Insights for Healthcare Consumerism and Digital Marketing
Episode 465

Scott Alexander, President, iVelocity Marketing

Insights for Healthcare Consumerism and Digital Marketing

Delivering innovative approaches to healthcare in the digital space

Tools We Use and Recommend

Save time, Make a Bigger Impact

Check them out

Get The Latest In Your Inbox

SUBSCRIBE

Insights for Healthcare Consumerism and Digital Marketing

Episode 465

Best Way to Contact Scott:

LinkedIn

scott@ivelocitymarketing.com

 7 0 7 – 4 8 1 – 8 0 7 2

Company Website:

iVelocity

 

Insights for Healthcare Consumerism and Digital Marketing with Scott Alexander, President, iVelocity Marketing transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Insights for Healthcare Consumerism and Digital Marketing with Scott Alexander, President, iVelocity Marketing was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2020.

Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring health care leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Rockets Saul Marquez here and today I have the privilege of hosting Scott Alexander. He’s a President and CEO at iVelocity. Now, if the name sounds familiar, that’s because I did an interview with Scott two and a half years ago. So he is here for the second time in a different role, providing some very innovative approaches to health care in the digital space, as well as being deeply and implementing strategies around health care consumerism. I know that that many of you are thinking about this today. We’re going to be diving into some really interesting ideas and ways of executing and treating patients like consumers, because that’s the way we should be doing it. Otherwise, we gonna be left behind. So a little reminder, Scott previously was the Vice President of Innovation and Product Development at Mercy in St. Lewis, where he was responsible for development, enrichment and deployment of Mercy’s non-provider businesses. Prior to that, served as vice president for sourcing, innovation and marketing in our ally. And before that, spent almost a decade within the medical devices space, again focused on uncommercial innovations. As the director and new growth platform. So he’s always been focused around what can we do differently to be better? And so today I really want to welcome him once again. Scott, so thankful that you’re able to join us again today. Welcome.

Scott Alexander:
Thanks, Saul. This is great. It’s nice to be in the two Tamra Club. And yeah, I’m so excited to be here.

Saul Marquez:
Love it, brother. Love it. So we had an opportunity to connect on and a lot of things, but I always go back to that. What inspires us most? What inspires your work in health care?

Scott Alexander:
You know, it’s a great question. I mean, so I I come from a medical family. My dad is a doctor. My mom was a nurse. I grew up around health care. And I just love the fact that if we do our jobs well, we end up benefiting people and giving them back to health and give them the kind of lives that they are looking to be able to live. So this is unlike any other industry that you can be a part of. And it just to me, it’s inspiring every day to be a part of it.

Love it. Yeah. You told the story on the first podcast then, by the way, folks, outcomesrocket.health in the search bar type in Scott Alexander. You’ll be able to listen to the first one where he goes deeper into his his story and how he started doing what he’s doing. So make sure you listen to that first one. If you haven’t listened to it. How are you and your business now Scott are adding value to the health care eco’s iVelocity.

Scott Alexander:
I think it’s a great question. And as I think about and as we all kind of think about what health care looks like today. Consumerism is by far one of the mega trends that’s affecting health care providers, affecting manufacturers of the products that we utilize in the healthcare system. And just speaking frankly, I don’t feel like we’ve kind of figured out what consumer as a means and how we actually connect with the individual patient. And so what’s the outcome of that? I mean, we talk about that in kind of high level terms, but when we think about it, what it means practically is people who are in an unhealthy state aren’t getting the kind of care and therapy that they deserve to get back to being healthy. You know, it’s one of those things where there’s all sorts of data out there about how long it takes for a breakthrough therapy to become standard of care and to become the average therapy that Steve or Sally is going to receive when they come in for a given medical condition. It’s 15 years is kind of the average and it varies a little bit. One way or the other. But that’s just too long. And if you think about that’s almost a generation that it takes for things to be to become standard of care. And in today’s day, where the pace of innovation is going faster and faster and faster, we need to be as healthcare providers. We need to be able to do a better job of getting the message out about these kinds of breakthrough therapies that can significantly benefit the patients who are in need. And so, you know, I think about what what I velocity is about. And so it’s been around the company’s been around for about 10 years. I’ve been involved for several months now, taking over and helping to kind of put some new direction on it. At the end of the day, it’s about direct patient outreach on behalf of health care providers and manufacturers who are trying to drive some of these innovative therapies into the marketplace and most importantly, to the people who need them. And so, you know, again, I spent almost a decade at moronic. I spent over four years at mercy. Both are wonderful organizations. But I just had this calling that I need I need to be able to help crack this code for the industry about how do we take something that really comes out and this is a breakthrough and speed up that pace of adoption. So that, again, the people who need the therapy are able to get it shortly after it becomes available on the market, not 15 years down the road.

