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Observing Social Determinants of Health to Improve Population Care
Episode 384

Andrew Renda, Associate Vice President, Population Health at Humana

Observing Social Determinants of Health to Improve Population Care

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Observing Social Determinants of Health to Improve Population Care

Episode 384

Recommended Books:

Count of Monte Cristo

Blue Zones

Best Way to Contact Andrew:

renda1@humana.com

LinkedIn

Mentioned Links:

Company Website

Bold Goal

Observing Social Determinants of Health to Improve Population Care with Andrew Renda, Associate Vice President, Population Health at Humana | Convert audio-to-text with Sonix

Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes, and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the podcast. Today I have the privilege of hosting Dr. Andrew Renda. Dr. Renda serves as member of Advisory Board of the Diabetes Life Coach LLC. He is Humana’s Director of Bold Goal Measurement. His work includes leading Strategy Analytics, metrics, and research related to the measurement progress toward Humana’s Bold Goal of improving community health by 20% by 2020. Doesn’t get any clearer than that. And Dr. Renda has a BS in Psychology and Biology from the University of Kentucky where he was a National Science Foundation undergraduate fellow. He received his medical degree and a diploma in Clinical Psychiatry from the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Followed by a Master’s in Public Health from Harvard University. He’s explored the realm of Community Health, Population Health, even as a frontline physician. And it’s a privilege to have him here on the podcast today to speak about what he believes is the way forward to 20% by 2020 and also how to improve community health so without ado I want to open up the mike to Andrew, welcome.

Andrew Renda:
Thank you Saul, I appreciate you having me.

Saul Marquez:
It’s a true pleasure Andrew. Now tell me what is it that got you into the medical sector?

Andrew Renda:
Yeah that’s a great question. You know I’ve always been interested in helping people but the big question I’ve had throughout my life is how do I best do that. And when I started in undergrad I majored in psychology and biology I knew I wanted to go into the health field in some way. I did some basic science research looking at the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal stress axis using rat models. So kind of from starting from the macro micro perspective. And then I went to medical school and wanted to focus in psychiatry and go down that path and it wasn’t really till residency that I realized that I wanted to go even more macro and and I felt like I could do the most good by going into population health or public health and in particular because I’ve always been interested in mental health really interested in reducing the stigma of mental illness and populations so that got me just go back to school and get a master’s in public health and then kind of take my career from there.

Saul Marquez:
That’s a fascinating journey there Andrew and talk about a timely journey for where we’re at today right. The mental health is front and center. How do we improve population health front and center so definite forward thinking in your interests there. What would you say is a hot topic that needs to be on health leaders agenda today and how are you and the folks at Humana approaching it?

Andrew Renda:
Yeah well I’ll give you two and then we can figure out which one we want to talk about first. But the first one to me and actually both of these are things that I was not trained for in medical school or even in residency. The first one is really advanced analytics. It’s using new data sources things like predictive models, machine learning, artificial intelligence, leveraging those capabilities to better serve populations to help people be healthier. So I think I think that’s one where I feel like I was not trained to do and when I went through my medical training. The other one is really you know a passion of mine now and that’s social determinants of health. I feel like we’ve gone through this evolution in medicine where we dealt with acute care. So someone comes into the hospital what do we do for them there when they’re in the hospital and prevent them from coming back. And then we sort of went back upstream a little bit and said “okay well we need to do things like disease management or we need to help stabilize people with chronic conditions and things like that before they end up in the hospital.” And now I feel like we’re at this inflection point where we’re recognizing that we need to go even further upstream and deal with those social economic environmental things that are really profound influences on health. And so that’s an area again where I was not trained to do in medical school but it’s something that as I’ve gotten into the population health field I recognize that that’s an area that needs a lot of attention, a lot of research, a lot of test and learn interventions, and that’s really what our organization is doing now.

