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Steps You Can Take to Minimize Your Personal COVID Risk
Episode 648

Lon Jones, Family Medicine Physician and Author

Steps You Can Take to Minimize Your Personal COVID Risk

This is part 2 of our COVID interview series with Dr. Lon Jones. In this episode, Dr. Jones covers the history of infectious diseases. He discusses the different stages the virus works and shares historic references about hand washing. He also emphasized the importance of washing the nose and explains how treating the air either through cooling or heating is turning off an evolutionary defense which reduces our survival advantage. He also talks about the importance of well care, caring for your health even before you get sick. With COVID cases at it’s at an all-time high, we need to be taking better care of our health, and Dr. Jones explains that hand washing is not enough, we need to wash our noses too. This is a great conversation so please tune in!

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Steps You Can Take to Minimize Your Personal COVID Risk

Episode 648

About Dr. Jones

Dr. Jones is a board-certified Osteopathic family physician.  He is interested in what works and has had plenty of experience with things that don’t.

Dr. Jones, with Jerry Bozeman, his colleague and wife, developed a nasal spray made up of xylitol and saline that assists and stimulates the immune system’s efforts to clean the nose.  When used regularly, a clean nose prevents many of the medical problems that originate there.  This includes allergies and asthma, as well as ear and sinus infections.

Before studying medicine, Dr. Jones spent 6 years in college and graduate school studying history, with a special interest in the history of science and ideas.  He is confident that his background has influenced the way that he approaches health care and the practice of medicine.

Steps You Can Take to Minimize Your Personal COVID Risk with Lon Jones, Family Medicine Physician and Author transcript powered by Sonix—easily convert your audio to text with Sonix.

Steps You Can Take to Minimize Your Personal COVID Risk with Lon Jones, Family Medicine Physician and Author was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best audio automated transcription service in 2020. Our automated transcription algorithms works with many of the popular audio file formats.

Saul Marquez:
Hey, Outcomes Rocket listeners. No podcast? No problem. Launch a professional podcast you’ll love in four weeks. Most people hire production companies to edit and distribute content that sounds bad and does nothing for their revenue or their network. But you could turn the key to a made to order podcast and skip all the pitfalls that make 90 percent of shows discontinue after five episodes. We’ve got the expertise, the elbow grease, and you’re back on this one. Visit smoothpodcasting.com to learn more. That’s smoothpodcasting.com to learn more.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket, Saul Marquez here today, I have a guest that you guys all know. His name is Dr. Lon Jones. He’s a family medicine physician and author. If you haven’t listened to our previous episode with Lon, it’s called Wash More than Hands, Wash Your Nose, too. And today we’re going to be diving into covid and having a discussion around it. Things we should be considering the importance of washing your hands and your nose. The topic it’s going to carry over. But we’re going to have more of a COVID-focus today with Dr. Jones to talk about the disease, things we should consider, the history. So you’re in for a treat. Dr. Jones, thank you so much for spending some more time with us today.

Dr. Lon Jones:
You bet. My pleasure.

Saul Marquez:
So we were having a really interesting discussion before we started recording this. Give us a little context around COVID and things that we should be considering about the disease as it relates to the history of it.

Dr. Lon Jones:
It’s more than just the history of COVID, it goes back to the history of infectious disease. But to start with COVID, there are three different stages of COVID. The first stage is when you get the virus and it lives in your nose and then your throat stays there for a few days, multiplies then spreads in stage two to your lungs. And if you don’t do anything about it, then it spreads to stage three, where you’re sick enough to go into the hospital. When you go to stage three, then the CDC and the and the FDA have a treatment for it, except the treatment used to be Remdesivir. Now, the big World Health Organization study showed that Remdesivir doesn’t really do that much. So we don’t really have treatment except supporting you with a ventilator and steroids when you crash and hopefully a little bit before you want to crash anyway. That’s the only way they treat it. They totally ignore Stage One and Two. It’s very similar to the situation that Ignaz Semmelweis in 1830 with childbed fever, who is in Europe. And he looked at mothers who were dying of infectious disease, although they didn’t know anything about the infectious disease then. But Semmelweis started washing his hands before he would go help deliver a baby. Other doctors walked from the pathology lab where they were busy dissecting bodies and learning into delivering a baby. And the mothers got infected with all the bacteria from the corpses and they died.

