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Advocating Advanced Learning Among Nurses and Nurse Leaders
Episode

Trish Richardson, Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions at Relias

Advocating Advanced Learning Among Nurses and Nurse Leaders

In this episode, we are privileged to host the outstanding Trish Richardson, Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions at Relias. 

Trish shares her journey from a stockbroker to a  board-certified nurse executive. She explains how her work at Relias makes a difference in the lives of many patients. She emphasizes that all nurses have a voice whether they have a title and continue encouraging and supporting others.   

Trish is an incredible nursing leader and strategist, and there are so many things to learn from her, so please tune in!

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Advocating Advanced Learning Among Nurses and Nurse Leaders

About Trish Richardson

Trish is the Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions at Relias. She is also a candidate for President-Elect for North Carolina Nurses Association. 

Trish holds a master’s degree, a bachelor’s, RN, multiple certifications, and is a board-certified nurse executive, certified medical-surgical registered nurse with close to 30 years of business and health care experience holding several leadership positions and clinical education, operations, management, and oversight for numerous successful organizational change initiatives.

Fun fact: Trish was a licensed stockbroker and also worked in corporate accounting.

Advocating Advanced Learning Among Nurses and Nurse Leaders with Trish Richardson, Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions at Relias: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Advocating Advanced Learning Among Nurses and Nurse Leaders with Trish Richardson, Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions at Relias: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Rebecca Love:
Hi everyone, this is Rebecca Love with Outcomes Rocket Nursing, and today I am so excited to bring to you a new guest. Trish Richardson owns a master’s degree, a bachelor’s R.N., multiple certifications and is a board-certified nurse executive, certified medical-surgical registered nurse with close to 30 years of business and health care experience holding several leadership positions and clinical education, operations, management, and oversight for numerous successful organizational change initiatives. Currently, she is a candidate for President-elect for North Carolina Nurses Association. So exciting and a fun fact – while her health care career spans both acute and post-acute care, before nursing, Trish was a licensed stockbroker and also worked in corporate accounting. But that story is for another day because Trish today currently works as the Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions for Relias, and we are so excited to have you here. Trish, thank you for being here.

Trish Richardson:
Absolutely, Rebecca. It’s an absolute joy to be here. Happy to be here with you.

Rebecca Love:
Well, here is what we want to know. I mean, you have had a tremendous career and your career did not start first in nursing. And I’m really curious to hear how you got into nursing and what inspired your work today in health and health care.

Trish Richardson:
Oh my goodness, I would say so. First off, yeah, I have. I started out as a stockbroker. I really did. I always wanted to get into accounting, and I still love accounting, so I’m kind of like that nurse who was a stockbroker first. That’s pretty much me. So I have this business mindset to everything that we do, but it’s wrapped with a clinical wrapper. I always wanted to get into accounting, loved finance, worked as a corporate accountant as well. Stay at home mom. That was an opportunity to be able to be home with my boys and my sister is a nurse. She’s younger than I am, but she has a few years more experience than I do. My mom always wanted to be a nurse, so my sister said, Still stay home with the boys, come work it out with us at Rex, you know, on the weekends, do the heart monitors. I’m like, A – I don’t like blood. B -still don’t like blood, but I’ll try it. So I got in and I never looked back. So I started out with my associate’s degree in nursing and my bachelor’s in nursing, and then my master’s in nursing leadership and health care administration. So 17 years in acute space, two and a half in post-acute, and now working as the Director of Post-Acute Care Solutions at Relias with clinical oversight and driving the post-acute care practice for our organization. What I love about nursing though, my whole idea is bettering the life of another. When I was a stockbroker, I would prepare these individualized financial plans and profiles for my clients, and I loved it. I would literally sit at the kitchen table, walk in with them, talking with them, helping them to secure financial health and wellness. With nursing, It’s that holistic view of their overall wellness picture, so caring for another in a different environment really is the same for me. I still get to care for somebody else. That’s the goal in the end.

