Caring for Our Children’s Mental Health and Well-being
Episode 529

Damayanti Dipayana,  CEO and Co-Founder of Manatee

Caring for Our Children’s Mental Health and Well-being

In this episode, Damayanti discusses children’s challenges and how her company empowers families to help children with behavioral problems through technology. She shares her thoughts on parenting, reaching goals, gamification, and collaboration between parents and care providers. Damayanti’s story and challenges are something start-up entrepreneurs can relate with. Please tune in to listen to her surprising insights!

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Caring for Our Children’s Mental Health and Well-being

Episode 529

About Damayanti Dipayana

Damayanti is the CEO and co-founder of Manatee. She’s been a part of various high growth D.C. back tech start-ups and has managed and built high performing cross-functional teams in Europe, Amsterdam, London, and North America. She has lived and worked in 9 unfamiliar countries across Europe, Asia, North, and South America and traveled through a bunch more. Prior to Manatee, she has also founded the award-winning video production company, Be Frank. Be Frank has shot thought-provoking campaigns with clients like Planned Parenthood and is all about challenging existing assumptions through honest conversation.

 

Caring for Our Children’s Mental Health and Well-being with Damayanti Dipayana, CEO at Manatee transcript powered by Sonix—easily convert your audio to text with Sonix.

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Welcome to the Outcomes Rocket podcast, where we inspire collaborative thinking, improved outcomes and business success with today’s most successful and inspiring health care leaders and influencers. And now your host, Saul Marquez.

Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket, Saul Marquez here today I have the privilege of hosting Damayanti Dipayana, She’s the CEO and co-founder of Manatee. She’s founded Manatee to make mental health care for kids massively better through leveraging technology and engaging the family outside of the session. She’s been a part of various high growth D.C. back tech startups and has managed and built high performing cross-functional teams in Europe, Amsterdam and London and North America. She’s lived and worked in 9 different countries Europe, Asia, North and South America and traveled through a bunch more prior to Manatee. She also founded the award winning video production company the Frank. The Frank has shot thought provoking campaigns with iconic organizations like Planned Parenthood and is all about challenging existing assumptions through honest conversation. Such a privilege to have Damayanti here and it’s going to be a great session. So Damayanti thanks so much for joining us today.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Thank you so much for having me. I’m excited to do it.

Saul Marquez:
Likewise. And so you’re tackling an important problem. We’re gonna be diving into the solution. You provide how it’s different and the opportunity that we have here in the U.S. health care system to address mental health for children. But before we dive into all of that, I’d like to know, what is it that inspires your work in health care?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah, I think it’s a it’s a combination of things. I mean, maybe people gathered from the traveling, but I’m actually or an airbase in Western Europe and in the Netherlands. And I think when I moved to the U.S., one of the most striking differences is for sure the healthcare system. So I went over to New York to build a team for a startup. And one of the big requirements was actually also figuring out, you know, what we’re going to do around health insurance for this team that I was building. And it was just mind-blowing. I think that was one little aha moment that I would say this is, you know, this is not sustainable. There needs to be a different approach to this. And then the other piece is much more like a personal piece piece. But I grew up in a very narrative averse family. So therapy was just really a big part of me growing up. And through that, I just understood kind of the challenges but also the opportunities that therapy provided. And so, yeah, it’s the culmination of a few things. I think specifically mental health care was something that I’m very passionate about and I just have a lot of experience with as well. And then healthcare as a brother, team I just don’t get me wrong. We’re not perfect either. By no means. But I do know what it can look like. And that’s really, really inspiring.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. Now it’s both personal and also a drive of yours. And I appreciate the passion that you have. So you’ve landed on an opportunity to really hyper focus on mental health care for kids. I love for you to to educate us a little bit on on the problem. Help us understand the problem a little bit more and then help us understand what makes you guys different and what exactly it is that you guys do at Manatee.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Absolutely. So I think there’s well, even though it feels hyper focus, I think it is a much wider problem than people realize. So in the US, you have 17 million kids who are have a diagnosable behavioral mental health disorder. That is a huge number. That’s 20 percent. That’s 1 in 5 kids. And that number is also growing year over year, specifically in areas such as anxiety, ADHD diagnosis are have increased 50 percent. Autism diagnosis has increased by 200 percent in the past decade. So that’s a really big growth. And without actually going into detail what causes that growth to matter the fact is that it is an issue that we really do need to address. And right now, the way that we approach it, it’s either taboo or it’s a luxury. Right. So either we don’t talk about it at all and we pretend everything is totally fine. And for families to do acknowledge that there is an issue or can acknowledge that there is an issue. Then you have this really big access problem where ultimately you just have to have resources to even get the care that you need. So just to illustrate that further, 50 percent of counties in the US do not have any mental health support, meaning no social worker, no pediatric psychologists, no psychiatrist, nothing though there is a geographical issue there. But then if you look at it from just financial resources, 50 percent of providers don’t accept insurance. Why? Because reimbursement is so low. So then, you know, people have to pay out of pocket and how many people can do that? So there just in general, like there is really big growth of the market and it’s an issue that we need to address. But then the way that we’re addressing it really leaves out the majority of the U.S. population. And for kids in specific or in particular, it’s something that I’m super passionate about because it’s just. Makes so much sense if we do not notice the first thousand days of a child’s life are the most important. In general, full stop is the most important part time in our lives in terms of neuroplasticity. And then on top of all that, if we don’t address some challenges and issues, when a child is a child, we know that it’s going to be a much bigger problem when they go into adolescence and adulthood and it’s much more costly. So for me, there’s no other sensible way of addressing this issue rather than addressing it. When a child is a child and actually being more preventative.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I think it’s a good call Damayanti and by the way, just to note that the hyper focus is actually a good thing.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah, I know I know.

