Holistic Care and Optimizing Your Body: The 5 Point Model System
Episode 472

Sangeeta Pati, Founder and Medical Director at SaJune Institute for Restorative and Regenerative Medicine

Holistic Care and Optimizing Your Body: The 5 Point Model System

Empowering patients to optimize their own health

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Holistic Care and Optimizing Your Body: The 5 Point Model System

Episode 472

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Sangeeta Pati, Founder and Medical Director at SaJune Institute for Restorative and Regenerative Medicine transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Sangeeta Pati, Founder and Medical Director at SaJune Institute for Restorative and Regenerative Medicine was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2020.

Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring health care leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the podcast. Saul Marquez here and I’m so excited to present to you today’s guest. Her name is Dr. Sangeeta Pati. She’s a President and Medical Director at an outstanding company called the SaJune Institute for Restorative and Regenerative Medicine. Her career has started as as a doctor in OB/GYN, who practice for more than 28 years, 15 of them being in regenerative medicine. Her 5 point model system was created at SaJune Institute for Restorative and Regenerative Medicine, where her team has treated thousands of patients and perfected protocols to empower patients to optimize their own health. So Jean became a site for integrative, functional doctors to train in 2007. Since then, they’ve trained thousands of doctors through workshops and over 100 in a one on one clinical preceptorship program. Dr. Pati has developed a supplement line MD Prescriptives, which simplifies the patient protocols to the least number of quality pills for the most effectiveness in today’s world of reactive medicine. It’s approaches like Dr. Pati’s that should make us think and consider different approaches to the whole patient. And so with that, I want to I want to go ahead and give Dr. Pati a warm welcome. So glad that you could join us today.

Sangeeta Pati:
Thank you so much. It’s a great day.

Saul Marquez:
It really is.You said it’s a little cold in Orlando where you’re where, you know.

Sangeeta Pati:
It’s cold and sunny and we have no right to complain. We’re just. Temperature goes down to 60 degrees and everybody’s freezing over here.

Saul Marquez:
Oh, my gosh, I love it. I spent some time in Florida and loved every minute of it. And it’s a great place. It is a very great place.

Sangeeta Pati:
Yeah, I’ve decided I’m a Floridian now. I’ve lived here now for 15 years. I lived in the Northeast for until then. Until fifteen years ago.

Saul Marquez:
Wow. Well, kudos to you. You made some moves and now you’re in a warm place getting some more sun with your work almost three decades. What inspires your work in health care?

Sangeeta Pati:
Yeah, I love that word inspires because I continue to be inspired. And I think that what inspires it really is the energy and the hope with which patients come through the door to see us. And that is the spark.That’s the fire.

Saul Marquez:
I love that very patient centric. What would you say in your journey was a thing that you potentially overcame and strengthened that inspiration?

Sangeeta Pati:
Oh, there probably were a lot of occurrences, starting with I’m a first generation born to Indian parents and I ended up getting educated around the world, including in a boarding school in India where I contracted and settled at the Capitol and got to see the inside of a hospital for months and months on end. And my father is a physicist. He always thought I was going to be a physicist. But I think there was another plan, obviously. So that is what inspired me to go into medicine. And I started to see different formats right there and then came back to the United States, ended up studying and training as an obese. You I-and at Georgetown. Great education and went into private practice and then got interested in the nonprofit international scene. So I managed to have a position with a company called EnGender Health that had a large grant to lower maternal mortality around the world and funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. So that’s when I had an opportunity to travel and actually work in Kenya and Tanzania, Macau,Thailand, just many countries around the world. And I worked mostly with midwives and traditional birth attendants and also ministries of health. And it became very clear that my toolbar of pharmacy and surgery wasn’t really addressing the underlying cause. And additionally, was not a sustainable way to practice or help anybody to get really well. So when I transitioned back into really practicing medicine, I started to get some signs and messages that I really should be looking for causes. And in 2003, I actually stopped practicing obstetrics and gynecology and delivering babies and started to practice restorative regenerative medicine to empower patients to be in the driver’s seat for their own health.And of course, it was a learning curve because I didn’t know anything when I started in 2003 in terms of the book knowledge. But I knew in my heart that if you restore the body to optimal, it can heal itself. So that was the premise on which we rode. And I guess that was kind of the journey that got me to the point of practicing this causal approach. And when you mentioned the five point model system earlier to the five point model system is really a system by which we optimize the mind, both the subconscious and the conscious. And I really refer to it as the heart mind, because the heart is driving most of the subconscious. The physical body oxygenation, that’s the second one. And then optimizing the fuel tank of hormones and the fuel tank of nutrition and then daily detoxification. So those are the five areas. And when I say optimize the nutrition, I’m not talking about optimize into a normal range. I’m talking about the seventy first percentile and above, because that’s where you get protection. So that’s the five point model system. And for me it was really easy to start with the hormones because I’m in OB-GYN, right?

