Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lantz, President & Chief Operating Officer at caresyntax
Episode 556

Timothy Lantz, President & Chief Operating Officer at caresyntax

Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery

Today’s special guest is an experienced healthcare and technology leader. Timothy Lantz is the President and Chief Operating Officer at Caresyntax. Tim is an exceptional conversationalist, and in this podcast, he discusses how his company is enabling caregivers to save lives and mitigating potential risks through the use of technology.

He shares his insights on the safety and efficiency in surgical management, the impact of COVID on the company’s platform, the need for convergence among the different stakeholders, and collaborating in the spirit of partnership to bring patient-centered solutions to the market. There’s plenty of nuggets in this conversation so don’t miss it!

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Delivering on the Promise of Safer, Smarter Surgery with Timothy Lantz, President & Chief Operating Officer at caresyntax

Episode 556

About Timothy Lantz

Timothy Lantz is an experienced healthcare and technology executive with a background in finance and operations. He brings over 15 years of leadership experience, most recently as Senior Vice President and General Manager at Sentry Data Systems, a PE-backed, US-based healthcare technology, data and analytics firm.

Prior to Sentry, Tim served as Managing Director at Healthcare Business Insights, a healthcare research and consulting firm and subsidiary of global research and analytics company, DRG.  Tim began his healthcare career with Huron Healthcare, a multinational, publicly held consulting company, where he designed and implemented financial and operations solutions for large healthcare systems across the US. He also founded a boutique consulting firm specializing in interim executive management, turnarounds, and mid-market M&A.

Tim is a published contributor and national speaker for organizations like HFMA, HIMSS, Becker’s Hospital Review, and AHIMA. He holds a degree in finance and real estate from the University of Wisconsin – Madison.
(source: https://caresyntax.com/team-member/timothy-lantz/)

 

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Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Racket. Saul Marquez is here. And thank you for tuning in again. I have the privilege of hosting Tim Lantz today. He’s the president and Chief Operating Officer at Caresyntax. Before that, Tim was also the Senior Vice President and General Manager at Sentry Data Systems. And previous to that, managing director of Supply Chain Academy. He’s had multiple leadership roles across the health care industry. And today he’s going to be talking to us more about health technology and what they’re doing to impact global health care markets with their work at Caresyntax. So, Tim, such a pleasure to have you here with us today.

Timothy Lantz:
Thank you, Saul.. It’s great to be here. I appreciate you having me.

Saul Marquez:
Absolutely. So before we get into the work that you guys do and Caresyntax, tell me a little bit about you and what inspires your work in health care.

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah, I’m happy to. So, you know, for me, it’s been an interesting journey into health care. I think a lot of people get into health care sometimes because their parents are involved. And I was no exception to that. So my mother is a clinician. She was in health care for 30 years. And I learned from a very early age how important it was to have a well functioning, high quality, affordable health care system in any community. But I also got to see how complex it was for my mom, both as a clinician, as as administrator in health care. I watch a lot of the challenges that she faced. And so I promised myself that I would never work health care. And then when I graduated from college, I immediately started working in health care. And, you know, I think today, you know, almost 20 years later now right. what kind of keeps me excited and getting up every morning excited about what we’re doing, as I experienced firsthand during my time. I spent several years with Huron Healthcare and I worked in the front lines. So, you know, I’m not a clinician, but I work side by side with doctors and nurses and social workers and case managers to try to improve communication and coordination and clinical care. And so I’ve seen firsthand how complex it is and how difficult it is, but how critical it is to, you know, to our communities and to our societies. And in some ways, I think it’s it’s a little bit how I feel about gol, right, as you can have a kind of a tough round in golf, but you have that one magical shot that keeps coming back for more and health care is a little bit that same way, I think we tend to fixate sometimes on all the problems in health care. But then you are on the front lines and you watch how you can save a life. right. Or keep a family together or bring somebody back from the brink of death. And I think that, you know, there’s no greater thing that that I’d want to spend my time doing than than trying to increase the number of great shots that we have in our health care system.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. Yeah, it’s those those winds that keep you in the game for the long haul.