Saul Marquez:
And that’s fascinating and great that you called out two key areas the advanced analytics and social determinants. Tons of people pouring in resources and in time to affect these areas and when you think about the chronic diseases the chronic conditions and you know the thought that hey you know 5% of the people drive majority of the cost addressing those is key to right as as the population health approaches that we take focus on that more. What what would you say is an example Andrew of what Humana has done today to create results by doing things differently to impact these two areas?

Andrew Renda:
Yes another great question. So our CEO about four years ago declared a Bold Goal for our organization and that was to improve the health of the communities we serve by 20%. And then he looked at my team and kind of said “okay well, figure out what 20% healthier means. Figure out a metric and then put a strategy behind it to address it” and so we went down this path of saying “well health is really health related quality of life.” And we evaluated a number of different metrics for that and we settled on the CDC Healthy Days tool. And we really like that a lot because it’s kind of a short and concise measurement tool but it gives equal weight to physical and mental health which as I just said is kind of my background. So…

Saul Marquez:
Yeah.

Andrew Renda:
I believe it’s really important to keep mental health you know front and center and so we’ve used this healthy days tool to evaluate population health in our membership in the communities that we serve. And we’ve done that for you know about three years now. And you know what we’ve recognized is that in order to improve health related quality of life to improve healthy days we need to certainly address chronic conditions and stabilize disease and things like that. But we also need to go upstream and address those social instruments of health. And that’s really what my team is all about is going after those social determinants. And so we’ve developed you know pretty robust intervention on pipelines around things like food insecurity and loneliness and isolation and that’s been really gratifying to see the results from that. We’ve gone from just generating some insights and some research to some test and learn interventions and now we have a randomized controlled trial going in south Florida right now to address food insecurity high touch intervention and nine different clinics where we’re screening for food and security and those that are positive are getting a high touch intervention that involve. Certainly referral to food banks but also nutritional education how to shop and eat healthy on a budget, case management, help enrolling and things like SNAP and weight benefit. And we’re having mobile food distributions and so where we’re as I said treating it like a randomized controlled trial and we’ll be evaluating outcomes on those patients looking at improvements in health related quality of life which we measure through healthy days but also clinical outcomes. So are we addressing clinical gaps in care, medication adherence, and preventive screenings, and things like that. And then the third category is healthcare resource utilization and cost. So ultimately we want to bring social determinants into the forefront and understand what that business cases and the ROI. Because that’s if that’s the way that we make this kind of work sustainable.

Saul Marquez:
That’s so interesting and man I can’t imagine it was easy to come up with with a measuring stick. You know and and so you landed on the Healthy Days tool. How did you guys land there? That’s really interesting.

Andrew Renda:
Yeah. It’s an interesting exercise. So we first had literature reviews. We did a surveillance really of of a number of different health related quality of life measures. There’s the S.F. 36, there’s the PQH 5 that’s used in Europe a lot and they varied a lot and the grounds they covered in terms of you know subjects and they varied a lot of the number of questions that they had. So the way we narrowed down the one that we chose is that one we wanted to be short and concise so that it was easy to administer you know something you know as a 36 with 36 questions is fantastic for research purposes on small population but we’ve got millions of members. And so we needed to be able to serve a quickly large population and so it needs to be short and concise. But as I said when we think about health and population health we believe that physical health and mental health should be treated on an equal playing field. So that’s what really drove us to healthy days is that in two questions you can get at how a person actually feels about their physical and their mental health and that’s the other part of this tools that you know it’s self report by design and we feel that’s really important. We feel like you know an individual knows best how healthy they are, how they feel. And so this question… these questions are how many days in the last 30 have you been either physically unhealthy or mentally unhealthy. And so whatever that means that individual that we want them to report and what’s great about this tools that CDC developed that back in the 90’s and it’s been validated repeatedly, it’s used in the breakfast survey, it’s the heat measure and PQA has certified that it’s been published in 100 different peer reviewed journal articles and you know in the three years that we’ve been working with that we’ve published in other 50 publications.

Saul Marquez:
Wow.