Saul Marquez:
I think it’s a it’s a really great call out, Scott and as organizations think about their communication strategy either to promote a new robot procedure or quicker recovery or a population health initiative. We’re not doing it as effectively as we could be. And so I love that you decided to focus on this problem. What makes I velocity different then than what’s available today?

Scott Alexander:
Well, I think what’s available today and maybe I’ll maybe I’ll describe a part of the health care issue that I feel like. Does it well, I feel like for years is pharma has kind of figured this out. So they’ve figured out that, hey, if we go directly to Scott as a patient, I’m going to raise my hand and say, tell me about the drug, extra drug. Why, whatever the case and we see this advertising all the time. And yeah, sometimes you don’t actually for it. But.

Saul Marquez:
All the side effects. Mean now there’s the gone on the side effects.

Scott Alexander:
That you just play that is like the music in the background, like sing a song on the side effects. But I think that’s what the farmers did really well is they figured out how do you educate and sort of raise awareness to it. And that’s the thing. That’s that medical device manufacturers that produce a smaller company, a smaller startups, digital health and providers just haven’t really latched on to. It’s prohibitively expensive, at least historically, in terms of how direct, you know, direct patient outreach works. And you’re doing you’ve got to do Super Bowl ads and that sort of thing. We spent a lot of time in the digital space and we find that it can be incredibly cost effective in terms of raising awareness of the kinds of therapies that are available to people today and then ultimately getting them to raise their hand and say, hey, I’m interested in learning more about whatever whatever sort of breakthrough orthopedic procedure you have or whatever, how we treat sleep apnoea or how we address Barret’s esophagus, those types of things that are, you know, things that we are doing. So that’s that’s what I think is maybe different today than in the past, is by using digital platforms, we’re actually able to reach out to people on an individual basis and educate them on a one to one basis, as opposed to having a hit like a big Super Bowl commercial, which then makes it available for people, you know, for health care providers, whether it’s a hospital or a individual provider or a manufacturer of some type, to be able to put these kinds of campaigns on that Pfizer and Merck and others have been able to do for decades.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I think it’s a it’s an interesting idea, Scott. And how would you say what you do has improved outcomes or made business better for the customers and clients that you serve?

Scott Alexander:
Yeah, absolutely. So I’ll maybe dive into one of the areas that we’re seeing a lot of focus today. So we do a lot of work around sleep apnea. It’s a tremendous problem. You can pick your statistic and I’ve seen numbers as high as 40 percent of Americans have sleep apnea. And even if that number is twice as much as what reality is, that’s still a tremendous number of people who have sleep apnea. And I think we all are either aware or becoming aware of the terrible downstream impacts of poor sleep, right. Everything from heart disease to stroke. And they think dementia may be tied to that. There’s all sorts of terrible things that come from not getting a good night’s sleep. Unfortunately, most of us don’t know that there are options out there outside of this. You know, the C-PAP where you put this big hose like an elephant, slap this thing on your face like Darth Vader. It sort of pushes air in your lungs to keep you breathing. There’s actually been a lot of signaling explosion around what dentists are doing in this space. And so we work with a number of dentists. And in fact, we have a strategic partnership with the manufacturer of all appliances to raise awareness for these other less invasive, easier to use therapies so that people can get the care that they need. And so we work with the manufacturer in terms of helping raise awareness around their products in the marketplace. But we also work with the individual practices is your primary dental practice who are trying to treat patients in their respective geographies. And so on behalf of that, we’re running again where we’re getting online or running advertising campaigns for Dr. Smith practice and just educating the population around the dangers of sleep apnea, the opportunities for treating it. It doesn’t have to be this big elephant face thing that you’ve got to do and just sort of easing people in the fact that, hey, here’s a new therapy that’s really only been out for a couple of years, but people are seeing the benefit of it. And as a result, we’re seeing these dental practices see substantial growth. We’re seeing this, you know, our strategic partner seeing substantial growth. And most importantly, we’re seeing patients getting care that’s giving them a good night’s sleep and reducing the risk of some of those downstream effects that sleep apnea can cost.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, it’s really interesting, Scott. So it’s basically a market development play that’s targeted and the provider in this case, in this example, the dentist. And then also the actual market that’s going to be using it.