Timothy Lantz:
Exactly.

Saul Marquez:
And so you appreciate you sharing that. So mean, like, I’m not going to get in health care. You graduate. You’re in health care. There’s something about something magnetic about the purposeful kind of impact you could have in health care. And I may share that with you. And I think a lot of listeners share that with us, Tim. And so tell us about Caresyntax and what you guys are doing to add value to the health care ecosystem.

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah. So I think, you know, Caresyntax, you know, we’re very focused on surgery and on the OR, which I think in some respects, especially in the U.S., a little bit as oftentimes I don’t want to say overlooked. But when we think about population health and a lot of the trends in the last 10 years, we tend to hear a lot about chronic disease management and end of life care and these kinds of things. And we’re very focused on surgery, which, you know, if you take a step back, you know, it’s it’s not the majority of cases in our health care system, but it is certainly the majority of revenue in the health care system for most hospitals comes out of the or. And it’s also a place where from a quality standpoint, you know, a lot of quality problems can begin in the OR, you know, if those surgeries aren’t optimal. So this is where we’ve chosen to focus.

Timothy Lantz:
And, you know, in our vision as a business is to really enable caregivers to save lives specifically for us, kind of our big vision as millions of lives around the world to be saved through use of our technology by by those caregivers at the front line. So that’s really, really where we’re focused. And I think, you know, we think about adding value to the ecosystem. I like to look at it in a couple ways. But I think the thing that makes us really unique is that we’ve you know, we’ve chosen to look holistically at the health care ecosystem and within that world of the OR and try to look at stakeholder alignment. So you have kind of your clinical stakeholders, your financial stakeholders, stakeholders in operations and supply chain and then obviously the patients. So we really try to look with our technology, how we can bring those key stakeholders together, right. and drive convergence there. And then we do the same thing around the process side. So looking at kind of that end to end process of what it takes to deliver a high quality safe surgery. And so you’ve got, you know operational components, throughput, capacity, management, logistics, supplies, and then you got quality and safety, and then you have all the analytics and learning and research and development that comes on the back. And then that sort of thrust creates this continuous cycle. And that’s really where we look to add the most business value is by bringing those stakeholders together and by creating value not just in one small facet, but looking at how we can create end to end value.

Saul Marquez:
I think that’s really great Tim. So both clinical insights as well as operational and overall, just just making this high revenue area of care where outcomes are so important. Even more efficient. And so tell us a little bit about the areas you’ve been able to offer the most value and what makes you guys different than what else is out there.

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah, absolutely. So I think in our key areas we have the business had a great evolution that we started out really seeking to grow a kind of a large footprint in the operating room. We believe strongly that our founders are both come from kind of legacy healthcare families as well. So they had, I think, similar experience to me, except I think they always knew they were going to sort of be in healthcare because that’s where their family legacy was. But they believe really strongly that, you know, in order to effect change in health care, you really have to be at the front line. So the the early days of Caresyntax were about a six year old business was really spent, you know, physically being in the operating room. So we have, you know, part of our platform of products is really geared around your workflow management in the OR. Looking at, you know, how to how to capture moments in the OR, you know, from an image perspective, from a video perspective. And then we’ve evolved from there. And so looking at kind of that operating workflow right. of how you sort of manage the throughput of patients through the ecosystem and then probably most recently for us is really now evolving into that next level where we’re getting into kind of the, you know, clinical safety, coaching, training, education. So we have those three components to our platform and really how we view this is now the ability to kind of have, I guess, end to end or risk management around surgeries.

Timothy Lantz:
So that’s tend to how we talk internally. A lot is about surgical risk management from the time before a patient even comes into the OR all the way through till the patient, as you know, is through their surgery and then kind of post-operative. And I think what makes us unique and then sort of differentiated against what’s available is that end to end management of the surgical ecosystem. So to be able to take people from the very beginning, all the way through the analytics and the safety and quality and technical improvements on the back end. And it’s also that end to end platform structure that’s enabled us to be in a position where we can converge these stakeholders. So I think, you know, when I look across the industry, a lot of people are working with hospitals and then you have pockets of companies that are working with med tech companies and you have insurer tech. We’re really unique in that we actually serve all three of those markets. So you know that those are the people. You need all those guys to collaborate in order to really, I think, affect change on a massive scale. And our platform is robust enough where we’ve been able to bring those those stakeholders together.