Rebecca Love:
That is really interesting, from stockbroker into basically the world of nursing and seeing it through the lens of caring for another in just a very different, very different … You’re dealing with financial assets on one side and then you’re dealing with human health on the other. So, you know, today, tell us just a little bit about how you got to where you are today. And could you tell us a little bit also about the scope of what you do in your organization and what you work on a day-to-day basis?

Trish Richardson:
Oh my goodness, how much time do we have? I’m just kidding. Oh my gosh. Wow. So yeah, when I moved over from finance into nursing, I was at the bedside literally. I worked nights for about nine and a half years on an Intermediate Care Pulmonary Nephrology Unit, loved everything that I did, was able to move up as an Assistant Manager and then into education at the service line, and then led multiple initiatives for our hospital. I was there for 17 years and I thought, there’s more, there’s got to be a little bit more. And so I left the acute space, went into corporate clinical leadership in the post-acute space as an education consultant and director of education, and was responsible for the education and training and learning and development for sixteen thousand employees. It was a big ask and it introduced me at that moment to Relias. So that was about six years ago. Honestly, at that point, I thought, what a great organization. Kind of kept that in the back of my head, moved in to work for Allscripts for about a year and a half, and led a clinical excellence team there. We were doing work in the acute space, looking at predictive analytics and rolling forecasts and budget and what decisions that nurses make at the moment affect everything. We’re talking overhead. We’re looking at the pounds of laundry that you’re using and why the decisions are being made in the finance office, why they’re not communicated to the nurses, because we know how to make a decision. We know what’s right for our core, our patients. That was my role, is to talk with them about how our tool would help impact the nurses and empowered nurse leaders on the front lines to make decisions in real-time and really get through some of the red tape of clinical variation or labor variation, justify the variances. Rather than doing that, you’re actually proactively leaning in and adjusting on the fly. So it’s pretty cool and then had an opportunity to come and work as a director of post-acute care solutions for Relias. I am so thrilled to be here for so many reasons because the work that we’re doing is actually impacting millions and millions of lives around the world. This is pretty exciting. So my role as director is again advancing that clinical practice, our solutions for post-acute care. Also collaborating, working in part with our marketing, our enablement dimension, actually speaking at our annual convention next month. They are very supportive of me in my pursuit as a candidate for president-elect of NCNA, So, yeah, it’s been just it’s been a blur, but it’s been such a blessing to get to where I’m at.

Rebecca Love:
Well, I love one that you are running for a leadership position within our nursing leadership organizations because it is so important that those of us in health care and those who have been on the corporate side start to be more involved with our nursing associations because one thing that I know when I talk to nursing associations, there are over eighteen hundred of them across the United States. This is a massive amount. Nurses really don’t understand all the time the business of healthcare, and the truth is to make that impact can be absolutely critical. What are doing either with Relias and also your goals for the future of nursing and running it for president of one the North Carolina Nursing Association, what do you do different and better than perhaps what currently exists in the market today?