Saul Marquez:
Right.

Sangeeta Pati:
But slowly I realized that without enough selenium iodine you don’t activate the thyroid pathways and if you’re not clearing the liver and the kidneys, you’re doing daily detoxification with a hundred ounces of water. You won’t have the full effect. And of course, everything starts with whereas our heart, mind and oxygenation. So that is how that transition occurred. So we ended up practicing in a way where we we don’t just do one thing or the other. We’re empowering people to optimize all 5 areas and to get to the point where they really don’t need us that much.

Saul Marquez:
Well, I think it’s a powerful framework. And the experiences that you’ve had, Sangeeta, around the world really opened up your perspective and the options that we could consider as we think about taking care of ourselves or the patients we serve. Who’s a mentor that’s made a big impact in your life?

Sangeeta Pati:
Why do I’m really fortunate, I’ve had a lot of mentors, really, of course this would be obvious, but everybody starts off with their mother and their father as mentor.And my father’s an elementary physicist who really imparted a lot of information about quantum physics. I’m fascinated by that. And it’s funny, I talked to him yesterday at 6:00 p.m. California time and he’s still sitting in Stanford doing physics, working and he’s above 80 years old. So he is not going to let that go. Having having parents who are really enthusiastic about certain things makes for a very good mentor. And my mother, you know, writes children’s books in astronomy. And those were my beginning pointers. As time went on, I ended up having an uncle who was a physician in a medical college in India, and I got a real awakening there when I went as a medical student and realized that my clinical skills at diagnosis were nowhere close to what they were for them. They were ahead of me because they relied much less on the diagnosis. They don’t have a diagnostic. So they had to be able to move their stethoscope to diagnose stuff. Right.. Which I was doing too, but not at that level. And then, you know, as that went on, I was very fortunate. Like I took a job, as, OB-GYN and and within a couple of years I got fired, which was great. I wasn’t bringing enough money because I was looking to how to save the patient money. But that was great, because then, you know, Dr. Aglord, who was practicing in the D.C. area took me under his wing. And he’s the one who allowed me to have like a job where I would I would be able to work abroad. And then, you know, roll forward. I would say one of the biggest mentors I had in regenerative and restorative medicine was the late Dr. Robert Marshall from Premier Research Laboratory in Austin. And I met him over a decade ago and started to learn deep information about the energetic systems and the nutritional systems and the nutritional forms and just amazing stuff.So I would say that he was a major highlight in terms of this journey into what I call really regenerative medicine just means it’s called old medicine. It’s like you’re looking for the cause you’re not looking for, OK. I have a headache. I’m going to take a Tylenol. But.

Saul Marquez:
Right. treating symptoms.