Scott Alexander:
That’s right. Yep. Yeah. Yeah. This is exactly, I think sort of one on one digital marketing that we’re doing on behalf of the providers and then the manufacturers as well.

Saul Marquez:
Fascinating. It’s an interesting play. And what would you say has been some of the results that people are raving about?

Scott Alexander:
Yeah. We’ve been incredibly excited about the results. So what we’re what we’ve been doing to kind of focus in on sleep apnea. But what we’ve been doing is just, again, partnering up. And we’re we’re bringing dozens of new patients into these folks practices that would have never come in through the marketing efforts that we’re doing. Right. So to dive a little bit deeper in it with the tools that we’re using are tools that are available to really anybody. Listen to a podcast releveraging platforms like Google. Well, everything. Platforms like social media, marketing on Instagram and Facebook and others or Linkedin that sort of thing. We’re doing e-mail campaigns. We’re building Web sites. So what I would say is I don’t know that there’s necessarily some rocket science in terms of the platforms that we’re using, but the way we’re putting them together and the kinds of results we’re getting for our partners is pretty exceptional, because once you start to talk to people and you understand how you begin a dialogue with somebody, an individual, I’m going to talk to you, Saul, about, you know, the fact that you’re snoring at night. And I’m able to do that not just in a one time conversation that we’re going to have in passing, but I’m able to do that over days, weeks, months and even potentially years through these platforms. What you end up doing is you build a really educated audience that understands the therapies that are available to them and they can make informed decisions about, you know, when. How do I come in to get the care that I need? You know, I feel like if we’re to look at what your typical primary care visit. So we both have a family doctor, primary care doctor, we go and we see maybe once a year. Right. And you get seven minutes to have a patient. Right. And that’s really what it is. And so, Dr. Smith, my primary care physician, doesn’t have time to run through everything that’s going on with me as a 4 year old guy who’s relatively healthy. We’re probably not talking about sleep out there. We’re probably not talking about things outside of, you know, what’s my blood pressure looks like and how my lipids. And that’s not the bash primary care physicians. Just but that’s the reality is that we live in, is that we’re so busy in the health care system that we don’t have the time to educate these platforms that we’re using, the programs that we’ve built around the therapies that we’re helping to drive in the marketplace. Give us the time and the ability to educate Sol Marquez on the dangers of snoring and the fact that, hey, this is this is not a good thing and you need to do something about it. And here’s how you do it. And it just gives us the time to be able to get people into the way that we’ve never been able to unpassed.

Saul Marquez:
Sure. Yeah. Scott And you know, that’s a really great point, right? I mean, you go see your primary care doctor once a year. If you’re a woman, maybe a couple, you know, you see your primary and then you’re your Gyne. But beyond that likeed46rtf7gyhujil.’ there’s there’s really no opportunity for further engagement. And where does that engagement happen? And if you have a device or a technology that you could be educating people on or a procedure, you know, where are you doing that and how are you taking advantage of the potential scenarios? And Scott and his team are actually making us understand those areas that we’re missing out on. And you know, you’re missing out. You’re missing out. And so the opportunity to engage is pretty high.

Scott Alexander:
I remember back when I was at Medtronic running commercial innovation, you know, we would come up with these these new kinds of technologies and we’re thinking, man, this is going to be incredible. And all we need is for primary care docs to refer the patients or indicators for this into a bear after surgery, for example. Yeah. And then we go and we talk to primary care. Doctor, we realize, Scott, you’re out of your mind like these guys. My dad was a primary was in primary care for a number of years and he was run ragged with these seven minute visits. You know, you get them to have these quick partitions. And so if I’m putting myself back in the shoes of Scott, I was entered back at Medtronic or, you know, someone else who may be listening, that is on the marketing side of a medical device or a medical service. You can’t rely on the primary care physicians to be your referral source because they just don’t have time for it. And again, it’s not I’m not bashing on primary care docs. I think they do an amazing job, but they don’t have time to think about every possible thing that can be beneficial to you know Saul Marquez, as the patient or Scott Alexander the patient. And so as a manufacturer, you need to think about how do you how do you do market development in a way that doesn’t make you doesn’t tie you to a conversation that a primary care doc or even a specialist is got it to have with a patient? How do you get directly to the patient to be able to have a conversation about. There’s esophagus or decreasing needs that you get in your 40s or you have sleep apnea or any of these sorts of particularly chronic conditions that worsen over time, and people just kind of live with and unless it sort of brought up and put in their face, they’re not going to do something about it until, you know, until it’s really sort of significant. Yeah, I just kind of on a roll about we were at Medtronic. One of the things that always amazed me because we were, you know, back in that role just for folks who didn’t hear the first podcast. Again, pure gold. Saul Marquez best podcaster out there.

