Solutions that Work

Episode 462

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Value as Service

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Changing Lives by Connecting People to Healthcare Solutions that Work with Brenda Schmidt, Founder at Solera Health transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Changing Lives by Connecting People to Healthcare Solutions that Work with Brenda Schmidt, Founder at Solera Health was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2020.

Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring health care leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket, Saul Marquez is back with you and today, I have an outstanding guest. Her name is Brenda Schmidt. She’s the founder and CEO of Solera Health. Brenda believes there is no one size fits all approach to getting and staying healthy. She founded Solera in 2015 to create a technology platform that matches a person’s unique risks, goals and preferences with tools proven to help them improve their health and prevent, treat or reverse disease. This approach, combined with performance based medical claims payments, has transformed a previously fragmented community and digital health care ecosystem into a consumer marketplace tailored to help people holistically manage their health. You’re probably wondering how can this benefit me? We’re going to get into that. Brenda has received numerous awards, including the MedTech Breakthrough Award for “Best MedTech CEO in 2018”, a 2019 finalist for the EY Young Entrepreneur of the Year and was named by Becker’s Hospital Review as “Woman IT Leaders To Know in 2019”. Brenda is a frequent national speaker and serves on several boards, including the startup Arizona Foundation. The Arizona Bioindustry Association and Health Care Executive Group. So we’re going to have a lot of fun today talking about health care consumerism, hearing Brenda’s insights and the work that they do at Solera. So it’s gonna be awesome. Brenda, so glad you’re here with us.

Brenda Schmidt:
Thanks. So excited to be here.

Saul Marquez:
So let’s let’s chat, Brenda. I mean, what is it that got you into health care to begin with?

Brenda Schmidt:
I think there is just for me a huge opportunity to make an impact. But I love the fact that there’s a lot of problems to solve in health care and it’s constantly changing. I like to think of myself as a lifelong learner. And so the opportunity to both make an impact and continually learn and changing grow is is really intriguing.

Saul Marquez:
I agree. I feel the same way just with we’re doing here in Outcomes Rocket and, you know, chatting with all these awesome leaders like you and and hearing from listeners, you always are learning the opportunities, the learner abounding. Now, before we dive into the content of today’s podcast, Brenda, I would love if if you could just level set with the listeners. Solera Health. What do you guys do?

Brenda Schmidt:
Yeah, it’s that’s our advice. People say what keeps you up at night? And a lot of times it’s people don’t understand what we’ve created in the marketplace and trying to kind of break through the noise. But what we recognized was that health happens where people live, work, play, prey, shop increasingly on their phone and health care happens in doctor’s offices and hospitals. And and people are trying to take better care of their health. And they’re they’re sort of hunting and gathering in a highly fragmented market. So we’ve created a consumer marketplace where we actually match people into the digital apps or community organizations to help them more holistically manage their health in the context of their community. But match them like a match.com to those that meet their specific goals, needs and preferences, and then more importantly, pay those network partners out of medical claims for achieving outcomes. So we’re aligning with value based care in a consumer marketplace that’s reducing the friction for consumers to actually find those digital apps or community organizations that can best meet their needs and help them in their health.

Saul Marquez:
That’s a that’s a great way to summarize the tremendous value that you guys add, Brenda, into the apps that you’re matching patients to. These aren’t necessarily Solera apps or are they?

Brenda Schmidt:
No, Solera doesn’t deliver any programs and services. We’ve we curate and manage a network now that is over 70 digital apps and digital therapeutics condensed from, you know, three hundred twenty five thousand digital apps that now exist in the marketplace, an ecosystem of about thirteen thousand community organizations. But we are the operational engine behind those digital apps that allow them to function really as a think of them as a non-clinical PPO or a non-clinical specialty network paid through claims just like a doctor’s office.

Saul Marquez:
That is cool. That is really cool, by the way. I just want to say that.