Sangeeta Pati:
Right, is it because I’m dehydrated or is it because I don’t have enough magnesium? Is my vascular system unstable because of some? There’s so many great easy causes.Nobody has a Tylenol deficiency. Right.. So he was a big mentor. And then more recently, Dr. John Apsley has been one of my mentors and I actually ended up getting engaged to him because he was so smart. I’m like, I’m not letting go. So I would say those have been, you know, those would be the highlights, but I’ve had a lot of mentors in between and they’ve always been brought to me just I call it the universe is doing it for me. But we all get fortunate enough. I feel very blessed for the people I had in my life to teach me.

Saul Marquez:
That’s great.

Sangeeta Pati:
But I also I also feel like they continue. Like, I don’t feel like, you know, when people pass that you lose that knowledge, because I have felt Dr. Marshall speaking to me and, you know, passing me things on very tough patients. And I still feel that.

Saul Marquez:
That’s so great. Yeah. You know, it’s the power of mentorship is huge. And glad you had a chance here to recognize many of the people in your parents to mentors, to your fiance. So that’s great. And so today the the challenge is the symptom treating and you guys are digging into causal medicine. Tell us what holds people back from digging deeper into causal medicine and its benefits?

Sangeeta Pati:
Yeah, that’s a really great question. I believe that inherently we are actually programmed to look for causes. If you go back ancient and sometimes I call this path, I’m on the ancient future because if you really look like a lot of the things that we go back to or things we just knew from before. It turns out that if you look, you go into any physician’s family and see how they treat a cold. Nobody goes running for an antibiotic first. They always start with bumping up their immune system with extra fluids, with vitamin C, with zinc, probiotics. These are things that are inherent common sense in ancient cultures. You go back four thousand years, they were doing the same stuff. So I think that we are actually as human race, programmed to not only with all the knowledge that we need to keep ourselves well and to heal ourselves, but also that’s that’s what our heart wants to do. Most of us do that. You know, nobody is you know, you get a sore throat, you’re gonna do a saltwater gargle first, Right. usually. And I think that it really speaks volumes that in our practice, just about a quarter of our patients are health care practitioners and their spouses and families. So they are looking for the same medicine. I think that they’ve done a lot of interviews and questionnaires of physicians and as to their first choices for a lot of things and most people choose equally, they’re not choosing pharmacy and surgery first.So I think in response to your question of what holds us back, what’s happened over time is there’s a certain amount of indoctrination that’s occurred with the what I would call the Western medical system in some way. And the Western medical system is not as empowering to people because it requires you to go to somewhere to get a diagnosis and have somebody give you that diagnosis. And I think that, you know, physicians are really at their wits end these days because of the way, you know, our medical system’s broke. It really is. It’s very difficult for even people who are practicing conventionally. It’s just it makes you sick. Like doctors are finding out that’s a fact. And I think that if you look at it, that burnout comes from a chronic stress response, and that’s a cause. And most people recognize that. So on the one hand, I feel that there has been a certain amount of, if you can call it holding back from looking at causal stuff, but it’s always been there. And I feel that, yes, there has been a middle decades where we have relied very heavily on the concepts of pharmaceuticals and surgery. But I believe as a human race, we’re actually starting to take our power back that way and become extremely knowledgeable about how to really optimize the function of this body so that it can keep you healthy, happy, energetic, and free of chronic degenerative diseases.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I love that. And so what do you think is an example of maybe how you guys at this SaJune Institute, have you helped others overcomes challenge and and maybe a good story here would would be great to hear.

Sangeeta Pati:
How you overcome the challenge of, well, one of the things I’m not sure I understand the question exactly.

Saul Marquez:
But I mean, you wouldn’t know what age of traditional health care system and learning the pharma and surgery right away.