Andrew Renda:
Between turn and honor goals and conference posters and things like that and really showed the correlation between healthy days and chronic conditions disease progression healthcare resource utilization and cost. So really really tight linear correlations and that really sort of give us confidence that we’re using the right metric.

Saul Marquez:
I got to give you and your team a lot of kudos for that Andrew because it’s it’s hard to land on a concrete measurement that works for social determinants. I mean a lot of provider systems are working hard to make this work. A lot of companies at that see the value are struggling to to deliver value props that tied on ROI and so kudos to you and your team for four coming up with that.

Andrew Renda:
Well thanks and actually I mean we didn’t come up with it with CDC….

Saul Marquez:
No yeah but like…

Andrew Renda:
That their measure but…

Saul Marquez:
Yeah.

Andrew Renda:
But yeah I’m putting it into our organization has been really helpful and in fact I had a really interesting opportunity just last week. I was in the Netherlands attending the conference. Hi John. And we did an interesting session there that I got to host really discussing the Healthy Days tool and discussing it as potentially a universal health related quality of life measure. And we talked about that Healthy Days has this ability to kind of transcend, culture, and language, and geography, that it can really be this lingua franca the sort of common language that we can all use to understand health. And that’s what I think the beauty in that tool is you know health means different things to different people but every individual knows what it means to be healthy. You know it could be you know I just I need to take care of my family around when I walk my daughter down the aisle or I need to get to work. It can mean all sorts of different things but really boiling it down to what is a healthy day to you has been really important and I think that again can transcend culture and race and ethnicity and geography and everything else. And it’s something that you know we can all agree that that’s the term we want to use to define population health, then we’re all speaking the same language. And we can use that almost as an early warning sign for other clinical gaps in care. So someone’s reporting many many unhealthy days in a month, then that sort of can start a conversation between a clinician and a patient to say “okay well what’s driving that? Is it a chronic condition? Do you have a social determinant gap that we need to address? Are you having challenges with access to care? Do you need help navigating your healthcare benefits?” You know it can be a number of different things. But using that healthy Days tool can only start that conversation between a clinician and a patient. That’s really what we like.

Saul Marquez:
Love the approach. Yeah that’s a great call out. And so how is it administered? Is it done through an online portal or through recording and how often?

Andrew Renda:
Yeah. So it can be done a number of different ways. The way we primarily use it is through voice activated technology kind of those robo calls that…

Saul Marquez:
Yeah.

Andrew Renda:
We’ve all had. So we use the Healthy Days tool really in three different ways. We use it as a population health surveillance tool. In that case we use the voice activated technology and we randomly sample our membership. So that’s a random representative sample with surveys from June through December every year to call roughly a million people a year and we get about 200,000 responses. We want to have a big enough sample that we can trend populations over time. So for our Medicare Advantage, commercial, or Medicaid, populations and then we want a specific geographies the communities where we’re doing our Bold Goal work we want to survey those. So that’s one way we do it. We also use healthy days as an outcome measure and interventions that we do. And so in that case it’s more of a sort of pre post surveying and that can be done by the clinician that can be integrated into an EMR. It can be done paper based. The only thing really it doesn’t really matter how you administer it. It only matters that you’re consistent through the course of an intervention. You can’t do a VET survey to start and then finish with a paper survey.

Saul Marquez:
Right.

Andrew Renda:
To use the same method for both. But the second. Second when we do it as an outcome measure and interventions in that case it’s really interesting because healthy days is almost a leading indicator. So often for the course of disease management or some type of intervention people start to feel better even before their biometric things change.

Saul Marquez:
Right.

Andrew Renda:
And so we’ll see their healthy days improve even before their HDA1C improves or their medication hearings or other clinical metrics like that. But then we see the clinical metrics change and eventually downstream, we hope to see the healthcare resource utilization the admissions and E.R. visits and cost decrease as well. So that’s the second one. And then the third wave is really exciting. And we use healthy days almost as a proactive interventional tool.

Saul Marquez:
Okay.