Saul Marquez:
Gosh. I mean, the healthcare economy, we’re talking 3.4 trillion dollars Right? It’s more than a vertical to move the needle on anything you need focus. And that’s something that we talk about a lot on the podcast. So it’s a great thing. And you’ve honed in on a focus problem that is broad in its nature. So I appreciate the education. I mean, the counties that don’t have care, providers that don’t accept insurance, there’s a huge opportunity here. So walk us through what Manatee does. And by the way, folks, if you’re curious and you’re not driving, I tell you. Check out their website to its get Manatee.com to E’s manatee. So tell us a little bit about what makes you guys different and how you’re solving for the problem. And then also more about the name. Why Manatee?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah, I’ll start with why Manatee. I think anybody who’s ever started a business or even for that matter, named anything, including maybe naming your child, naming something is really hard.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah.

Damayanti Dipayana:
So I just had a list of names and I just couldn’t figure out what I want to call the company. And then I realized, like, what? What do you most kids like? And most kids like animals like right.. What are some weird and interesting animals? And I threw in a bunch of other names that were maybe more clinical or more descriptive. And then I genuinely just posted it on a bunch of rabbits. So I put it on the autism Rabbit, the ADAC Rabbit, the tons rabbit, and I just ask them to vote on the name that they felt was most appropriate for the solution that we were going to build. And Manatee was the winner. So we just went with that. And I felt that we also ask people for to give a reason why they felt that that was most appropriate or they like that name the most. And the reasons were really interesting and really thoughtful. So it was kind of like an easy decision from that point on it.

Saul Marquez:
Was it?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yes, that’s right.