Sangeeta Pati:
Yeah, I think for us that has become a lot easier because the people who are walking through this door have already set the intention that they’re looking for. Addressing the causes, otherwise they wouldn’t come through this door because it’s not an easy journey. We are out of network providers, which means people have to cloud hard earned money to see us. Our programs are not simple. If you have fibromyalgia, I’m not going to be able to prescribe Lyrica for you. That might be a lot more simple, but your program’s going to be a lot more complicated. So it’s a self-selecting group that we don’t end up really doing a lot of convincing because it’s a self-selecting group because either they decided to go towards looking for causes because maybe they’re having side effects of medications. And I’ll give you a couple of examples about that. Or because they haven’t gotten well using all the different approaches. So they’re trying something new. Right.. This might be a last resort to a lot of times people are looking for causal medicine or regenerative restorative, whatever your functional. There’s so many names for it. A lot of times people look for those approaches because nothing else has worked. And that number is growing because our population is getting sicker and we’re seeing more young people under the age of 25 than I’ve ever seen before. I would say out of like the new patients I’m seeing, I’m going to tell you that a quarter of them are now under the age of 25.

Saul Marquez:
Why do you think that is?

Sangeeta Pati:
We’re sick. The generation behind us is sicker than us. And there are a lot of reasons for that. If you go back to the 5 point model that we had sort of talked about a little bit. One of the things that you’ll see is that modern civilization is like man’s greatest disease, if you will, because we push ourselves to do 36 hours of things in a 24 hour day. Right. And how, you know, this is when you look at long living cultures around the world. You get a chance to see that long living cultures. They are climbing mountains until above the age of 100 and their chronic degenerative changes at a cell level occur way later than ours are as is occurring around age 35. So you know that it’s possible. So then you start looking at what’s the cause. And of course, one of the causes is that the speed of the engine is too high. That’s the physical and the mental stressors that are there. The other part of the picture is that we’re exposed to over a hundred thousand manmade toxins, environmental toxins from various sources that we never were exposed to before. And the biggest one coming up on the horizon is going to end up being the five G. And get into that later. But and then, of course, you know that the USDA reported almost a 60 percent decline across the board in every nutritional category over 50 years. So from 1950 to 1999, I think they did the study.So that means that if you got your nutrition, whatever nutrition you got from one apple in 1950, you might have to eat three or four apples to get the same amount of vitamin A and whatever else you were getting from it. So our soil is depleted because we’re utilizing mechanisms that don’t re-Tweet the soil. So those would be the nutshell of sort of the reason. So all these young kids are walking around with basically adrenal thyroid stress, nutritional deficiencies, and they’re bombarded with a lot of chaos, which we teach them how to medicate by the response. So, you know, so to give you some examples, I think that might be really useful and I’ll give you some examples in every age group. But I think, you know, I’ve treated over the past three years, the biggest issue that we’re seeing in these young people is either what’s known as attention deficit disorder or anxiety and depression. Those are the big and fatigue. There’s the big ones. And if you look at the United States, you’ll see that energy drinks are the number one growing drink. Nobody’s deficient in Redfield.

Saul Marquez:
And they care for you.

Sangeeta Pati:
Yeah. And you’re not economical. So they die. It’s got you know, it’s it’s not going to make up for what’s actually missing. Fatigue, anxiety, depression. Those are big ones among young people. And if you talk to teachers these days in schools and grade schools, they’ll tell you that a good quarter to a third of their students are on some kind of medication.

Saul Marquez:
Which is terrible.

Sangeeta Pati:
That never used to be the case. Right. So how do you deal with that? So what ends up happening is that the parents that come here when their children are diagnosed with those things, they have a tendency to double check by bringing the children first. Right.

Saul Marquez:
So instead of medicating them, they bring them to you.