Trish Richardson:
Oh my gosh. For me, the biggest thing is again, going back and being able to impact lives, whether it’s the patients’ lives or residents’ lives, community as a whole. I take a different view of nursing leadership because you don’t have to have a title. I come down on that and I spoke at the convention last year and I talked about cultivating finance and nursing collaboration, kind of can’t take the business hat off the nurse or the nurse out of the businesswoman. So for me, it’s taking the other perspective, flipping the conversation and going, OK, how do we make it right for the entire organization? How are the nurses who desire and aspire to be leaders who are emerging leaders in and of their own right don’t have a title? And then from the nursing perspective, as student nurses, how do I get them engaged today? What can I do to help them to understand that they need to be heard now and we celebrate that? We also need them to become engaged every day after graduation. Once the letters RN, when they’re wet on your badge and you’re there, you just want to take care of people. You need to continue to take care of your profession and to encourage this and inspire others to come alongside you. And I don’t call it the fight. I call it the journey to nursing excellence. I don’t call it the fire. It’s a journey, for example, like the Save Act in North Carolina, trying to push forward legislation to allow nurse practitioners advanced practice registered nurses to be able to practice to the fullest extent of their scope. We’re not changing their scope of practice. We’re just taking some of the archaic laws and burdensome financial regulations on top of that, making it easier for them to get out into the rural parts of our communities and expanding access, taking care of health equity, if you will, and righting the inequity that is apparent and appalling, in my opinion, that we’re not caring for each other in North Carolina across all one hundred beautiful counties. There’s no reason why we shouldn’t be able to get out there so the Save Act is important and inspiring others that are in non-traditional roles of nursing. My perspective again is looking at each individual, not in their vertical, but breaking down the silos at the student level, working with public health nurses, school nurses. Why don’t we have school nurses back in the schools again? Not seventy-six schools in one half of one county, really encouraging more of that involvement across the board, across all areas and all paths of nursing because it’s not just immediate bedside. You’ve got nurses and leadership. We’ve got the biggest nurses on boards- council. The big initiative that we did hit 10000 nurses on boards, and I’m proud to be a part of three different boards right now. So excited to champion and encourage others who never thought their voice really mattered, who had never had the opportunity to speak up and speak out on issues that are relevant and important to them, and just being their champion, reaching across the proverbial aisle and being a voice of the legislature, you know, getting involved there and encouraging. Talking to universities and helping them to understand the value of how we need to value our students coming up. Talk about being active, not activism, getting involved early and often in the legislature. Again, my take on it is just to be more open-minded to all viewpoints in celebrating the diversity of nursing as it is today and helping to expand access throughout North Carolina, and encouraging others on the journey to their own nursing excellence.

Rebecca Love:
Trish, there is such a wealth of knowledge there and opportunity to look at how you’re looking at North Carolina and how you expand access to care, utilizing the nurse to do so. And I think just to bring that back, I think that a lot of people don’t necessarily understand when nurses talk about going to the full scope of their license, both our bachelor’s and then our nurse practitioners. I think that something that we should talk about is what do you feel people need to know in this area that perhaps they don’t know in we would see as sometimes restrictive processes in place that are preventing both nurses and nurse practitioners from practicing to their full scope of license? Could you talk a little bit about that? Because I think the general public, we say this all the time to nurses, to each other, we get what we’re talking about. But I don’t think the general population has any idea that there is any limitations or if there are limitations of what they are in a way that impacts them. So can you translate this to our audience so they can understand?

Trish Richardson:
Absolutely. I will do my best. It is kind of muddied, but I would say, you know, with respect to the Save Act in North Carolina and what we’re trying to push forward and have been for over eight years. So I am not an advanced practice nurse. Do have my master’s in Nursing, I don’t have that advanced practice layer if you will, but I have colleagues and I talk with them, within NCNA and within the state. So what the Save Act is, is we’re trying to say the advanced practice nurses have to have a physician sign off on the work that they do. They don’t have to be in the same practice. They don’t have to be in the same county. They could be one on the Coast. And then they have a physician who signs off and they meet with them once a year to sign off, well now virtually because of COVID, and they literally are paying these physicians, if you will, for their oversight, which really isn’t oversight, it’s a layer of bureaucracy. And what they’re saying is we want to remove that layer because we’re talking hundreds, if not thousands of dollars a month that an advanced practice nurse has to pay. So that’s all we’re trying to do is pull that away. We’re not advancing their scope. We’re just allowing them to practice to the fullest extent of their scope of licensure.

Rebecca Love:
Trish, I think that the question that the audience is, you know what? You’re nurses, why shouldn’t a physician oversee your scope of practice and sign off that you’re practicing safe and effective care? So I was a former nurse practitioner. I’m going to definitely chime in after this, but I would love to hear your opinion on this as well because I think that there is a misconception out there and there appears a logical reason that nurses have always reported to doctors and this would make how the standard of care make sure that we are able to deliver good care when it’s reviewed by a physician based colleagues. Explain why it’s not necessary for that to happen to deliver quality care?