Dr. Lon Jones:
Childbed fever killed lots and lots and lots of mothers. All Semmelweis did was wash his hands and they stopped dying. Now, this virus gets in our nose. Why don’t we wash our noses? Well, because that’s not in our model. And that’s the only reason why. Why don’t we wash our noses? And we started washing our noses 20 plus years ago when my granddaughter had ear infections. And ear infections went away with the xylitol in Xlear. if you Google or search Xlear and COVID, you will find lots of mentions and links to Dr. Gusto’s Ferrer in Southern Florida is one of the researchers looking into this issue. There are also studies done from Utah State University showing that Xlear kills the virus and unhooks the virus. It’s just an ideal way to wash your nose and washing your nose puts more water in your nose so it can work better. It optimizes the zone, up the zone that we talked about last time. You’re going to look at the last link and there is a chart from Dr. Arndale from 1986, which shows the optimal zone of humidity in the air that we breathe and how that affects our health, our nasal health. Upper respiratory conditions are minimized if we breathe the air with 40 to 60 percent humidity. That’s what’s commonly available outside, which is where we don’t get the virus now.

Dr. Lon Jones:
Outside where the normal humidity is 40 to 60 percent. Don’t go indoors where the normal humidity is 20 to 30 percent in the wintertime, and even less because our heater reduces the amount of humidity in the air that we breathe. If you wear a mask, the mask traps the water vapor that we breathe out. It increases the humidity in the air that we breathe. That humidity is important and preventing the virus because it makes our noses, it enables our noses to work better. It’s defense medicine. It’s paying attention to the evolutionary defenses that we all have that help us survive. Our current health care system is ignoring those defenses. We’re involved in a war with microbes because Pasteur showed us how microbes caused our diseases. In any war, you have an offense and a defense. We’ve concentrated on the offense. We’ve forgotten the defense. The defense is just as important, if not more so than the offense because the offense just keeps on trying to kill the virus. That’s a cosmic war because the virus is the titan of life on this earth. It’s not us. It’s the virus. They penetrate more. They outweigh us three or four to four to four or five to seven to one. Ninety percent of the cells in our body are bacteria. Stop fighting them. Find a way to negotiate with them, and that’s what xylitol does.

Saul Marquez:
Well said. And, you know, it’s fascinating. Stage one infection now is stage two infection, long stage three year in the hospital. Wash your hands, wash your nose. You know, I’ll be honest, Dr. Jones, I after our interview, I thought it was a great idea, but I haven’t done anything about it. And now that I have you on here again, I’m going to do something about it. So Xlear is with an X folks, XLEAR it’s a spray.

Dr. Lon Jones:
Let me explain that. Yeah, X is for xylitol. Xylitol is spelled xylitol. Search it and search it with COVID and you’ll find more. But Xylitol was first used medically in Finland to prevent tooth decay. And when they continued using it for tooth decay, like I think I talked about last time, they found that ear infections were reduced and the kids that were chewing it to prevent tooth decay, chewing gum with sweet tooth xylitol. And I read that study and my granddaughter was having ear infections and they said the authors of that study, Mata Johari in Finland, pointed out that it was doing something to the bacteria that caused the problem. And those bacteria lived in the nose. So we put it there. And 90 percent of your infections don’t happen. It’s not more when you keep your nose clean, you keep your baby’s nose just clean. And that’s the time when you first start having to use it. When you’re dealing with little kids with snotty noses or little kids without snotty noses who get ear infections when they go to bed to daycare. Xylitol is spelled just like it is in US in Finland, but it’s pronounced coola tall. And so we took the Finnish X sounding and made clear that’s why it spelled x l e a r.

Saul Marquez:
Well, that and so let’s talk about how often at the beginning. It’s not something that is part of our culture. We don’t wash our noses. In fact, I don’t even know. Is there a culture where that’s normal?

Dr. Lon Jones:
Oh yeah. In the Muslim world, when you do your cleaning before you go to prayer, washing your nose is part of that.

Saul Marquez:
Oh, is that right?

Dr. Lon Jones:
And they do it four times a day. We all we’re all familiar. I think if we don’t use them, we’re at least familiar with the neti pot and neti pot is an oriental method of washing your nose.

Saul Marquez:
Some people are doing it already. We just aren’t.