Brenda Schmidt:
what we found is, is, you know, from a from new digital therapeutics and digital apps trying to enter the market, they just have a tremendous opportunity to improve access and drive outcomes. But they struggle a lot trying to get the attention of payers, whether that’s an employer or a health system or a health plan. And conversely, the health plans just have vendor fatigue. I mean, they have they’ve they’ve got thousands of folks banging on their door saying, you know, our app is great. So there’s this ecosystem of thousands of point solutions that can make a huge difference in cost and quality of care. And it just seemed to make sense to organize them as a network, just like any other network paid for outcomes. And so really we see our opportunity of reducing the friction for payers to allow them to pay for this ecosystem of digital apps. I’m certainly for the network providers matching logic, driving them qualified leads that we should drive great outcomes on their app and plugging them into our millions of members very easily. So they’re not burning through cash trying to get the attention and contract of the payer. And then for consumers, just really focus on consumers. I mean, I think that’s one of the biggest trends in health care, is how do we make it easy for consumers to take control of their health? We look at it as a do it yourself care plan. How can we be more like TurboTax or LegalZoom, where you don’t necessarily have to see your doctor to prevent, manage or reverse chronic conditions and sleep better, eat better, address some of the social needs and take control of your health yourself? And I think that’s that’s kind of what what we’re trying to build here.

Saul Marquez:
Fascinating. And you also mentioned a component of value based care. And there’s an opportunity to for the app to also share in the delivery of care. You dive into that a little bit?

Brenda Schmidt:
Yeah. So we have what we’ve done is we’ve coated all of the digital apps and digital therapeutics and community organizations to be paid through medical claims.

Saul Marquez:
Is that right?

Brenda Schmidt:
And she gets it. So one hundred percent of our revenue is medical claims. We had medical loss ratio. We have no administrative fees whatsoever. I’m sort of have a visceral reaction to PMP. And I understand people pay for things that way because they can budget. But for me, why there’s no aligned incentive for me to do a great job driving high engagement in outcomes. If I get paid regardless of what the outcomes and value that I’m driving. So if we’re getting paid for actually being able to drive sustained engagement and ultimately clinical outcomes. So twenty five to 60 percent of what salary gets paid and our partners get paid are driven by actually being able to achieve clinical outcomes that our clients believe are driving reduce health care costs of things like systolic blood pressure improvement, weight loss A1C reduction, medication D intensification. Let’s get people off of high cholesterol. Right. And so that that really aligns our ability to pay for performance and pay for outcomes. But I think more importantly, our payers expect us to compress the digital market by creating a standardized set of quality metrics and performance metrics that if a if one of our partners can’t meet those, then it’s a curated network means there’s winners and losers.

Saul Marquez:
Yes, fascinating. So, you know, I’m I’m still on the so the apps that you’ve qualified and now are on the platform, the marketplace that you’ve associated, the services that they provide to codes that are reimbursable.

Brenda Schmidt:
Yes.

Saul Marquez:
Awesome. Awesome. That’s that’s a. Where did you get that idea?

Brenda Schmidt:
Well, it was interesting. We started I bootstrapped a company for 10 years before that. And sometimes Solera looks a little bit like an overnight success. But it was 10 years of a lot of learning and hard work that we got product market fit right. And we got it right because of 10 years of learning and experience and employer health, community health. We went to large CDC, contracted pop health and then working with a large retail pharmacy and one of the early pioneer ratios. And it just became abundantly clear that there needed to be a technology platform that was helping guide people to better health in their community and in really the operational back end of this ecosystem. And so we started with the diabetes prevention program to prove the business model that we can organize highly fragmented community digital apps into a network, match people into that network, and then get them paid through claims. And so we just started with one program, started with diabetes prevention, huge market, you know, one in three U.S. adults. The Centers for Disease Control had already curated a community network for us. And there was so much evidence of those cost savings and outcomes with the diabetes prevention program. We had a line of sight that it was going to be covered by Medicare, which it now is. It’s a part of the preventative service through Medicare, which was driving the creation of CVT ACOs. So that was the genesis for the first three years of the business and really was the one program that allowed us to contract for 60 million lives because the payers didn’t know how to contract with non-clinical providers and they certainly didn’t know how to contract with thousands of them that would meet the diverse needs and geographic needs of their population. And then once we prove that they just came and said, if you can do that with this program, we want you to organize all of our vendors into this model. And they were very helpful with us of getting creative around how we could find codes to use to, because their desire was certainly to have these things that hit their medical loss ratio. So it’s better in the co-creation and co-development, even as we’re getting in things into social isolation and falls prevention and food insecurity, all of those things where coding is claims.

Saul Marquez:
Well that’s that is so interesting. And, you know, just just thinking through the collaboration and I love that you have used the words reduce friction, you know, and you talk about reducing friction for payers, right. You gave them an easier way to contract, reducing the friction for providers and consumers. I love that you focus and use that word.