Saul Marquez:
And which one of the most interesting facts of manatees?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Well, one thing that I thought was really interesting is that phonetically, it sounds like mental or management, you know, mental management. So like people like like that. But I think more importantly, most kids and especially kids that had these ratios were like this is sort of the manatees really do things like we can just imagine a massive floating through the water. And I think that was interesting. They had a really fun visual youth that they thought that when they thought of manatees. So I know that was a good thing.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. Yeah. And they’re like gentle giants, right they move slowly, peacefully. Yeah, I like it. I like it. So tell us a little bit about the solution. What you guys solving what he’s solving for?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah. And to tag on to your point. We actually focus even further because the problem that I just sketch is very large and very big. So we really want to focus on. All right. What is the number 1 pain point right now for families who are in therapy? And it really came down to communication, all sides. Right.. So parents felt that they weren’t involved in therapy. Kids felt they didn’t get directive support. And therapists felt that they had no view on what was actually happening because they only see a child maybe 1 hour out of 168 hours a week. Do you really want to focus on solving that first and getting clinical validation around that? So we launched 3 months ago, so not that long ago, and we build a platform that ultimately does really streamline the goal setting process. So a clinician sets goals and interventions. It’s a super straightforward dashboard that we felt for them. Then those goals are instantly shared with 2 with an application. They just have a family at the parent will get notified that these are 3 things that we’re going to work on over the next few weeks. And then the child actually we gamified it whole process for them. So they also receive the goals that they need to do and work on. But every time they may achieve this goal, they collect points and then they can redeem those points with their family for fun rewards. So I think owning the remote control for 2 hours or taking a trip to the zoo or baking cookies, whatever floats their boats and they think that’s super fun. And it’s really nice for kids to get recognition from their family when they are making progress and then we also support them for a short helpful conversation powered by machine learning so they can actually chat with a little companion when they need it. And then depending on how they’re feeling and the contact, we give them a short exercise. That is all based on activity. That kids love and they engage with friends. But then also it provides additional information for the clinician. So all the data has been visualized in a dashboard. So the clinician can then see this is not the treatment at errands and compliance. These are goals that are working really well. These are goals that are not working well. And by the way, this is how my client or patient has been feeling over the past week or 2 weeks. And this is why. So all of a sudden, this session is significantly richer and it’s much easier to actually track progress.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, and you call it out at the beginning, Damayanti like there’s this session and it’s 1 hour and that’s it. I mean, how do you expect to make progress if you’re just doing sessions that are isolated from the rest of every day?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Exactly. And I think this is a psychological piece that in general families and parents really want to be involved, like they want to feel like they. I think that there the psychological pieces, I don’t as a parent. There’s no handbook or guideline on how to be a parent. Not I think it can feel really. It can be just to really frustrating to have a situation as a parent you don’t know how to deal with. And so that parent training and support, I think is equally important to so that parents are like, oh, I know what to do or I know how I can make an impact on my child’s life in a positive way. And I don’t necessarily have to be an expert because I’m an expert in my child.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Yeah, it’s a great area to focus in on and and communication. Right.. How do we do it consistently. So is there anything out there? Is there any digital solution like this out there today?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Not necessarily in this way. So there are definitely a few players in this space are super interesting. But I think historically it really has been we focus on record keeping. So 8 hours and you know, they do some of I suppose like tracking and people will put things in there. Know that you have things around like central, one of the companies is called Central reach they’re very big in the office space. Stay there for that purpose. They’re internal. They’re for record keeping, not necessarily for external communication. And they do have consumer facing. And so you really it’s a large range, whether it’s like head space for kids or stuff re-think or Sesame Street even or calm. But all of those are really focus on the consumer. But there’s no integration into the health care system. That’s really like the landscape, how I see it in there. And there you are seeing, which I think is really interesting and they’re very nicely in line with our vision. You do see no technology enabled the next popping up that I am very curious about how how they’re going to tackle the market. But I think really enabling digitally enabling clinicians and providing better care for children with the Accra health needs. There is very little out there.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I know. It sounds like you’re you’re honing in on an area that can make a big difference for those of you listening, thinking through whether it be your own child or thinking about the enterprise as a health care provider or even as a payer wanting to take care of populations. We all know that one in five people, whether it be kids or adults, same statistics, Right? There’s a mental health opportunity to address. And if we’re not addressing them upfront, we’re going to be paying the price later in outcomes and in issues that come up. So I think this is a really interesting opportunity for us to explore what Damayanti and the team at Manatee is doing. What would be the best way for them to engage with you and your team?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah. I mean, you can, of course, get to the website that forms in their on there. You can just contact us for anything. Just email us at helloatgetmanatee.com and we’ll pick it up.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. So there’s a there’s an opportunity to connect, engage and maybe you’ve been thinking about this and you may haven’t started with the solution part of the problem. The beauty of what we do here on the podcast is that we put people together with solutions to problems so that we can make outcomes better and improve business. So as people are thinking about the next steps in their journey. I love to hear from you. I know it’s 3 months in. So it’s it’s still early. But do you have any any stories that you’d like to share on the platform has helped?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah, I mean, we have a lot of engagement already. So I think the user stories are really powerful and probably the most heartwarming. But we have parenting. I mean, we have over half of the families are using Manatee are already saying that it has improved the behavior of their child. We’ve already seen changes in behavior and over 61 percent on the thing, What’s the last measurement? A family say that it has really pretty dramatically increased their ability to achieve goals. Those are among the soccer stars. They’re just, you know, notes and messages that you gather around. I cannot believe it. My my son has really reduced the number of 10 friends and kids love it. I think that was the most interesting piece that I was always very skeptical whether kids would actually like it. But their biggest supporters. We have a hung up on the oldest serving that we’ve done 100 percent of it. They want to continue using manatee and we’ll be very disappointed if they didn’t use it anymore. So that is incredible. And then if I just look at our metrics, I’m just opening it up now because I want to make sure that I’m not lying. But in the past 3 months, we’ve had families achieve 13 hundred and 32 goals. The number of goal completions per child is 8.83. So in only a short period of time, kids have achieved almost 10 goals already.