Dr. Lon Jones:
And we’ve talked in the Islamic world a couple of times. And the people that we talked to are incorporating clear in their nasal hygiene before prayer.

Saul Marquez:
Very cool. Well, talk to us about the cadence and what you guys would typically recommend here. How often are you doing it?

Dr. Lon Jones:
The amount of xylitol that’s in the nasal spray is minimal, but it lasts probably about six hours in your nose, so optimal is four times a day. If your humidity or you are outside or you don’t have any problems with your nose, doing it twice a day will help. Put it with your toothbrush. If you use it four times a day and put it in the morning and evening and with lunchtime and somewhere in between, we’ll get you covered. If you are positive for the virus and you’re interested in doing something about it. My recommendation is every three hours while you’re awake and just keep your nose really, really, really clean. And like I said earlier, studies show that if you do that with Xlear that you are free of the virus in seven days instead of fourteen.

Saul Marquez:
Well, know, it’s interesting. And we tend to, unfortunately, focus on health care more so from a sick care perspective here in this country. And I love our focus here today. It’s about well caring. It’s about caring for ourselves, the things that we could do routinely to help protect and minimize the effects of the virus. When we last talked several months ago, Dr. Jones, there is like fewer people that I knew with COVID. But now this thing is spreading and it’s spreading more. And knowing things like this is great to help protect ourselves for the virus. It’s certainly great information.

Dr. Lon Jones:
Well, and I hope that things like this will help to spread that knowledge because the world is still in the stage of Semmelweis. We don’t see. And I say the world and maybe I don’t know how the rest of the world functions, but I know that the US is still in the stages, what I call the Sarah Baker stage. Sarah Baker was a doctor back in the turn of the last century, like nineteen hundred. And she was one of the first women who graduated from medical school. She tried doing it on her own for a year and that didn’t work because nobody would accept a woman doctor. And so she went to work within New York City Public Health Department and her part of the city was part of Irish settlers, lived in and had a problem with both cholera and typhoid disease.

Dr. Lon Jones:
And we heard the story of Typhoid Mary, the Irish cook, that that shared her disease with so many people. It was Dr. Baker that identified her twice and finally got her put away for protective custody so she would stop sharing her disease. Then Dr. Baker started a program in the city schools of handwashing before taking care of babies and frequent hand washing to help deal with these epidemics. And in the middle of that epidemic, in the middle of her program, some 30 or 40 Brooklyn physicians wrote a letter to the mayor petitioning that her program of handwashing be stopped because it was blocking their patients. They weren’t seeing as many patients. And Sara Jo Baker in her book Fighting for Wellness, something like that.

Saul Marquez:
Okay

Dr. Lon Jones:
Anyway, in her autobiography, I can’t really remember the title of it anymore. But she says that was the highlight of her life. There’s getting that letter because it showed that her treatment worked, washing hands and we all watched hands now thanks to Dr. Baker and her work, but washing your nose is just as important. And what she found, what the bottom line of that is, is our sick health care system in the United States is based on profiting from illness. So that’s our incentive for a lot of doctors. My son says there are two kinds of doctors in the United States. There are healers and there are dealers. And since we have third party insurance that has taken patients out of the marketplace, we’re dealing with dealers all the time. And dealers are becoming the more dominant part of our health care system. So we’re not interested in healing anymore. We’re interested in profiting off of illness. And that’s where we are.

Saul Marquez:
Well said, well-said Lon. And, you know, we certainly you give us two great examples, right. Semmelweis and Baker to people who, in light of a more I want to use the word ignorant, but I guess the ignorant.

Dr. Lon Jones:
Ignorant preventive oriented approach

Saul Marquez:
Ignorance I’m just going to call it what it is. If you’re not considering the approaches mentioned, obviously washing hands now it’s commonplace and we’re all doing it, or at least I hope we are all doing that. This idea of nose washing in this environment is something that we should all be considering. And again, if you haven’t had a chance to listen to part one of our interview with Dr. Jones, Episode 604 go to the website. There’s a search bar type in Dr. Jones. You’ll see it there. It’s about handwashing and nose washing. I want her to have him back on because we got to be thinking about these things. How can we keep ourselves, our family, our employees, our patients healthy? And this is a way. So Dr. Jones, I can’t thank you enough for coming back on again and sharing your wisdom with us. What kind of closing thoughts would you like to leave for us as we part ways here?