Andrew Renda:
So in particular in underserved populations like our Medicaid population. We will as we get these members in with us we’ll call them asking the you take questions and anyone that reports more than 20 unhealthy days in a month, then we’ll get an automatic callback from a healthcare navigator. And then now they’ll actually double click and go in and say “okay well is it that you need support with a chronic condition? Is it that you have social determinant gaps in care? see your food insecure you’re socially isolated you have transportation issues whatever. Or is it that you need to help navigating your your health plan and your benefit or just the healthcare ecosystem in general.” And so again you know as an interventional tool it really helps us understand that there is something going on with the patient and then it allows us to go in and start that conversation and figure out exactly what the root cause is.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Great great summary there Andrew. And so wow there’s one year left, are you guys close to 20%? I got to ask.

Andrew Renda:
Yeah that’s that’s another great question. Thanks for a… put me on the spot there. Originally it was 20% by 2020 and we are still…

Saul Marquez:
Something right. I mean you know…

Andrew Renda:
Absolutely we set goals just like the Health and Human Services organization within the government has they have. What is it call them. I’m blanking out health. Is it healthy. Healthy People 2010 Healthy People 2020 health you might run a 30 where they set these goals and the expectation is not that you hit every goal but making progress and then can reset goals and go forward. So we have a 20% goal by 2020 for our original 7 communities that we’re doing this work in because we like to call it sort of a dream with a deadline. Right. And in those original 7 communities I’ll say that they’ve performed at different levels. And that’s just the reality of population. You know you have inflow and outflow of people and you have people they get sick they get new chronic conditions they pass away. You have also have natural disasters you know in some of our markets where we’ve done this work and Florida and Texas and other places. There have been wildfires and hurricanes and floods and all sorts of you know locusts and you know all sorts of things. So you know what we see over time is that you know healthy days is a really sensitive tool and so year to year and month to month we can see ups and downs but generally in these markets we are making progress. So of the original seven on average we’ve improved about 3% which is not 20 but it’s physically significant improvements.

Saul Marquez:
It is.

Andrew Renda:
That’s we’re really proud of. And then within those seven they range from San Antonio is our best performing community and they’ve improved 10%. So halfway towards their 20% goal and then we have some that are on the other end of the spectrum where there’s really significant you know the opioid crisis this is a major issue and behavioral issues like you know suicide rates you know as well as natural disasters have really kept them from making really any progress. And so you know we’ve seen a big sort of variation and how different communities have performed. And the other pieces you know there’s external factors and there’s work that we’re doing and you know we’re still in a learning journey we’re testing and learning and understanding what social determinants what chronic conditions that we need to address and then what solutions are effective. So we do test and learn and if things work and we scale them and if they don’t work we stop them. But there’s a theory of critical mass that we’re striving to achieve and that’s the idea that within our population we need to impact a certain percent of those people in order to have an impact on the entire population. And so I think we’re still kind of at that stage where we’re scaling up interventions that are successful and then I’m hoping that you know rather than a linear curve of progress that we’ll have more of an exponential curve. So the progress is slow in the first few years.

Saul Marquez:
Yes.

Andrew Renda:
And as we hit our stride and as we scale interventions we’ll see more of an exponential improvement in healthy days in those last couple of years.

Saul Marquez:
Well hey congratulations Yeah. I mean you’ve got to be bold and you’ve got to be clear and your organization Andrew is doing both. So I definitely want to give major recognition to the work that you guys have done and continue to do. And I do believe that consistency is the name of the game especially with with what we’re doing in improving outcomes so keep with it.