Sangeeta Pati:
They bring them to us. And of course, there’s a bit of a battle because you see, if the kid is in college and everybody who’s on Ritalin or Adderall is actually getting better grades than the people who are not, you end up having a wave or children in college. You actually go to the college psychologist or whatever, and they’re looking for a prescription of Adderall and they’re and they will get it. So, you know, sometimes the kids themselves aren’t convinced because we’re not going to give them just a pill or UNINTELLIGIBLE a bunch of. So, you know, for example, I have a 19 year old kid exactly like that. A young boy who’s both parents come to us and he actually was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis at a very young age. And his parents had brought him to us and we ended up helping him to regenerate his intestinal tract. And he ended up being symptom free until he went to college. Right. So he goes to college and eating whatever they eat and starting to have problems with focus. And he wants to get on the Adderall. His parents brought him here. So I had a discussion with him and said, look, you know, of course, there’s the best part about where you are right now is that you have options. Yes. You can take the Adderall. Yes, you can. There’s one hundred different approaches that is going to give you the result. And some of them are going to be easier than others. So you get to choose what it is that you think is going to suit you. But I’ll tell you what you can do from our perspective. So on a mind level, I talk to him about heart rate variability and getting his heart rate variability from what’s called a incoherent rhythm to a coherent rhythm. And if I could paint this out for you and you, a coherent rhythm is a very scattered pattern versus a coherent heart rate. Variability is a nice sign way. And the difference is that since 70 percent of your nervous system, what is in the intestines, if you have an incoherent read.

Saul Marquez:
Does it? I don’t know them?

Sangeeta Pati:
Yes, the intestines are pulled the major part of the nervous system. So that’s that’s kind of the connection with IBS. That’s why you can’t treat IBS with a pill if you do not change the heart rate variability. Every time there’s a stress and heart rate variability is incoherent, the person will have IBS symptoms. Right. So it’s a flipping that. Heart rate variability. And so I said, you know, we can learn how to change the heart rate variability.That’s the mind aspect, right? From the toxin aspect. That’s the second part of the five point model. We can teach you how to increase your P.H. of your urine so that urine alkaline state and you’re rid of the toxin because you’re eating GMO foods if you’re eating from the cafeteria in college. And we can teach you how to shield your phone. There’s actually these kids are exposed to so much of this Wi-Fi and electronics and actually, so are we, so we’ve we have quite a lot of different mechanisms by which we can help them either with their phones or their space and things like that, just so that they don’t have the kind of electrical load on their nervous system that’s driving this hyper. It’s like if you look, I don’t know if you’ve experienced this, but I know physicians around the United States are experiencing this massive flood of depression, anxiety that’s occurring in these young people. Or die actually is responsible for a lot of the strange things that we’re seeing and hearing about. But we teach them we teach them how to avoid plastics around their food, to eat organic because you avoid pesticides and fertilizers. And we think Roundup was a problem, but it’s going to end up being every fertilizer and pesticide. They don’t belong in the human body, right. They don’t belong in our water system. So I just talk to you about the five-point model. So for this gentleman, we taught him how to do it.He ended up choosing to do to work with us because we done it before. And he knew that it was about getting his power back. So he doesn’t have to keep going to a medical system and, you know, feeling like he doesn’t have a lot of options. Right. So he just pledged to work with us. And usually we tell these young people and me they vary from age. You know, we have infants in this practice, but usually right around the age of 11 or 12, I ask the parent that’s bringing the child in to step out of the room, because the relationship really has to be that this person wants to do this is not it. These are not easy. So mind what, boys? We he engaged in the heart rate variability program and ended up learning how to do that. That actually took away a lot of the symptoms on the gastric pathway. And then he was absorbing more nutrients. So, of course, the focus goes up on the toxin part. We taught him how to increase his P.H. mostly with drinking one hundred ounces of water with pink, salt and lemon in it and making sure that the morning P H is above seven point eight. We put a shield around his phone. Nutrition wise, we did a blood test that most of the insurances cover and we showed it was nutritional statuses and then corrected it. Our belief is that your main way to correct nutrition is with your food because nature packages it much better than a supplement.But we also used supplements. The big ones are magnesium, acetyl Torin 8, which is specifically targeted to the nervous system in a very good way. And fish oil we used to and teret coated fish oil and correct it all his B vitamin deficiencies is on a nutritional pattern showed what we call a typical gastric pattern where you’re not absorbing because you have gaps in the lining. Some people call it leaky gut and. In the hormonal area, it turned out that because he was having a chronic stress response, his thyroid function was off. So this always ends up being kind of a interesting piece. So all the thyroid numbers were totally borderline and he had antibodies to the thyroid. So a lot of people would maybe not treat that right. But we decided that we were going to treat thought temporarily until he got everything else right. And then we took him off the thyroid. But also, he wasn’t sleeping at night. He was up. It’s kind of funny. These kids describe things like they’re texting each other. Are you sleeping and the person’s responding. Yes, I’m sleeping. How could you possibly be sleeping? Great spot. And then physical wise, just teaching people to breathe. But what happens when they go into these programs, their 90 day programs, is they end up taking a lot of the power back themselves. And they barely then they barely see us. They sometimes see us twice a year. But in the beginning, we might be seeing them every other week.