Dr. Lon Jones:
Well, let’s go back and look at why we need to wash our noses because hand washing is pretty self-understanding because we’re always handling dirty things. And then there are bacteria that we spread by sharing on our hands. But our noses haven’t really been a problem. Going back to the previous episode, that optimal zone that we showed on our chart, an optimal zone is 40 to 60 percent. That’s what is commonly available outside like I said. And in nineteen sixty-five, a couple of things happen. Number one was half of new homes in the United States and probably around the world started having central heating and cooling. Central heating lowers their raises temperature. And in that process, it lowers the amount of available water. It lowers the available humidity in the air that we breathe and commonly in our homes in the middle of wintertime when we turn the heat on, the humidity drops down to ten to twenty percent in the air that we breathe. And that is not healthy. And that’s. We have colds and flu and everything in the cold season when we turn the heat on in the wintertime, so we need to do something about that, we need to address that problem. It’s an emergent problem. It’s not something that that commonly we see associated with those diseases. But that’s the cause because it puts us out of that optimal zone.

Saul Marquez:
You know, and a quick thought here, Dr. Jones. Like in the winter I live in Chicago, it definitely gets cold here. We turn up the heat. I mean, in the winter, I tend to get a bloody nose here. In there. Yeah. Because my nose is drier and all this stuff is really making sense to me.

Dr. Lon Jones:
And that’s why because the humidity drops when we heat the air. And in the summertime when you turn the air conditioner on, you know, look at what the air conditioner is doing, see the water that drips off of your cooling unit. That water is used to be in the air that you would breathe so that water is not there.

Dr. Lon Jones:
So you’re doing the same thing in the summertime, except we spend more time outside so we don’t have as much of a problem. But either way, treating the air to make us comfortable is not in our healthy interest. The second thing that happened in 1965 was we started making cold pills available without a prescription. Cold pills started in the nineteen forties when we found out that histamine was the reason for our children snotty noses. And so we made antihistamines and decongestants. Antihistamines stopped the runny nose, decongestants dry up your runny nose. But that runny nose is the defense. It’s trying to wash out the garbage that it senses in your nose. So that’s a wrong-headed drug that the FDA is recognizing, but they’re not willing to recognize it for what it is by what it does is blocking your immune defense and your nose. And when I asked the FDA to look at it that way, said that’s an interesting point of view. And that was the last I heard of it. But that’s what it does. It turns off a defense, turning off an evolutionary defense, turns off its survival advantage and more people die. Yeah.

Saul Marquez:
Now, some great notes here. Dr. Jones, check this stuff out. It’s called Xlear are you know, I’m definitely going to get some finally, it took me two interviews, Dr. Jones. I didn’t do it after the first one. I’m going to do it now. It’s available anywhere. It’s available at your grocery store, Target, you name it online, and a bunch of places. It’s not expensive at all. It’s the practice of washing your nose to keep yourself healthy, to minimize the impact of this virus, and to keep you healthy. Dr. Jones, really appreciate you jumping on with us again. And listeners, if you don’t know how to get hold of them, the website is CommonSenseMedicine.org. You could find Dr. Jones’s blog and all the work and his ideas. They’re certainly a great place for you to learn more about what he’s up to. Dr. Jones, just want to say thank you. Thank you again.

Dr. Lon Jones:
You bet. Check out my website, CommonSenseMedicine.org, all one word.

Saul Marquez:
Hey, Outcome Rocket listeners. Saul Marquez here, I get what a phenomenal asset a podcast could be for your business and also how frustrating it is to navigate editing and production, monetization, and achieving the ROI you’re looking for. Technical busywork shouldn’t stop you from getting your genius into the world, though. You should be able to build your brand easily with the professional podcast that gets attention, a patched-up podcast could ruin your business. Let us do the technical busy work behind the scenes while you share your genius on the mic and take the industry stage. Visit smoothpodcasting.com to learn more. That’s smooth podcasting.com to learn more.

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Things You’ll Learn:

  • The history of infectious diseases
  • Historic references of handwashing and its impact
  • The effect of heating and cooling air to our noses and survival advantage
  • The importance of nose washing

 

Resources:

https://commonsensemedicine.org/