Saul Marquez:
And that’s really great. And, you know, it’s a complex business. And there’s a lot of stakeholders, like you said, to be able to bring them all together and, you know, do some of the things that you guys are doing is impactful. So. So I’d love to learn more of some specifics, Tam, of a typical routine, whether, you know, whether it be a hip or a knee or a spine or whatever, some ENT. stuff like. Talk to us about what a typical workflow could look pre and then post caresyntax.

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah. So we could take a lot of surgical examples. But let’s take for example, you know, let’s take a total knee case or that kind of an ortho case and I’ll put it even in sort of, you know, real context with with what we’re seeing in Corona virus. So one of the things that, you know, we’re working a lot on is sort of how our technology is leverage in a virtual care environment.

Saul Marquez:
Yes.

Timothy Lantz:
So we’ll kind of do a pre and post if you think about, you know, and in a pre care syntax and even a pre COVID world right., you would have a case, you know, there’d be a medical device rep who would be in that case, and they’d be bringing in some of the tools that were needed for that case. They’d go through the surgery with the surgeon and the surgical team, the nurses, et cetera, and the techs all kind of working together. That patient leaves. Maybe they have a good outcome. Maybe they have a bad outcome. Let’s say that they have a negative outcome and they have to have a revision or they have a post-operative infection. right. How do you understand what the root cause of that was? You have today from you know, from a workflow and documentation perspective, we have the electronic medical record. But a lot of that is, you know, it’s the personal recaps of the teams when they get time to documents. right., there’s a lot of templates in the EMRs nowadays. You know, all of my kind of physician colleagues, that’s one of the things when I get together with them that they always talk about as just the amount of documentation burden and how difficult it is to sort of write everything down and do it timely and make sure that it’s accurate.

Timothy Lantz:
And so, you know, that would be sort of your pre world, right, as I have a case, maybe it turns out? Well, maybe it doesn’t. I’m not really sure necessarily if it turns out poorly, why. I can go back and try to read through the documentation. But it’s a difficult position. It’s a he said she said in a lot of cases or maybe there’s no documentation. Can you translate that into a Caresyntax world. So imagine, you know, a hospital equipped with our platform where and I’ll take it in a post COVID landscape. You know, maybe the hospital wants to limit the number of people in the operating room because they want to keep infection risk down. right. So you could have the medical device drop because their company is interoperable with our platform. Maybe they would remote into the case from a command center. So all the pre prep would be done because of the scheduling and the front end management right. the rep would know exactly where their cases were and when, they would join the case and remote in through our platform and still be able to guide the surgeon and the surgical team through that case but that case would now have in addition to the normal electronic medical record. right.. It would be fully documented in video so we could see any time in a case where there was a challenge and there is the decision that had to be made.

Timothy Lantz:
right. And you would now complete that case. And let’s say on the back end there was a negative outcome. right now you’re equipped to be able to go back in with that sure source of truth and say, let’s go review that case. right. Is there something we did, you know, mechanically in the case? Is there something that we missed something in the checklist, you know? Was there any point in time with the closure or the wound treatment post operatively where we could have done better? And it gives you the ability to really understand exactly what happened a year, mitigating potential risks up front and then be if there is a negative outcome, you can go back and really understand that every facet along that surgery, you know, what could have been done better? Do we use the right products? Was the surgical technique good? Is there anything that we could have done that would have made that outcome better? And then you can factor those improvements, you know, into future cases. Or if you’re the medical technology company, you could factor those learnings into improved products. right. So this, again, is kind of where you bring the stakeholder convergence and to the mix. And then we also and we’re doing a lot of partnerships now with, you know, with insurance companies as well, because they have and, you know, they’re vested in those top quality outcomes as well. So now you get all these stakeholders have the same interest, right., which is how do we learn and how do we guide the process to optimal outcomes?