Trish Richardson:
Right. Absolutely. And speaking on behalf of my friends that are in that area, definitely not a nurse practitioner or an APRN. But from what I understand is they have hundreds of hours of training that they go to and go through for that additional certification and scope of practice. If they want to become certified as a geriatric or trying to think of the terms that they have to go through, they have their master’s degree, yes. But then they also go through additional hours of training, both wnder supervised practice, if you will. So they have that additional training already there. And so from what I’m hearing and what I’m seeing in the report and in the news is that there they have this ability to be able to practice individually. And North Carolina is only one of a handful of states that still has that layer that says, Yeah, we still want you to pay a Physician. And when I’ve gone to the legislature, I’ve talked to some of the senators and I’ve asked, So what is it? Tell me what the barrier is, what are you hearing from your constituents? One in particular said to me about was before COVID, so two years ago. He’s like, Trish, you know, I’ve got a friend who is an anesthesiologist and he’s just really afraid. I’m like, Well, let me talk to you about that for a second. So the anesthesiologist isn’t necessarily at that head of bed in the O.R., that’s going to be a CRNA. Yes, they’re going to float. They’re going to be there, Possibly. You’re going to have a cRNA at the head of bed. So for me, what I think of this when I think about this additional layer of financial burden, if you will, it’s that you already have as nurse practitioners APRNs, you have additional training, hundreds of hours of training on top of your master’s degree of that and additional scope. In most cases, they’re using this as an opportunity for the physicians. They’re actually just getting the money associated with this supervision, but there’s no actual supervision. So I hope I said that right? Because I’m not an APRN, but just the research I’ve done and what I’ve seen in practice. That’s my understanding of this and why I’m so passionate about it. If there’s no realized value for the patients, that may not make some, but if there’s no true realized value. Why are other states like New Jersey just signed off and said, sure.

Rebecca Love:
And so I think that we can look at this from an access point problem, which I think you’re talking about. We know that for the past several decades, those that are becoming physicians are no longer going into primary care. And primary care, we know is that the front end of doing treatments and diagnosing for the general population. What we know is this dramatic shortness of access to primary care practitioners in the greater system of health care is leading patients to get sicker, worse, and more clinically acute by the time they are seen in hospital systems or by doctors. What we know is nurse practitioners who are trained in a vast array serve excellently in the space of primary care. What we’re finding is mentees actually certify, they become into specialized areas, and nurse practitioners step into that void in the primary care market or in small subspecialties where most physicians do not operate and provide access to care for larger quantities of patients. It is not that they practice independently, necessarily from health care. They just are able to have their own practice and not be burdened by financial pressures or limitations and scopes of work that are basically defined by an archaic system that would handcuff nurse practitioners to systems that necessarily don’t drive better outcomes but limit access to care. So the idea of this expanded access is to basically do exactly what you’re hoping to accomplish with increased access to care for the patients who need them most who do not have access to doctors in the first place. So it makes perfect sense to go for it and do these things. So I’m so glad you had this conversation because I don’t think that people in health care necessarily understand that when you empower nurses when you expand their scope of practice, they’re going to be able to change access for all of those people who do not have access. And there is so much need that the more that we can do that, the better we’re going to do. So tell me something because I think that when we’re talking about this world and you’re running for president of the North Carolina Nurses Association, what is a time that you have seen nurses provide a really great solution to a problem?