Andrew Renda:
Yeah I mean I think you know again props to our CEO Bruce Broussard, that the Humana in general has always been pretty progressive you know in this space and population health and addressing social determinants of health. Our CEO likes to talk about right now are sort of strategy to address population and revolves around five what we call points of influence and you know the first is primary care. We think that primary care physicians are at the quarterback of the healthcare ecosystem a often certainly they they have a direct relationship with patients and we care deeply about primary care about wellness checks about prevention kind of work. But primary care docs are also almost a liaison and between the sort of traditional healthcare system which is pharmacy and hospital and E.R. and all those thing. But they’re also they help connect patients to community resources when we have those social determinants need if you need a food bank, if you need a community center, if you need public transportation, they can be that liaison and so I think primary care is really important. Pharmacy is really important. So many people now you know have hypertension or they have things like that they need medications pharmacy is really important. Behavioral health, as I’ve said throughout this this conversation is absolutely critical. It’s something that you know we need to bring into the limelight. We need to understand that these behavioral conditions are far more prevalent than we might expect. We need to dedicate resources we need adequate networks of clinicians to address. Another one is home health you know home health is becoming really important as people want to age in place they want care brought to them as opposed to having to go out to different places and so I think home health is really important. And again near and dear to my heart the fifth point of influence is social determinants of health. And I think that’s something that we just haven’t talked about in a long time and we’re finally bringing social determinants of health to the forefront, we’re really treating them like the clinical gaps in care that they are.

Saul Marquez:
Well some great things to think about folks. And as you think through what Andrew just just discussed, don’t be afraid to hit the rewind button and replay, take some notes on this. It’s a good one. So what’s one of your proudest experiences to date here in the last three years Andrew?

Andrew Renda:
Well I mean it’s actually really hard to narrow down to one single thing. I mean I think honestly my my most gratifying and proudest experience is this job that I have right now. I’ve been at Humana for eleven years now and I’ve been on this population health team for three now and it’s just been the most fun job, the most challenging job I’ve ever had. I just love that Humana has given me the permission space to really address Population Health, to look upstream to address these social determinants of health. And I’m just really proud of what we’ve done. We have developed a robust research and publication portfolio because I believe if we’re going to convince clinicians to address social determinants we need to get this information out in peer reviewed journals you know to have peers kick the tires and say yes these are the right insights and conclusions and you know we have like I said almost 50 publications that we’ve done in the last three or four years. I’m proud of the social determinants interventions that we’ve done I mentioned the randomized controlled trial that we’ve done but you know we’ve done other interventions to address different social determinants. In the last year we screened over 500 thousand of our members for social determinants gaps and that’s something we’ve never done before. And I’m just incredibly proud that our team was able to do that just through our various wellness platforms and disease management platform screening half a million people and not just screening when it comes to social determinants it can’t just be about screening and saying okay great thanks for that information offering them something you know whether it be a referral or an intervention or something. A resource is really critical and so I’m incredibly proud that we’ve screened and intervened with that many people. I’m also proud of our analytic tools. We’ve launched an analytic tool just in the last few months called Zoom in and it’s a publicly available tool anybody can access it. You know humana.com/zoomin data visualization tool with over a hundred different social determinant data sets from CDC from Robert Wood Johnson from census data and it enables you to pinpoint a location whether it’s a practice or where a patient live and hit map a number of different things. So do they live in a food desert. You know are there food banks around looking at prevalence of different conditions. It’s a really really robust data visualization tool. And the other component of it is it has a community resource directory integrated into it and so it ends up being not just sort of diagnostic tool to understand what those gaps are but it also is an interventional tool because if someone lives in a food desert you can overlay food banks there and then say well here’s your nearest food bank. So it’s something that you know a physician can use in their practice. It’s something that our care managers use telephonically when they’re doing disease management with patients. So that’s you know again I’m proud of so many things that we’ve done between research between interventions and between data and analytical tools that we’ve done it’s just been it’s been a fantastic journey and certainly it’s not over yet. We have a lot more work to do.

Saul Marquez:
That’s awesome. Congratulations that zoom in to sounds very useful.

Andrew Renda:
Yeah absolutely. I mean as I said it’s it’s a new tool so right now it has about 50 cities in the tool itself and in the next month or so it’s going to have over 200 that we’re actually actively looking in this case right now. So we’re we’re looking for physicians to partner with hospital systems. We’re certainly integrated into our internal disease management programs but use cases we will publish our findings we’d like to validate the tool that it does in fact do what we expect it to do. But yeah I’d say it’s a really robust tool. Really proud of it. And as I said it’s publicly available now we’re not keeping it behind a firewall or putting it out there for people to use because our mission is to improve the health of the community if we serve it’s not just about our members but it’s about the communities they live in it’s that whole theory of rising tide raises all ships.