Saul Marquez:
Thank you.

Scott Alexander:
Yeah, I was always amazed at how high the prevalence were. For a lot of these diseases and again, whether it’s high blood pressure, you name it, I can never figure out what that was. And the reality is, it’s just it’s the new normal for people. This is what they live with. And so they don’t think, hey, into your soul. This if you’re a manufacturer of a of an innovative medical technology, part of it you’ve got to do is got to figure out how do you to jolt people in awareness that, hey, I don’t have to live with high blood pressure, not to live with being exhausted from using sleep apnea because they’re there. But I don’t deliver these kinds of things so I could do something about it as a manufacturer. You will see dramatic growth if you’re able to engage the population in coming forward asking for your therapy rather than waiting for the healthcare system broadly to be reactive and then only bring these things up once somebody has a really significant issue.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. Now it’s a really great call out and a great opportunity for folks to explore whether a drug, a medical device, a medical service, something to think about that market development, engagement. So see, you’ve done a lot in your career. Scott, you’ve worked with this industry, you’ve worked with providers, and now you’re running your own shop. What would you say is one of the most proud aspects of your career thus far?

Scott Alexander:
You know, I would say taking over I’ve lost is probably. I’ve been a part with great teams. And, you know, when it’s back in Medtronic as at mercy and we’ve done some couple of things. But I’d always wanted to run my own company and basically do something that’s going to benefit society and build a healthy business that’s going to get it going to basically employ people and just run their own shop. And taking that leap was difficult. I mean, I just turned 40. I have four small kids. Yeah, thank you very much. So it was it was a difficult decision to be able to go from, you know, for mercy, which I love the culture and love with what nurses about. But to jump out and kind of do my own thing. It was difficult. And I think a lot of people want to do it and then don’t. I feel like making that decision and actually following through is probably a thing that I’m most proud of.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I’m sure it’s very fulfilling. Scott And you also have your days when you’re like, why did I do this? But yeah, you took the lead.

Scott Alexander:
And sometimes day.

Saul Marquez:
And sometimes maybe in the same hour.

Scott Alexander:
Exactly. This is great. What the heck?

Saul Marquez:
But now I admire you for following your dreams and and doing what you what you believe is is what you were brought on this earth to do. What would you say is your most proud business accomplishment?

Scott Alexander:
Yeah. If if we’re just gonna kind of focus in the past year or so, again, I’ve been really fortunately blessed to be a part of some great teams and so doing work at mercy and the telemedicine space was fantastic. Right. being a part of Medtronic and helping to develop and deploy medical devices that are used in surgery today that are pretty great if I think about some of the past year. We do so just can kind of focus on sleep that just as we’ve been talking about that and it’s front and center. So one of the things that we do is we put together seminars on behalf of practices that are trying to escape what people on the dangers of sleep apnea, the kinds of options are out there. And we did one here in Denver. And I went to and this was early, early on in terms of us figuring out how we’re gonna how we’re gonna do this. I’m going to educate people on sleep apnea. And I sat in the back of the room and about 20 minutes into this conversation, the presentation from a from a doctor to these patients, they started the patients themselves, prospective patients themselves started telling stories to each other about their experiences and how this could be really Life-Changing for them and and educating each other on why this is a good thing for each of them to pursue and how this may really positively impact their lives. And yeah, it was a great moment for me because at the end of the day, I’m all about helping people and see that sort of organic collaboration among among people who are literally strangers 20 minutes prior. But helping each other through learning about the dangers of sleep apnea and options that are out there and having discussions about whether or not they should move forward with getting the C.T. scans and the other kinds of things that you need to do to get treated for sleep apnea. It does make me proud because I had a team that worked hard and put this together. And it was you know, we were first doing this. We were we didn’t have a whole lot of data about what we do, but knowing exactly that this was going to be successful. So to to sit in the back of that room and see it, just see the engagement from the people who are going to get benefit from the therapy was just just for my heart.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I think that’s really great, Scott. And going from not knowing each other 20 minutes and sharing and I mean, having a common ailment is definitely a rapport builder. And, you know, if there’s a way for for them to help each other, I think you guys created a great environment for that. So kudos to you and your team for being able to build that environment. I guess being able to scale it is the question, right? I mean, do you guys go by with webinars within or what what is the next steps look like for that?