Brenda Schmidt:
Thank you. Yeah. I mean, I think that’s one of our know how we win is thinking about user experience because it’s something that’s often missing in health care, whether that’s our client experience, like a network provider like Zappos, right, Zappos grew in shoes because it was so easy to be on their platform. So how do we make it really, really easy for new network providers to join the salary ecosystem so we can follow that innovation curve as quickly as we can as new market entrants join? And then how do we make it as easy to use TurboTax as LegalZoom as it is to connect into an ecosystem of providers? And I think more importantly, we’ve really flipped the model. It typically is do a health risk assessment. We’re going to find out your health risks and then we’re going to ask you to do this program that we picked and then we’re gonna pay you a lot of incentive dollars because you really don’t want to do this program. And then we all sit back and wonder why we’re not driving outcomes. And we’ve really flipped it and said, you know what? What do you want to do? What’s your goal? And then we take them through. Their health risks. But you want to coach. No coach. How important is peer support to you? What have you tried before? What’s worked? What hasn’t worked? And then we say we found your best match. We look very much like Match.com. And if it if you enroll in that program, it will service it potentially isn’t the best match for you. You just seamlessly switch into something else. And that’s a very, very different consumer experience in health care.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I would agree. I would agree. Awesome work, Brenda. I mean, kudos to you and your team for what you’ve done. Also wanted to say congratulations on raising forty two million dollars. That’s a big deal. Congrats.

Brenda Schmidt:
Thank you. I think what we appreciated here is those investors were all they were six Cross BlueCross BlueShield plans, all of whom are clients. And I think to then invest that amount of money in Solera. They saw the promise of how we could partner with them to again, to make a difference in the lives of their patients.

Saul Marquez:
So wonderful. And and so what would you say? Brendan needs to be front and center on health leaders agendas as we enter this era of health care consumerism?

Brenda Schmidt:
I think it’s really the focus on data. And there’s so much focus on data and there’s so much data out there. And we talk a lot about interoperability, but how are we actually using that data to help consumers manage their health or make that data meaningful? And so I think that’s something that we think a lot about as we think about digital health and the volume of data that everyone is collecting is how do we make that useful to a variety of different stakeholders across the ecosystem, either to drive better outcomes and feel machine learning and AI or whether that’s a centralized member record or reducing cost of duplicative services. But I think that really the opportunity to to use data to to make it meaningful is something that we spent a lot of time thinking about.

Saul Marquez:
And what are your thoughts, their brand? I mean, how do we make it meaningful? What would you say is the key factor here?

Brenda Schmidt:
I think data provides insight. The data doesn’t change behavior. So there’s a feedback loop is important. I think we can automate so much of what is information, but actually to understand individuals barriers to improving their health takes a high touch creative opportunity. So I would just I think combining the data sets, clinical data with social data, with unstructured data. We think a lot about how we can actually learn so much about an individual that we can actually predict what’s going to work for them. Think about like a stitch fix model is we’ve got archetypes for people that we can actually fuel a recommender engine to be very specific in what we think about as personalized health management without actually having to ask them. I am concerned that we put more and more onus on physicians to have to ask patients either directly or through a health risk assessment and then have some confidence that they’re even answering those questions truthfully. Are we asking the right questions? So we spent a lot of time thinking about how do we combine data sets to get really smart about people, that we can recommend things to them without having to ask them. And so we think about we are having a conversation this year about asthma. And, you know, you ask them if they smoke and know what they’ve gone to the E.R. visit five, gone to the five times while the roommates smoke and never know when to ask that question. And so if we can mine a lot of data to actually know that and that data is out there that fascinates me.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. Yeah. Now, that’s it is fascinating and a great approach in both that social data and the health care data, putting it together, making those insights to make a difference. Give us an example of how Solera has created results already by doing things differently.

Brenda Schmidt:
Yeah, we combined a really broad network in partnership with Blue Shield, California, and we launched that out to 1.8 million of their fully insured population in June 10th, and they had had a pretty comprehensive health management program in place for the last several years. And within the first month we saw a 12 percentage point improvement in engagement by matching people into this marketplace. It was it was just really, really well received that folks, as opposed to saying we picked these solutions for you. Here they are. We’re gonna pay you an incentive. We got huge uptake very quickly without having to offer any incentives that because we were matching people into an ecosystem of things that had value like Weight Watchers for free for a year in a digital scale on a Fitbit. Why would I also pay you an incentive? Is that something that you really want? And we have folks like Verda and Better Therapeutics and start for those individuals who are interested in reversing their diabetes. But we also have folks that are free apps. Think about us as a curated health app store for individuals who are healthy that just want to know, hey, when I go to the app store, I don’t know which one of these to pick. So there’s a trust factor there that if we match you into our ecosystem, I’m just going to drive outcomes. And that’s what we saw early on. As you know, now a couple months in 86 with an 86 percent completion rate compared to a 46 percent completion rate of these different types of programs by matching people into this ecosystem, which is which is a huge upside. And so the payers like look why would I pay anyone incentives anymore. If I’m offering this value ecosystem I can repurpose those tens of millions of dollars into something more valuable.