Saul Marquez:
I think that’s really neat. And being able to have everything live and available post op is certainly an asset. Have you ever run into just the maybe like stagefright? You know, somebody says, oh, I don’t want to I don’t want to do this on video?

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah, I think that’s I think that’s a pretty common, common thing. And I think there’s a few ways that we’ve handled that. One is, you know, in the United States, we are an approved patient safety organization by the federal government. So if it’s a hospital in the US is using our system, you know, all of that kind of work that’s done to review and sort of analyze the case for quality is considered patient safety work product right.. So you can actually operate that environment in a very sort of safe, protected way. From a litigation standpoint, that’s usually kind of the number one thing that people are worried about is that sort of the litigation. But I think, you know, as we talk to surgeons, there’s actually kind of see the technology and think through how they would use it. The response has been really, really positive for us. Over the past I would say twelve to 18 months as we start to introduce this broader ecosystem into the market. And if you think about other industries, I’d like to use sports as an example or the airline industry. You know, it’s really the use of data capture and video and analytics that is enabled know in the case of aviation for it to be extremely safe. You know, if you chart aviation deaths versus surgical deaths, I think you’d be it’s staggering, right? To see how safe aviation is and how dangerous the operating room is. And so that’s I think, an easy compared to think about athletics right.. I mean, you know, you go to put together a good baseball team or a good football team. right. And you have, you know, literally hundreds of hours of video footage on every single player. And these are players at the top of their game, right? Right. But these guys are still there, going in every day to practice, you know, and Tom Brady every day is still watching film right.. He’s still looking to see what he can do better and how he can be a better quarterback or how they can run a play better. And I think we’re seeing that from, you know, from the top surgeons. As you know, they know they’re the top surgeons. But they also recognize that that they still want to see that footage. right. They still want to know how they can up their game. They still want their patients to have the best outcomes. So I think we’ve seen a real receptivity to it, maybe not 100 percent, because it’s sort of, you know, something new to introduce a little better. But I think like any other area where video is being used, we’re going to see, you know, more and more adoption as we go.

Saul Marquez:
That’s really great, Tim. And I appreciate you mentioning that because it was the elephant in the room, right? I mean. People wondering it, so I wanted to ask it. And it’s really neat. right. so the safety piece where it can’t be used for litigation, huge right.. I mean, that’s that’s a concern for a lot of physicians and providers. And. And secondly, to think of it like a pro level player washes his games or her games right.. And does it to get better. What a cool way to continue working on your craft and getting better and increasing the the quality and the outcomes that you’re getting. I mean, super, super interesting. So as you think about how you guys have improved business or outcomes. I love to hear an example from you.

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah. I’ll give you a maybe just a couple examples. So you know where our technology is currently. I mean, we’re used in thousands of operating rooms around the world right now, about, what, 200 in the U.S. across the full spectrum of what we we offer. So we definitely have, you know, just a lot of great anecdotes and great data on especially the sort of efficiency and throughput piece right. being able to use technology to, you know, to schedule more efficiently to drive the surgeries more efficiently. So there’s I mean, literally from a business standpoint, I mean, millions and millions of dollars and benefit to our clients from just that efficiency and throughput piece, you know, on the on the quality and safety side. You know, we’re it we’re in our earlier days of that journey. right. We’re still sort of with them are really our first year of of that product. But I’m pretty excited about this. I actually just learned last week that we are you know, we’re now sort of expecting our our first wave of real world studies that are linking the use of our quality and safety technology to improvements and in surgical performance.