Saul Marquez:
Brilliant, brilliant and folks there for those listening we’ll leave the link to the tool as well as all of the other things that we’ve discussed today with Dr. Andrew Renda from Humana here. We’ll leave all that in the show notes. It’s humana.com/zoom in but go to outcomesrocket.health and the search bar type in Renda as Dr. Rand or type in Humana and you’ll see this podcast pop up with all the details and links. And also if you’re wanting to contribute to this project at the end of the podcast here, we’ll leave you the best way to connect with Dr. Renda and his team to help with that tool. So Andrew it’s time for for the lightning round so I got a couple questions for you followed by a book that you recommend to the listeners. You ready?

Andrew Renda:
Sure.

Saul Marquez:
All right. What’s the best way to improve healthcare outcomes?

Andrew Renda:
For me there’s a couple of components to that. And like I mentioned before I think giving equal weight to mental and physical health is really important. I think it’s about disease prevention, about stabilizing chronic disease. It’s about using all the assets at your disposal people, technology, data, using all those things to improve health for an individual and for populations.

Saul Marquez:
What is the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid?

Andrew Renda:
Again I’m going to go back to what I’m really passionate about right now it’s social determinants of health. I think the biggest mistake we can do is to ignore the social, economic, environmental aspects of health. We focus only on the disease itself. You’re ignoring the root cause of how the disease originally manifested. And you’re ignoring things that are likely exacerbating those conditions.

Saul Marquez:
Powerful. How do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change?

Andrew Renda:
Yeah that’s a great question. I mean I think you know it read, study, research. You know I think certainly look at that peer reviewed journals but I think also you know pay attention to thought leaders, read up ads, see what’s happening on LinkedIn, check your competitors, see what they’re publishing see what they’re doing you know make sure that you’re staying relevant. I think all those things are just a matter of paying attention of reading. That’s the way to do it.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. And what’s one area of focus that drives everything in your organization?

Andrew Renda:
Yeah I mentioned it before. It’s population health. I mean that’s really what we’re about is is about improving the health of populations the communities that we serve and I think it comes down to those five points of influence: Primary Care, Pharmacy, Behavioral Health, Home Health, and Social Determinants of Health. Those five things working towards the idea of improving the health of populations.

Saul Marquez:
Doesn’t get any clearer than that folks. Thanks Andrew. And in these next two or more on a personal note, what’s your number one health habit?

Andrew Renda:
Number one health habit. You know I… for us I am married I have three kids and we like to stay active. My kids are nerds like I am and so they’re not they’re not fantastic exports but we love being outside and so what we do together we’d like to hike. You know we just like to be outside state parks national parks splashing in creeks just staying active and I think just being outside, getting our heart rate up, and spending time together is really what keeps us healthy.

Saul Marquez:
That’s awesome Andrew. Yeah we love that too. My sons too. And we love to go to the forest preserve and his favorite thing to do is hike and throw sticks into the river.

Andrew Renda:
Yeah yeah I think that’s pretty common. Some of my kids like the same thing it’s throwing rocks and sticks in the creek.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah it’s a lot of fun. That is fun. And what’s your number one success habit?

Andrew Renda:
Yeah it’s another great one. I mean to me it’s about work life balance, it’s understanding what’s important that you know it’s really easy to get caught up with the idea of career progression of you know answering the 500 emails you get every day, of traveling for work, and speaking engagements. But you know I think you always have to go back and remember what’s important and that’s family and kids. And so you know it’s not always easy but I try to balance my travel and my speaking engagements and my work with a coach my kindergartner soccer team and I’m the scout leader for my third grader and I really feel like it’s important especially in those early years to be you know an engaged parent. And so just keeping that balance, I think ultimately makes me more successful because I have a better perspective on things.