Scott Alexander:
Yes. So maybe kind of describe what we can do. So we basically live online and then sort of in a seminar format. So when we’re working with a manufacturer or a provider that’s we’re doing what we’re doing is we’re building campaigns to find people just have three types of patients that are a manufacturer or particularly provider has that they can engage in some of these innovative therapies. So number one, is your current or previous patients. These are people that, you know, and there are certain platforms like email campaigns work really well to get people educated about how you should learn more about the dangers of ignoring gout and that sort of thing. Right. That’s one. Number two is you have people who are active seekers. So active seekers are people that know that they have a problem and they’re looking for a solution. And so a lot of times, again, these can be people who already have a treatment that is working, but they only like it or they at least have been diagnosed and they want to figure out what their options are. And we all know there are people going to Google to find the answers to that. And so whether that’s like high blood pressure, you name it, Right., these are that’s where people are going to figure out what are my options. And then you have kind of engaged all afflicted the people that have a given condition. This is that prevalent population that’s not seeking care. That’s used to frustrate me as a medical device market or back a number of years ago is how to get to them and how it spread that conversation. And again, things like social media, a great platform to start those kinds of conversations. But what you do from that really depends on the type of condition that you’re treating and the therapy that you have. So something like old appliances for sleep apnea. People generally like to see it, touch it, feel it. Right. We find that they need to come into an office or they need to come into some of these seminars that we can do. We can do them online as well. But there’s kind of magic about being in the same thing. There are people in Yahoo, right? Yeah. So there’s that. But there’s really no end to how you scale these things so that, you know, once you get it up and prove that, hey, this works for a test market, then you know, these platforms work across the world, at least at the very least across the U.S. and North America. But, you know, they work across the world. And so once you kind of figure out what it takes to get these people engaged, these people who need your help, it really just becomes a matter of scaling it. And there’s really not a a top end to that.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Now, it’s a very interesting method. And you know, something for everybody to be thinking about. Well, what’s one of the biggest setbacks you’ve had, Scott and what is your learning?

Scott Alexander:
Yeah, good. Good question. It’s been going from a big company. Forty thousand plus employees, co-workers to 20 is a major shift. And also coming into a business that’s been around for a number of years, that’s been doing good stuff. But you knew that you wanted to kind of change the culture. It’s it takes time and it takes longer than you think it would. And so there’s been sleepless nights and frustrations about how do I help people see the vision of what we’re doing and why we’re doing it both internally with employees and then externally with some of the partners that we have. Yeah. But every I mean, the reality is every setback. It was the quote, experiences get wizards, what you get when you don’t get what you wanted. And I’ve got a lot of a lot of wisdom. So you’d have to work hard. And I would say that the biggest setback has been just the time that it takes to help to be able to sort of share your vision, get people get it right, nodding up and down that, yes, we understand what we’re doing and why we’re doing it and how it’s going to help, ultimately help the patients.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. It’s a great chair. The internal sort of culture setting and then the the external getting people to buy into to what you guys are doing.

Scott Alexander:
That’s right. Because what we’re doing is different than what traditional market development has been. And Right., it takes it takes some innovators to partner up with us to say, yeah, you know, we haven’t done this before, but we’re willing to give it a try. We want a. Highlight it and kind of see the results are be successful as we think they’re going to be. And that’s that’s a challenge. But, you know, frankly, it’s it’s part of being on the innovative side of health care as you you’ve got to go in places that people haven’t been before. And, you know, luckily, we’ve got some good case studies that that make us feel confident about the fact that we’re going on the right path. And so, yes, it’s a matter. Sure. That over time, the right people are going to reach out and we’re going to have conversations and work and work together. And then it becomes over time, it becomes that standard of care. Takes it doesn’t take 50 years like it did for beta blockers or that’s working. But, you know, it’s going to take some time. But we’re at home now.