Trish Richardson:
Oh, goodness, there. I’m just thinking, I mean, there are so many things that I’ve seen just in my practice and over the years. Let’s go to the post-acute space and the post-acute space, we knew as a clinical education team that we as an organization wanted to see an increase in some of those higher acuity admissions. We also wanted to empower our nurse education leaders, the boots on the ground leaders out in the field, so we intentionally design new education around some of these targeted high acuity patients like infusion therapy traits and ventilator patients. And we encouraged and inspired those nurse educators to then become trainers. We designed this whole plan and we were actually able to realize true benefits in the organization. So our team came together, designed programs, offered continuing education credits as well. We did blended learning, which is something that hadn’t been done in a while in the organization, and we were able to improve those admissions and improve the standing of our organization, get those acuity partners to go, oh, well, they can take those patients better quality outcomes. But in the end, it was really Empowering the nurse leaders at the bedside, the ones the nurse educators who could then train their staff on how to take care of some of those patients. So it was taking a look and realizing we had this initiative from the Corporate Corporate Initiative and go, How can we do this? What can we do? We got huddled together, made intentional progress, designed intentional programs to then inspire the educators, train them up to train their staff, and then improve the care quality and outcomes for those patients that were starting to roll in as a result of the programs that we kicked off.

Rebecca Love:
I love this. Could you give that a little bit more of a personal perspective? Like what that meant? You know, it’s great to hear that all these patients can be better, but is there one that sort of stands out to you to make this a little bit more human to the project?

Trish Richardson:
Oh gosh, absolutely. One of the things that I did when we would do these training, we would offer to train the trainers, I would go out, our team would go out into the different regions and we would go and watch these nurse educators train. That was something that they had not been able to do before they had the education, but not this level of education, this specific around infusion patients and tricks and events. So we would go out and I would sit back and watch, and some of them would come up to me after the class. And I talked about the evaluation, how I thought they did, and some of them literally were in tears and said, I can’t believe I just gave my first class. My administrators and my directors of nursing are looking at me like you rocked it. They had their held up and their shoulders back and thought I just made a difference. I just educated my staff and our staffers say, and we’re going to be able to take better care of the patients we have now and then take better care. Later, they were empowered. They were emboldened. One of them in particular decided to go back and actually become a nurse practitioner. So she left her education role, went back into the hospital into an intensive care unit to get some of that skill base up. She was empowered to further her education. I think part of this process that we were involved in when I was at this post-acute organization is to realize the benefit of watching the education. There were 60 or 70 nurse educators watching them shine, watching them rise to the occasion and realized that, hey, they are a leader. They can improve best practices, clinical excellence at the moment. And it was just inspiring for me to watch them rise up and then inspire others to say, OK, I can really do this. It was just those moments like that being with the boots on the ground, watching them facilitate the trainings, and just sit back and let them know how proud we were of them. And literally for them to say, I’ve never felt this level of empowerment or success and felt so good about my work here than today, like in those days, we were on the boots on the ground. It was phenomenal. Yay.

Rebecca Love:
I love that. Trish, you have seen tremendous, incredible results when nurses come together and do everything that they need to do when they’re given the opportunity to really succeed. You’ve had such a profound career from financial backgrounds into nursing and then leading massive teams and driving change at institutional levels across both acute, I mean, you’ve touched almost every aspect of health care in some kind of capacity, but what have you felt that has been one of your biggest setbacks that you’ve experienced? And what is like a key learning that you’ve taken away from that?