Saul Marquez:
I mean, I’m just blown away by this. The the results. And then you step back, Brenda, and you just think about it like you asked these people what they want.

Brenda Schmidt:
Right. I mean, I think that, you know, it’s it’s really tricky thing that we do. We asked people what they want because it’s not just the digital you know, we have WeightWatchers and YMCA is and retail, pharmacy and grocery. But we also have areas on aging in your local parks and rec. I mean, people if you think about how people engage in their health, it’s really a personal decision and the opportunity to really find out their needs and preferences. It’s it’s really fascinating. And what we learned in the early user acceptance testing was fascinating to me, too, because I had this really assumption that we needed to ask. The fewer questions that we asked, the less drop off we would have through that process. And what we realized and what we realized from Match.com is that if a consumer perceives that you’re offering them something of value, don’t only answer all kinds of questions. And it actually when we condensed the number of questions we were asking, they didn’t believe that we didn’t trust us, that we knew enough about them to make that best match, which I thought was fascinating. Yeah. So we consider you to use a lot of, you know, roots as a test and learn environment. It’s interesting to continue to do user testing as we’re really trying to just continue to improve consumer engagement and ultimately outcomes.

Saul Marquez:
Very cool. And yeah, I mean, it’s like if you think about it, I mean, if somebody asks me a set of questions that are focused on what I want, I prefer that like you said, giving me actual value in the form of an app or recommendation versus giving me 50 bucks a month.

Brenda Schmidt:
It’s like, yeah, I mean, what the literature shows that, you know, incentives are going to get you to initially do something. They’re not going to actually drive sustained behavior change. And that’s what we want. This isn’t a quick fix. This is long term sustained behavior change. That’s that’s going to make a lifetime of difference. And that’s just a very different approach. And I think what we’re trying to do is, is get people to not progressed to expensive drugs, not progressed to insulin and potentially reverse those conditions. And that is the great a great bit evidence. I actually moderated a American Diabetes Association educational session for primary care physicians. And if you look at the grade B in A, grade A and B evidence for management of diabetes, it is lifestyle medicine. It is 5 to 7 percent weight loss. And the physicians would stand up and say this is the great A great B evidence, which means it’s the best excellent evidence for how to best manage this condition. But that’s really hard and we don’t know how to refer into these organizations. So let’s talk about drugs. And that’s what we’re trying to overcome. The evidence is all about. About meaningful behavior change in lifestyle change.

Saul Marquez:
So great. And so thinking about, you know, you start in 2015, obviously, you you alluded to the 10 year period before that that led to a lot of insights. But within the last four years, beyond that, what would you say is a setback that you experienced that you learned a lot from that’s made you guys better?

Yeah, I think a couple just took one kind of business external and many internal, I think because we focused on diabetes prevention as a specific intervention. We designed the business around that. That one particular program and we got in the market. I don’t know that employers or payers really cared so much that it was this one particular program. They really wanted us to focus on weight loss. So I think that was maybe a product. We had great product market fit, but we had done some things that sort of required you to be clinically eligible for that program to enroll in our ecosystem, as opposed to just saying, you know, if the outcome metric is weight loss, why don’t we just engage people wanna lose weight? So that was probably a little miss on the product market fit. And then I think internally what I’ve learned both from a previous company and this one is not hiring until we feel pain. That really is not. You think, oh, I’m going to hire ahead of scale. And for some things, that makes a ton of sense in technology development in places like that. But I think we I got a little ahead of my skis on some of the functions that we need here ahead of sort of feeling pain that we needed, though. So I’ve gotten a lot more conservative around hiring and making that cash last. Absolutely. As long as it can last.

Saul Marquez:
Now, that’s a that’s important, right? I mean, you’ve got to have a sustainable business model that you could think ahead. But if you don’t have the cash there to hoard it, it says it’s a fine line. Right?