Saul Marquez:
I think it’s a great attitude, Scott. And for the listeners thinking, what is this? And this is different. Yeah, it is. And three years ago, I’ll share when I started the podcast, it was different. Right. There was probably like four health care podcasts. I was the fourth one. And now I can’t even count them on my hands and feet because people realize the benefit of marketing through podcasts and the power of the network effect. And what Scott and his team are doing today is outside of the box. Guess what? It’s not outside of the box for retailers, they’re already doing it, but it’s outside of the box for health care. So if you’re going to pooh pooh the idea, then you know it’s up to you. But when your competitor does it and you get left behind, then you’re going to think, wow, I should have done something about it. So I call that action for listeners. Think outside the box today, not when it’s too late.

Scott Alexander:
Yeah, I think you bring up a good point, too, that you were podcasting before. I remember when you were little just starting it. And if you look at where you are today, you have a huge number of listeners. You’ve got tremendous influence in the industry. And a lot of that just comes from the fact that when you do a great job and two, you’re one of the first people in it. So you get this great snowball effect. And I think that’s the thing that we’re seeing is, yeah, what we’re doing is different. And it’s not that different if you’re in retail or you’re in other industries that have always had to go to the consumer. But I think the health care providers and the manufacturers that understand the real impact of consumerism and can get on the front end of the wave are going to find themselves two, three, five years down the road. Then we saw more cars of their industry. Right., super handsome, very effective.

Saul Marquez:
You do, funny man. Did you give me tight credit? I’ll take it. I rest. I receive it.

Scott Alexander:
All kidding aside, I do think that consumerism is one of the things that this is stuff that was kind of work to do. And at Mercy is, you know, as V.P. of innovation in private. And I think about it. Well, how do you get to all these folks? And I’d like to think maybe this is a little maybe too egotistical. And I told us for that in advance. But I kind of feel like what we did was we’re able to sort of crack the code and figure out how do you make commercialism accessible to the average provider through the platforms that we’re using and the people who are gonna take advantage that in the near-term term are the ones we’re going to really see their practices grow substantially. And the people that are going on the tail end of the folks that are going to be scratching their heads saying, hey, well, how do I see this coming? That sort of. And that’s what’s fun. That’s what’s fun to be on that front end of innovation for healthcare.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. Yeah. And, you know, I would say to the people listening. Check out Scott’s Web site. Research the topic further will have links to his Web site and and the work that he does in the show notes. But you don’t have to go all in right away if you tip your toe in the water. That’s okay, too. The consistency is what matters. But the important thing, just like investing. You’ve got to start now because it also does have a compound effect.

Scott Alexander:
It does? Yeah. Yeah. People can go to the Web site, ivelocitymarketing.com and see a lot about what we do.

Saul Marquez:
It’s the letter iVelocity.

Scott Alexander:
Yes, right.

Saul Marquez:
ivelocity.com.

Scott Alexander:
ivelocitymarketing.com.

Saul Marquez:
ivelocitymarketing.com.

Scott Alexander:
That’s right. The other thing that they can do is just reach out directly to me. So my email is pretty easy. It’s scott@ivelocitymarketing.com and just shoot an email. I’m happy to find some time to connect. Give me a call. Right. So myself. Is it okay if I get myself?

Saul Marquez:
Absolutely. Yeah text Scott or you could text them or call them if you have a question. Not while you’re driving them. I know you don’t want to get blamed for trashing.

Scott Alexander:
A safety hazard. So yeah. So my my number is 7 0 7 4 8 1 8 0 7 2. 7 0 7 0 7 4 8 1 8 0 7 1. Text and call. What we find is that a lot of times when we’re talking to providers, we’re talking to two manufacturers and strategic partners. A lot of times it’s tough questions like how would you like what are you doing for other people and how does consumerism work? And like, what are the three simple things you could do to. Not whether or not this would work for our product or the services that we’re trying to provide. And I think we’ve talked about the fact before that I missed my calling as a high school science teacher. I just love teaching and sort of sharing what what I know. So if I may out there listening is interested to learn more about how we’re doing consumerism and how we feel like we’ve been able to crack the code. I’m just happy to share that knowledge freely.

Saul Marquez:
Love it, Scott. A couple more questions and we’ll wrap up. I do want to know if you could have lunch with anybody, who would it be?