Trish Richardson:
Oh my gosh. Yeah, when I suppose some of the notes about what we might be talking about today and I was blown away by the questions and I thought, you really got me thinking. So I would say probably one of the biggest setbacks I have had. Back when I was still in the acute space and I was going after a nurse manager role and I really wanted it. I was prepped, my friend. I mean, I had my 30/60/90 plan. I knew what I was going to do with the physician practices. I knew what I was going to do with the staff because I had been familiar with the staff for several years. I went in, I was one of the final two candidates and I didn’t get it. And it was probably the fourth time I had gone after another position in leadership in the organization. And I took it and I’m like, OK, this is OK. So my manager calls me She calls me, and she says, Trish just wanted to let you know that I don’t know Jill, let’s just say Jill, she got the position. You didn’t get it. And I said That’s OK. And my manager said, Are you? Are you Ok? I’m like, Yes, ma’am, I said Because it’s Jill’s journey. It’s not mine. It’s her time. It’s not mine. So at that moment, it actually happened to be my birthday when I got that call. So I’m like, Really? But it’s such a gift, I felt so blessed to have been A candidate. I was blessed to have the rejection because it wasn’t. It was a redirect. It was after 17 years. God knew it was time for me to scoop. So He had worked for me to do and I was open to it. And within two weeks’ time, I had this role in post-acute care, and then I thought I took the opportunity as just that. It was an opportunity to pivot and to be flexible and lean into my faith and go, God’s got me. You know, it’s like, I’m redirecting you, Trish, let’s move. So I did, and then I got to be a part of an amazing clinical education leadership team in this work at the PAC organization, and we were able to inspire 60 to 70 nurse educators in the region in those states, go out and watch them shine. And then I was able to scoot over and go to work at AllScripts and do some work there and then come back to Relias and now I’m a part of this organization that is impacting nurses and non-clinicians and leadership around the world. It’s just amazing to me that I am still humbled to this day and so thankful for the rejection and celebrating that Jill getting the job celebrated her into the leadership team that we were on and watched her shine for the short time that I was still there, that it was. I took that. No, and just it empowered me and it just to me, it helped me to understand that I’m really not in control of my destiny. I need to be open to where God is directing me, and this is today is where he wants me to be today, and I’m open to whatever he has for me tomorrow.

Rebecca Love:
I’m really glad to hear this because I think so many people end up in this place when employment and their careers, they don’t get that next promotion and they see it as a door shutting. And I think that in my life, when things haven’t worked out the way that I thought and doors shut, or it feels like it wasn’t going forward, it was simply meant to go in a different direction, just like what you said. And I think so many people needed to hear that message that when a door shuts, the window opens. And sometimes, you know, I know you reference God. I’m not a super religious person, but I do believe that sometimes things get really hard and really tough, or in certain ways that it is a way of a sign to sit there and say, you can grow, you can go on. And to your point, God or whoever that is out there saying to you, I have something different, you have to do more. We don’t want you to stay here, just go and evolve. And I think that’s such an important lesson. I really appreciate you saying that. I also think it’s very humbling because so many people do not share that they have been rejected. And it’s part of the journey and how you respond to it is so important. There was something that you said a little bit earlier. Obviously, you’re running for this position as the President and North Carolina because you have a lot of hope for the future of nursing and as you listed out, you have a lot of ambition about things that we can change. So what are you most excited about today when you are looking at nursing because we have come out of a dark year. It has been a dark of it and we’re entering into the third surge and it’s hard sometimes to maintain the hope and the positivity and the excitement. But what are you excited about coming down the pipeline?