Saul Marquez:
That’s success. Get them out the door. I love it Sangeeta.

Sangeeta Pati:
And I could give you many I don’t know how long we have. But,.

Saul Marquez:
You know, know that was that was brilliant. And what I would like to do is if the listeners want to have some more examples, let’s invite them to go visit your site or wherever you believe would be at a place that they could engage you further. What’s that place?

Sangeeta Pati:
Well, they certainly can look at this SaJune.com web site and I do have a presence on LinkedIn and put my name? And usually I respond to that. So those are the two good ways, I think.

Saul Marquez:
Beautiful. So, folks, check out the SaJune Web site. It’s s a j u n e .com. There you’ll find videos of the things that Dr. Pati is up to Insomnia treatment, Tekesyndrome, depression and anxiety, hormones. A lot of really great stuff. So if this has piqued your interest, check out what she and her team are up to sajune.com but also in the show notes we’ll have a link to her LinkedIn profile and the website just go to outcomes rocket.health and type in, SaJune, s a j u n e. You’ll find it all there. If you had a you know, you obviously shared your your 5 point model heart, mind, physical body, hormones, nutrition and daily detox. We’re going to be taking that away here. But what closing thought would you leave all the listeners with as they think about wellness for themselves, their loved ones and their patients?

Sangeeta Pati:
Well, I believe that every human being should be in the driver’s seat for their own health, and they have the ability to do that. So that’s what I encourage everybody to do. Whatever mechanism they use to keep their power in terms of their utter confidence and trust in their own knowledge and their own intuition and insight.

Saul Marquez:
That’s wonderful. Great call to action. Something that I’m taking to heart. And I hope everybody listening does, too.

Sangeeta Pati:
I would love to say one would think so. It’s a 5 point model. We know that re approximates the long living because it re approximates how the long living really regenerate, which is by taking advantage of the gifts of nature and the gifts of nature. If you look at that, those five points are the sun exposure to the circadian rhythm of the sun, the earth and the soil is the nutrition. And that means getting yourself into that earth, planting our stuff, getting into this ground detoxification structure of water, oxygen, oxygen, oxygen, and most importantly, the vibration of joy. Because the vibration of joy is what programs the structure of water that’s around your DNA and turns on and off the genes promoter and suppressor agent is the ultimate epigenetics is the control of the genes that’s in your hands by simple things like these five things that you can do to reconnect to nature. So I’ve had a lot of fun. And if you want to hear a little bit more about what I just said, there’s actually a podcast on our Web site that interviews me on this exact topic.

Saul Marquez:
Very interesting. And I really like the way you phrased that, the gifts of nature taking advantage of those gifts of nature. That’s really what the 5 point model is about. And wow, what a great invitation, folks. I encourage you to go check that out. I’ll definitely be checking it out right after we finish. And Sangeeta, just want to say thanks again for joining us.

Sangeeta Pati:
Thank you so much. Thank you. And God bless everybody who’s listening to this.

Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast. Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.com for the show notes, resources, inspiration and so much more.

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