Timothy Lantz:
And one of the kind of some of the anecdotes, I can’t get into all the details because these are peer reviewed publications, right. that are that are coming out. So but essentially the kind of the general framework of it. As you know, like we talked about that video review and we’ve had some now real world evidence that’s been going to be published showing that by recording these cases and then reviewing those cases and video right. and then using that as a training and coaching and improvement mechanism for the surgeons, there is documentation that the actual technical proficiency and the technical skill of the surgeons and specific procedures has been shown to be increased pretty significantly. So on some standard scales from three out of five and proficiency to a four or a five out of five proficiency. So you’re taking, you know, sort of an average case and making that surgeon go from sort of good to great by giving them the ability to analyze what they’re doing and be able to see that in a timely way and see it up.

Saul Marquez:
Well, I think that’s so great. And, you know, it’s certainly a different way of doing things. And if we’re going to make things better, we’ve got to do things differently. right. Maybe not all those things, but, you know. So what inspired the idea for for this? Tim, you know, it’s a very unique approach.

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah. I think, you know, we have we have great founders. I’ve I’ve been at Caresyntax a little over a year now. And one of the things that I really come to appreciate as I’ve started my journey with with this company is just the vision of of our of our two founders. And I think I mentioned as well, I mean, they come from, you know, deep healthcare backgrounds in terms of family legacy. And so their vision was to, you know, to really be able to impact lives in the operating room. And they looked at that and they said, you know, how do we do that? Well, first we have to be in the operating room. right. So so let’s start working on technology that has a physical presence there that allows us to be able to understand what’s really happening, you know, and then be able to iterate and kind of add on to the platform from there. And so I think that was really sort of the enabling vision was once we started to kind of learn as a company what was really happening in the operating room and started to understand where there were opportunities to improve safety and efficiency. You know, it became clear to us that while video is not everything or images aren’t everything. It’s a big piece because it fills in a huge chunk of missing data. right. It fills in those, you know, really creates that sort of real source of truth that you can’t get from reading notes or looking at a templated form in an electronic medical record. So I think that was probably the start of it. And then it just evolved from there.

Saul Marquez:
I think it’s great. I think it’s a unique approach. And the remoting in of sales reps is another unique approach that I imagine it’s probably become maybe a focus area during these times because, you know, access is highly restricted. Can you comment on that?

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah. No, you hit the nail on the head. So, I mean, you know, it’s something that we’ve we’ve had the capability to do in our systems of have done for a while now. But, you know, historically, it was we were using it more for consoles right.. So it was a little bit more on kind of the sort of a traditional telehealth angle right. where I’m in a case and I want to sort of bring in a consulting position. So I’m going to remote that other surgeon and maybe to get a little guidance or something like that. You know, we have we do a lot of work with the Academy for Surgical Coaching here in the U.S., where there, you know, they use our technology to help train. You know, let’s say a surgeon in a rural area where maybe they see a case that they don’t see very often. right. So they’d be able to kind of connect and with an expert surgeon, you know, in another part of the country that sees more of those cases. So that’s historically how we would use it in our platform. And then you’re exactly right. When COVID that hit and, you know, surgery started to get restricted and they started looking at infection prevention and, you know, and these types of problems as we were talking to both our partners and medtech as well as our, you know, our partners at the hospital and health system level, we realized that they were both thinking about the same thing. right., how do we how do we take care of the patients? How do we how do we think about the safety of our reps? How do we you know, how do we converge these things? And again, I go back to that convergence theme for us that we kind of sat down and said, wait a minute, we’re hearing this from both sides. Yeah, I think we’re in a we’re in a position to really do something here and create something pretty exciting. So, again, we’ve been doing it for a while, but the COVID crisis has enabled us to really think about it maybe in a slightly different context.

Saul Marquez:
That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Well, it’s a testament to the to the innovative approach that you guys kicked off the company with. And so it’ll be exciting to see how things work out, especially now that surgical volumes are are getting back up to up to par. How would you say or maybe what would you say is one of the biggest setbacks you’ve had or experienced and was a key learning that’s made you guys better?