Brenda Schmidt:
Right. Right. So now, you know, now we really where we’ll be four years old in October, really thinking, you know, a line of sight on profitability. And then then we can use cash to to really expand and other things which we’re already doing. I mean, now that we’ve created the technology platform and infrastructure around it, where our initial focus was, was around cardio metabolic diseases, we’re already contracted and quickly moving into other evidence based programs that are being delivered in fragmented ways by a lot of different community and digital partners like sleep, stress, resilience, economic security, social isolation falls, women’s health, chronic pain. All of those things can benefit from our model. And so we’re typically going into our payers and saying, you know, what are your strategic priorities? And in some instances doing the data analytics to help them understand what their strategic priorities should be. And we think of ourselves where the syringe you can put anything you want in that syringe. So we’re quickly expanding beyond our initial focus and that doesn’t require us recreating the infrastructure that we’ve already already developed here.

Saul Marquez:
Now, that’s brilliant. So to date, Brenda, what would you say is one of your proudest leadership experiences in health care?

Brenda Schmidt:
I think it’s been the recognition recently of the opportunity that our business model can actually make a dent in transforming health care, and we all say that, you know, we’re gonna change the world, we’re going to transform health care. I think we have a shot at it. And so I’ve had a lot of opportunities recently to speak, which is to speak at Lincoln Center for Forbes. I was up on stage with Pat Garrity, the CEO of Guywho and Scott Serota is the CEO of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, a Washington Post event. So I think for me, it’s internally creating this great mission driven culture. But next, personally, I think it’s the recognition that that we’ve we’ve got a shot here at making a difference. Yeah, I would use it in the beginning. You know, is is why we we all are in health care.

Saul Marquez:
Oh, for sure. For sure. And that’s definitely validation of the work that you’ve put in the culture you’ve formed there. And so kudos to you. That’s that’s awesome. When did when did that happen?

Brenda Schmidt:
The Washington Post was last year in the Forbes event is actually coming up at the Lincoln Center in December.

Saul Marquez:
Ok, so it’s right around the corner. Awesome. Awesome. Congrats on that. And so tell us about what you believe is most exciting about Solera today.

Brenda Schmidt:
I think it’s the energy of the possibility of making an impact in social determinants of health. And we’ve got a ton of energy in here around that. And there’s just so much noise in the marketplace. And we think that we a lot of the efforts that are happening there say they’re valuable, but they’re insufficient and unsustainable. So how can we use our model to actually create a sustainable revenue model for community organizations who are traditionally grant funded and get them paid through claims without increasing the referral for member referrals, patient referrals into those federally for grant funded programs without an aligned payment mechanism? So this opportunity around thinking about capitated models and payment innovation in this space is really exciting. So we’re starting to have those conversations with our payers and even the federal government around how do we apply not bad fee for service, but how do we recreate or create a value based capitated model for non-clinical services? I spent a lot of my time thinking about that.

Saul Marquez:
And so what does the future look like there? Because I think of the the preliminary efforts being done around housing and food security, air conditioners. I mean, you know, that kind of stuff is impactful. What does it look like in the future?

Brenda Schmidt:
Well, if you think about us as a as a matching platform, which is a matching platform and marketplace, if a payer would give us and making it up a thousand dollars, we can then go to that consumer and say we’ve a bucket of money. You want to spend it on an air conditioner, pest control, home improvement, food, transportation. We actually have the analytics capabilities at the member level, at the patient level to assign what we call a social propensity score, and that’s from zero to 100. And so if you have a social propensity score of 89, we can actually attribute that social propensity score to a hierarchy of needs. And so we can start allocating that money based on what is most likely to impact cost and quality of care. And think about getting paid more on a reduction in clinical and social risk scores as opposed to just fee for service, delivered food, provided housing and then just paying for those services. And so that’s how we’re thinking about that is combining consumerism with a capitated amount, but providing what the consumer wants and what’s going to have the biggest impact, not just, oh, I want to get Mrs. Jones to a doctor’s appointment. So I’m going to cover transportation when she may have a much larger issue that has. That’s that’s a social barrier that’s keeping her from her physician appointment. That’s not maybe not transportation.

Saul Marquez:
Right. Right. Going back to the essence of Solera, just meet the patient where they are. Ask them what they want.