Trish Richardson:
Oh my goodness. I, you know, in running for President-Elect for NCNA, and I think we talked a little bit about it before. It’s the opportunity to inspire others and to help nurses to gain recognition. it’s not that I want My name out there. I want nursing out there. I want the world to see. We’ve been celebrated for almost 20 years now. I guess it’s like the most respected title and I’m not anymore at the bedside. I’ve been gone from the bedside since 2016, a direct bedside. For me, it’s more about how can I champion those that are there? How can I champion the school nurses? What about the nursing pharmacist? What about the ones in post-acute who don’t usually get the respect that their acute partners get the same education you have? You’re taking care of the same people, the same diseases you’re taking care of those individuals that still need you. You still have this voice, this inner voice within you that needs to be celebrated and nurtured. You don’t have to have a title. For me, I get excited about the opportunities because nursing is on a stage where I feel like people say, well, you’re heroes, I don’t know how you do it. Well, I am a volunteer. I am a volunteer in North Carolina. I’ve gone out and I’ve been a part of the COVID vaccination clinics, and I’ve worked in volunteered in the nursing homes early on in the pandemic. And I saw what was going on in real-time. And I can tell you that some of the nurses that I’ve been associated with in my volunteering for me, I have become, I walk away from those interactions even more empowered. At the COVID vaccination clinics, what excites me is that interaction again with the patients in the community that I mean, that just inspires me literally. Having volunteered early on at the bedside in nursing homes and when we have the first vaccination clinic here in North Carolina at the PNC Arena, the very first day, it was like thirty-eight degrees, rain, nasty, but I’m literally we were, you know, we took care of a couple of thousand people in one day. I would literally run to every car, masked everything, and would shout Happy COVID vaccination day. And they’re like crying. They’re so happy. And some of them would look at me and go, You’re kind of crazy. I’m like, I know. But if you can say Happy and COVID in the same sentence, I might go for it, go for it. Because that is that community interaction that I feel like we’re reaching out to them. So it’s all about meeting them where they are, just like you do in the hospital. It’s that nontraditional setting or nursing that we’re getting out there. So what excites me is the opportunity of visibility for nurses at all levels, the opportunity to champion for nursing students to become more engaged and empowered. We look at what they were able to do to say Yes, you graduate pre-license, come on out, come on out and support, get in the community or, you know, get in the hospitals, do what you can and then go take your NCLEX. We won’t say that word anymore. But I think about the opportunities that are here, doors that are open, opportunities to get involved at the state and local level, national level, furthering the message of nurses and all that we bring. My colleagues that are still at the bedside and others, they’re all heroes, but it’s more than that. We want to come out and take care of the most vulnerable and not the underprivileged. We have just underserved them. So it’s about getting out into the community and championing for that inclusivity and to right the inequalities that are more apparent than ever. So there are a lot of things that really motivate and inspire me and to be able to speak on behalf of the nurses in North Carolina at the state level and then supporting our message at the national level. I think this time, as it’s the second year of the nurse and midwife, it’s the time that we need to continue to raise our collective voices, whether you have a title or not, if you are a nurse, you have a voice.

Rebecca Love:
Trish, it’s so great to have you on Outcomes Rocket Nursing because I think that you are such an advocate and you do such an excellent job portraying the value that nurses have to change the future of health care and all of the ways that they can quantify and have this impact. And so my question to you is now that we’re wrapping up, but tell me, how can people find you where they can they find you to get in touch with you, especially nurses and those who are working in health care in North Carolina? If you’re looking for an incredible nursing leader and voice and strategist in this space, you know, getting in touch with you, I think is going to have a ton of value because everybody that I start to hear from is, how can I find a nurse who has some of this business experience, some of this knowledge? And because it is that incredible combination that is just blowing up opportunities. So how can people find you, Trish?

Trish Richardson:
Oh my gosh, so I am on LinkedIn. I’m also on Twitter. Patricia Richardson on LinkedIn, you can find me under @nursewhowasastockbrokerfirst. And let’s see on Twitter, I think I’m @TrishyRich and then my email address is P as in Patricia and then Richardson. So prichardson@relias.com.

Rebecca Love:
Thank you so much for being here, and thank you to everyone who tuned in today to Outcomes Rocket Nursing. We are hoping to bring you some of the best and rising aspiring nursing leaders in the country, if not around the world, who are changing the face of nursing and doing extraordinary things. Trish, wishing you the best of luck in your campaign. Keep us posted on what happens and we so look forward to you all tuning in to the next episode that we have. Thank you, Trish.

Trish Richardson:
Thank you so much. It’s been a great time with you.

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Things You’ll Learn

  • It is important that those who have been on the corporate side start to be more involved with nursing associations. 
  • You need to continue to take care of your profession and to encourage this and inspire others to come alongside you.
  • Nursing is not just immediate bedside. 
  • Rejection is a redirect. It’s an opportunity to pivot. 
  • When a door shuts, the window opens.
  • Rejection is part of the journey. It’s how you respond to it that matters. 
  • You don’t have to have a title. If you are a nurse, you have a voice. 

 

Resources: 

Website: https://www.relias.com/

LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/patricia-richardson27614

#nursewhowasastockbrokerfirst

Email: prichardson@relias.com

Twitter: @trishyrich