Yeah, that’s a great question. It was actually, you know, when I was preparing to chat with you today, I actually reached out to our founders and I wanted to have a little chat with them as well, because I wanted to understand more of their journey. And I think the the one that I would want to share is, you know, as we started to evolve into the quality side of our business and really bring this concept of surgical coaching and surgical safety to the market, it was a big challenge. And we had as a company, you know, a couple of setbacks along that journey where, you know, it was hard for us to sort of figure out exactly what the right scope was for the product line and how to bring the technology together there. It was really challenging to get hospitals to adopt it. And I think to figure out to create the right incentives for them to make that level of investment into something that maybe wasn’t fully on their radar at the time. And then it required a lot of internal evolution as a business as well. right. Because when you’re going from sort of workflow and efficiency mindset into a like a real safety mindset, you know, it also is a challenge, I think, for our staff to understand that evolution of the business. Yeah, I always talk to our teams about, you know, Amazon and how Amazon started out selling books online, you know, and then they sold everything, you know.

Timothy Lantz:
And, you know, and now they have A.W. US. And I think about, you know, what was the challenge that they went through internally? right. went to their team and said, OK, guys, I know we’re an online bookseller, but now we’re going to sell you name it. There was definitely, I’m sure, some learning curve and a transition culturally there. So all of those things were at play for us as it relates to this. This coaching and safety line of our business. And I think the key learnings for us was going to sound a little bit, maybe like a broken record, but, you know, is to kind of take a step back and expand our outlook right. and really look holistically at the market. And that’s where this whole convergence theory for us came into play. And we said, you know, there are other stakeholders in this. How do we bring these stakeholder groups together so we can create the right alignment, the right spirit of partnership, the right set of incentives so that we can actually, you know, build the right solution and then bring those solutions to market. And then on the internal side, you know, really investing in our teams. right. communicating often using lots of different forms and formats to to bring our teams along, to educate, bring new people on board right. that have different experiences. And I think all of that approach and those learnings have again been confirmed by what we’ve experienced with Coronavirus this year.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. Now, that’s great. And, you know, it’s it’s neat how you guys approached it, the different frameworks around innovation. You could start doing something and then evolve to be something completely different. But then answers a need the market you’re serving and you have to keep your eyes and ears open. So it’s and it’s sometimes it’s hard to do. right Tim. He can be so honed in on what you’re producing that you don’t stop and put your head up, look around and listen to what the market actually wants. And that is the key.

Timothy Lantz:
Absolutely. And I think just they are having a spirit of partnership. I think that some partner is not easy right.. I mean, a random life right. relationships are wonderful, but relationships require work and understanding and all of these things that. So I think in business that’s that’s the same. And I think back on Miami, I have a 20 year career in health care now. And I remember very clearly I was sitting in a meeting one time with a hospital supply chain leader, and he looked at me and he said, are you working with, you know, with med, tech and pharmaceutical companies? This was, you know, at a different company when I was not yet at Caresyntax. And I said, well, you know, yeah, we you know, we’d love. To be able to work with those other other groups and he said, well, we don’t want you working with them because they’re the enemy. And it made me pause, though, because I thought about and I said, you know, you know, drug treatments are used and over 90 percent of all patient care right. medical devices and medical technology are used in 100 percent of surgical cases. So when you think about the spirit of partnership, you know, to have these stakeholders be an opposition to one another was crazy to me. right. Because the success of the patient right, the health of the patient literally depends on these different groups being able to work well and collaborate well together to produce the best outcomes. And I think there’s been this sort of adversarial undertone in our industry for a long time. And so that’s another thing I think that we have to be able to get past that we have to learn as an industry how to how to work together. It’s actually one of our core business principles that Caresyntax when together, you know, collaborating with partners, customers, vendors to achieve common goals. right. We can figure out what that common goal is, which for us is saving lives. How do we work together to achieve that common objective? And that’s it can be a very elusive thing.

Saul Marquez:
Tim, I’m glad you mentioned that, because you’re right. And many of us are either puppet laughs when said that they’re the enemy of your private life. Yeah, they are. And the reality is we have a lot of habits in health care and some of these habits may not be serving us. And Tim, you bring about, you know, not only, you know, operational practice and the work that you guys are doing, at Caresyntax, but also a good mental framework around this. We let’s let’s all win together. Challenge yourself. Let’s challenge ourselves, right. I include myself in that challenge to think about our partners differently in a way that we could partner to win together. So I think that was a that’s it’s such a great call-out, Tim. And, you know, as is as you as we get to the end of this chat today, you know, what would you want us to think about? And what’s the closing thought that you leave us with?