Saul Marquez:
That’s great Andrew. I applaud you for that. It’s definitely not easy to do and that it’s not. But you know what you’re you’re focused year you’re clear on it and that’s why you’re doing it so kudos.

Andrew Renda:
Really.

Saul Marquez:
So what book would you recommend to the listeners/

Andrew Renda:
Yeah it’s another you know I know I’m giving you lots of multiple answers to two simple questions. I’ll give you a personal one and one that’s more related to population health. My favorite book of all time is the Count of Monte Cristo, Alexandre Dumas is the my favorite author for a long time. I just love the vivid way that he writes the way he describes things and and the Count of Monte Cristo as a story of redemption. You know this idea of bad things happen to this person and he starts out thinking about revenge but ultimately he doesn’t take revenge because it’s about redeeming himself and making himself a better person I just I just love that. And so more relevant to population health I would say as Blue Zones, Blue Zones the whole you know kind of mission almost. But the Blue Zones solution that original book is always fascinated me. It’s this idea that there are these spots around the world where people live to be you know an hour older than 100. And how do they do that. It’s their lifestyle it’s what they eat it’s how they live their lives. And to be able to understand how that happens and to take some of those best practices and apply it to myself personally and to our organization is always just kind of inspired me.

Saul Marquez:
That is inspiring, some great recommendations there Andrew and folks again a reminder to go to outcomesrocket.health in the search bar type in Renda as Dr. Andrew Renda or type in Humana and you’ll get links to our conversation, a full transcript, the short notes, to help you get informed on this podcast today. So Andrew this has been a ton of fun. I mean I’ve really enjoyed our discussion. If you can just leave the listeners with a closing thought and then the best place where they could learn more or continue the conversation with you.

Andrew Renda:
Yeah absolutely. Well you know I’m a broken record but I just believe that social determinants of health are so important to address and so I just feel like we need to stay the course with that I recommend everybody to focus on that within their organizations. And what I would say is talking about the business case, talking about money in relation to you know addressing social determinants should not be considered a dirty topic. I think in order to make addressing social determinants sustainable, we have to understand that business case, the ROI on that work and we just have to bring social truants in as clinical gaps in care. We have to address them. You know a stand on interventions we have to integrate them into our clinical operating models and we have to figure out what the ROI is and what that timeframe is. And I think if we do those things, we’ll make this work sustainable and scalable, we’ll be able to influence more people. So that’s the message that I would leave folks with. And in terms of getting a hold of me, you can get a hold me at my Humana email address. It’s a renda1@humana.com, I’m also on LinkedIn. So feel free to shoot me an email an idea. Love to connect in with like minded folks.

Saul Marquez:
A great great invitation for everybody listening. If you feel like you could contribute to the work being done here, raise your hand reach out and you’ll find his email address and a link to his LinkedIn profile in the show notes. So go home…

Andrew Renda:
And say one oh…

Saul Marquez:
Yes.

Andrew Renda:
Oh one other thing I forgot to mention that if anyone is interested in learning more about our Bold Goal population health work we do have a website. It’s humana.com/boldgoal. And on that it has you know I have some of our research that has you know the work that we’re doing in communities and examples of interventions. And it has our most recent progress report. Every year we release publicly a progress report to show kind of where we are in our in our journey towards improving health by 20%. We just released our most recent progress report about two weeks ago that was on that site. You can download it and have a look at it lots really good information in there.

Saul Marquez:
Great call. Glad you mentioned that Andrew. That’s humana.com/boldgoal and we’ll leave that link there in the show notes as well. A true privilege and pleasure to have had you here on the show today Andrew so really want to give you a big thanks on behalf of all of us.

Andrew Renda:
Well I appreciate you having me. This is a great podcast appreciate the opportunity it’s been a fun conversation and I look forward and accepts.

Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast. Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.com for the show notes, resources, inspiration, and so much more.

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