Brenda Schmidt:
Yeah. I mean, we’re a consumer engagement and technology company that’s supporting a platform for a new marketplace. And I think it’s it’s different if people ask me, well, who’s your competition? And and honestly, I’ll say apathy Right. because it’s easy to go out and pick a point solution. I’ve got this one. Oh, I check the box on diabetes. I checked the box on food. I checked the box on transportation. But there’s a difference. Even if you think about transportation, there’s curb to curb sort of the lift health and uber health. They’re doing a great job in this space. But what about the people who need door to door or charity chair? Like, how are we really meeting the consumer’s needs as opposed to just checking the box and saying, I have a transportation solution? And so we’re I think we’re digging three, five, 10 layers deeper around really trying to solve some of these social barriers.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. I think it’s it’s brilliant work. Brenda. And very exciting that the progress is so great. So would love to do the Lightning Round next with you, followed by a book you recommend to the listeners. You ready?

Brenda Schmidt:
Yes.

Saul Marquez:
All right. What’s the best way to improve health care outcomes?

Brenda Schmidt:
Personalization.

Saul Marquez:
What is the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid thinking you can do it alone.

Brenda Schmidt:
There’s just no one that has an end to end solution in health care. So definitely collaboration.

Saul Marquez:
How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change?

Brenda Schmidt:
Just keep learning, read conferences, talk to everyone. Just keep. Keep learning.

Saul Marquez:
What’s an area of focus that drives everything in Solera?

Brenda Schmidt:
Mission.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I love that. I love that. And, you know, thrown I’ll throw another one in there that just occurred to me. What advice would you give to health app makers?

Brenda Schmidt:
I would say find a problem. And there’s so many problems out there. Find a problem in health care and build a solution that’s going to fix that problem. And then I think more importantly for cash. Find a person has the PNL ownership of that problem, don’t develop an app or a solution and go looking for a business case, really find a problem that no one else is solving and go out and build a solution.

Saul Marquez:
Love that. And really, I mean, when you think about the piano ownership of the problem, you’re basically boiling it down to providers and payers.

Brenda Schmidt:
Well, it’s an it’s an actually an individual within a provider or payer. I mean, I have very little tolerance for innovation centers. And in pilots, we never did a pilot. And like because no one in in an innovation center are doing a pilot has penile responsibility or aligned incentives around scaling the solution. So I a business owner who is feeling pain every day because that problem is hitting their PNL and go in and solve that.

Saul Marquez:
Man, that is gold. If you’re listening to this and you’re thinking about starting an app or you’re already starting your app or your you know, you’ve made your app and you’re trying to get it out there. Think about this. This is I mean, you really have to think about this insightful advice. Find somebody that has piano ownership around that problem. Love that. What book would you recommend, Brendan, play bigger?

Brenda Schmidt:
It really is our guidebook here. It’s it’s about it’s as dreamers and pilots, but it’s a pilot and I guess pirates. It’s about how to create a market category that uses a lot of examples, not in health care. That’s by Al Remington and Dave Peterson. We actually all read that book. I gave that book to everyone. So it’s a great if you’re a dreamer and you are thinking big. Read that book. The other book and this is a quick read. Not in health care. It’s called Value as a Service. Love that book. It’s about if I’m contracting with you and I’m providing service that’s driving outcomes and value for you, then how do we. How do we align around a shared set of common goals to drive the maximum value from that relationship? It’s a great little book.

Saul Marquez:
Brilliant. Some great book recommendations there. Brenda, we thank you for those folks. Obviously, you know, just go up to outcomesrocket.health in the search bar type in Solera and you’ll find the entire transcript with Brenda Schmidt as well as links to all the resources that we’ve discussed here. Brenda, this has been fun. I really appreciate you jumping on with us. And we’d love if you could just leave us with the closing thought and then the best place for the listeners could get in touch with you or the company to learn more.

Brenda Schmidt:
I would just say for everyone, this is a little cliché from Steve Jobs. But but don’t think better, think different. Like let’s think differently about health care.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Love the simplicity but power of the message. Brenda and and as far as a place to get in touch, should they go to your Website?

Brenda Schmidt:
Probably reach me out on LinkedIn. I’m a little bit of a LinkedIn junkie, so if you direct message me, I’ll direct you back. So Brenda Schmidt on LinkedIn or feel free to email me Brenda.Schmidt@SoleraNetwork.com.

Saul Marquez:
Outstanding, Brenda. This has been a privilege and really thank you for for the insights and the work that you’re doing to make health care better. Appreciate you.

Brenda Schmidt:
Thanks so much. I’ll take care. Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast.

Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.com for the show notes, resourses, inspiration and so much more.

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Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp3). Easily convert your mp3 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2020—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp3 to text, try Sonix today.