Scott Alexander:
I had two answers for you. So one with be with my parents. You know, I live in Denver. I’m a pastor back in South Carolina. They would stop visiting recently. We’re going to head back. You know, we get back pretty regularly, but that is like spending time with them. And my my family says I can pass this up. So I’d say that. But if I had to pick somebody professionally, I would take a toll go on day and Right. Checklist manifesto and a great author, great physician, obviously has a very important role in the American health care system with his new role. I just like the way that he thinks. I think the way he I like the way he thinks based on how he’s written. And I just let to get not just think this seems like a really fascinating guy.

Saul Marquez:
So what’s your number one health habit?

Scott Alexander:
Yeah. Great questions. I feel like you have to dial the three things you need to have. Good health is you to eat well. You have to move and then you have sleep. And under the exercise thing and I have four small kids, I’m chasing them around. That’s a lot. But I also try to do is more structured checks left size. But the biggest thing is my wife and I a long time ago decided that we’re gonna go. We live in Colorado, so it’s okay to be like very happy. And so we went like really super organic Right. graphic. Your and I like. Yeah. Good stuff. I mean, she’s got a great point. And she said, basically, I agree with her. You’re gonna pay for health, you know, one way or the other. You’re going to pay for the expensive food and the upfront soda or you’re gonna pay for the cost on the back end. And a whole lot more fun to eat grass-fed cheeseburgers than to have to go to the doctor. So. So we eat really, really clean.

Saul Marquez:
I love it, brother. It’s a great outfit. And what would you say is the best advice you ever received?

Scott Alexander:
I’m going to butcher the quote, but basically you’re going to regret more the things that you don’t do in life and the things you do wrong. And so don’t fear. Don’t let anxiety keep you from doing the things that you’re really you’re called to in your heart at the end of the day. We only get so many turns around the sun and you need to make them count. And so don’t live somebody else’s life. This is the life that you feel like you’re being called to live and. Right. It’ll it’ll work out in the end. And I do my best to do that. I mean, I’ve always kind of been on the cutting edge of stuff and doing some some really amazing. Been able to be a part of some great teams by not trying to live someone else’s life. And sort of this latest chapter is an example that even, you know, a wonderful organization and mercy to go and move my. So I don’t know for top of this, but in the course of a year, we moved my family from St. Louis to Denver. We had a fourth child. I bought a business. I don’t know what else we could’ve done to kind of detain boy. Yeah, but that’s kind of busy work being called to do it. It’s busy. It’s been a did. Better than board. But I feel like that I would share that if I saw those people as you don’t let time pass you by and not take a shot on goal because you’re afraid because you know, once you take that shot and go even as you mentioned, I realize, hey, I can get the ball again, I can take another shot. So I think that’s the best advice I’ve ever gotten.

Saul Marquez:
Love it brother. Great advice. Man, this has been it’s been great reconnecting with you here and your new venture. Again, folks go to Outcomes Rocket.health type in Scott Alexander in the search bar. You’ll find links to his Web site. His phone number if you want to text him. But just to recap there. Scott, you want to just give us a closing thought and the best place for the listeners can reach out.

Scott Alexander:
Sure. Yeah. It gets kind of closing thought. I think this is a really exciting place in health care right now. We were seeing a bunch of megatrends that are fundamentally changing the way that health care is delivered. And I would just invite everybody listening to trying to be on the front end of that so that we can make this health care system into what we want it to be. Right. each of us has has a role in that. And so, you know, lean in and make it make it yours. And then you have people can get can reach out to me. So iVelocitymarking.com to so there. The word velocity marketing.com or shoot me an email at Scott@ivelocitymarketing.com or give me a call at area code 7 0 7 4 8 1 8 0 7 2 or shoot me a text. And yeah, we can connect. I’d love to. I’d love to hear about what other people are doing and and just get connected with other Outcomes Rocket listeners and just doing just great things for the health care system.

Saul Marquez:
Love it, Scott. Hey, thanks for visiting with us again and not wishing you the best here in the upcoming days.

Scott Alexander:
Awesome. Thanks Saul appreciate it. Great talking you.

Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast. Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.com for the show notes, resources, inspiration and so much more.

Quickly and accurately convert audio to text with Sonix.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Thousands of researchers and podcasters use Sonix to automatically transcribe their audio files (*.mp3). Easily convert your mp3 file to text or docx to make your media content more accessible to listeners.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2020—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your mp3 to text, try Sonix today.