Timothy Lantz:
Yeah, I think, you know, for me Saul when I when I kind of look at where we are today, I think we’re you know, we’re at an inflection point in health care. We’ve been talking about it for years. But we really are. I believe that at an inflection point where we have to move beyond some of the limitations that have held us back in the past, we’ve talked about some of them today, technology partnership. But I think also, you know, especially for the U.S. health care system, I think a central driver of what we’ve done a lot as a system has been driven by, you know, what do we need to do to bill and collect on the claim? And I started my career in the health care revenue cycle, so I speak pretty firsthand to that. And I think we need to move beyond some of what we have, the habits, like you said, and learnings that we’ve developed in the past. And we have to invest in working smarter together and really improving quality at the individual case level. And I think if we can focus on doing that as an industry right. that will ultimately scale across the system. But we have to make that decision to invest in providing the best outcome for the patient because it’s the right thing to do. And I think COVID highlighted that for us again and a lot of areas right.. And then, yeah, just to kind of come full circle on our earlier conversation, I think collaboration really is the key right. is to look and say there are multiple stakeholders. How do we all work together so that we can win together? Because if we can do that collectively, providers, technology companies, insurance companies, right. ultimately the patient will win, the patient will be safer, the patient will be healthier.

Timothy Lantz:
And one of the things that inspires me at Caresyntax, how many of our employees around the world have shared with me that the reason they came to work for Caresyntax is because they or a close family member or a loved one had an experience in an operating room that costs them a life or almost cost them their life or somehow kind of impact them where their life was changed or limited forever right. because of of safety or quality issue. But then they’ve also shared with these stories around how a surgeon or a health care team saved their life. And I think that’s you know, I would love to have more and more stories of of a life saving or a life being restored and, you know, fewer and fewer stories of life being being compromised or somehow harmed right.. And so I think that would be, I guess, my closing thought as to know let’s take advantage of this opportunity we’ve been given to rethink our paradigms and to really collectively try to move health care forward with that focus on really, you know, making surgery safer and smarter for every single patient.

Saul Marquez:
What a great closing thought, Tim. And and go back to your comments about aviation, you know, and how there’s monitoring and, you know, there’s there’s tracking there. Why why aren’t we doing it in the OR? Because we shouldn’t have as many deaths as we do. So keep up the great work, folks. So Tim and the team at Caresyntax can be found at caresyntax.com. For the show notes today and all the resources and links that were mentioned just go to outcomes, rocket that health and in the search bar. Type in care syntax. Tim, would you like to share the best place for the listeners could connect with you if they want to learn more. Yes, sure.

Timothy Lantz:
So our Web site’s obviously great. My email is timothy.Lanz@Caresyntax.com. And then my office line is 2624780763 and my EA is Karen. So if anybody calls that line, it’s a good way to get a hold of me and it can help help you connect them as well.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. And folks, just to clarify, Lantz is L A N T Z So Timothy Lantz will also leave that in the show notes. So, Tim, thanks again. This has been awesome. And I appreciate you pushing our our assumptions to pushing us to question our assumptions and helping us get a better way to make surgery smarter and safer and better for all of us.

Timothy Lantz:
Saul, it’s been my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me. This has been a really enjoyable.

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Things You’ll Learn

  • There are plenty of problems in the healthcare system but when you saving lives on the frontline, there’s nothing you can do better.
  • Leverage technology to get better and increase the quality of outcomes.
  • When you are running a business, you always need to step back, expand your outlook, and look holistically at the market. Listen to what the market wants.
  • Collaborating with different teams and stakeholders will bring about greater productivity and efficiency.
  • Healthcare should learn as an industry to work together.

 

References
https://caresyntax.com/
Timothy.Lantz@caresyntax.com