Saul Marquez:
Is that because of the gamification and the interface?

Damayanti Dipayana:
I think it’s a combination of a few things. I think it also looks like, you know, I cannot undervalue also they may be worth it our clinicians are doing. We do work with incredible partnered adult. Yeah. One of our pilot sites is in Children’s Wisconsin. like they have an amazing team. So I think it’s a combination of the relationship that since clinicians have with the families. But for sure, the gamification really helps. I think it’s the recognition. And I think it’s also the first time that families see goals in that way. I think mental and behavioral health care historically has just felt always a little fluffy Right? like it’s that it’s a conversation that is between 2 people and then it’s really hard to translate that over. And something tangible to seeing this in something tangible like that’s really compelling for both parents and children.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. So thinking through, you know, so you have your your early partners right now, you’ve got you’re working with children’s hospitals across the country. Obviously, there’s an invitation to others that aren’t using you guys to engage, connect for a demo, reach out to learn more. How about if there’s somebody listening to this that says, yeah, I’m unsatisfied with the care my kid is receiving right now? How do you encourage them to reach out or, you know, what’s the what’s the pathway there?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah. So it’s something that I was actually very passionate about it for right now, the app itself. So that will not come with like a dashboard that’s integrated within the workflow of the clinician, but the family app itself, It’s completely free. So families can just go to the app store or Google Play store, whether it’s under some download the app search manatee. And it’s the first up that will pop up. They can download it, set up the family. And the nice thing is that actually we filled our school libraries for family. So our goal libraries are built with a clinical psychologist and we break them up into really helpful categories. So you have a category that’s so focused around communication skills or social anxiety or self-esteem and confidence so they can read through those goals. And I always suggest that collaborative work in a family work best. So, you know, sit down with their kiddo and run certain goals and ask what they want to work on, set them up and, you know, take it from there.

Saul Marquez:
Love it then I just went into the app store. You type in Manatee, M A N A T E E and there it is. It’s the first one. So this is kind of a starting point. And then would they be able to find their their care provider on here or or that’s separate. They would be more like hey talking to your provider directly and asking if they’re engaged.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah. If they are working with a care provider. The easiest thing to do is just to reach out to your care provider and offer them to reach out to us when we then engage with providers. It’s really easy to link accounts. So even if you as a family’s maybe even working with Manatee for a bunch of months, we can always link it with therapists. They can’t. And then you can work all together. That’s easy to add additional people to your support system.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. So so let’s just say somebody is not working with the provider that’s not currently working with you guys. And 6 months go by they’re loving the app. And then finally, they decide to do it at the hospital or at the clinic. And then that integration can happen pretty easily.

Damayanti Dipayana:
That’s exactly right.

Saul Marquez:
Very cool, very cool and how about on the provider side? Is everybody listening? Well, knows it’s hyper connected world now EHR is our a must. How do you guys integrate with the EHR?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yes, it’s a good question. It’s very interesting. Actually, it’s one of the first questions we get when we start talking to providers. And then when we asked to scope it out, what that actually would look. No provider yet has us like this actually needs to be integrated with these are just because it’s actually quite different right now, because we focus on the communication with the family. We have found that there is no real major use case yet to do a full on integration. What we do do, however, is we are making it really easy to export data from our platforms. So we’re actually working on a bunch of features that either make it easy just to copy and paste or it makes a very nicely summarized statement that is particularly helpful for reimbursement purposes. So for example, Kid X has achieved X goals in relation to Y over the past X time period to really focus on progress. And then the third one is just being able to download like a summary page. They can just attach it as an external document if need be or any other additional information that you just want to attach to your profile or the health record.

Saul Marquez:
Got it. Totally get it. Appreciate the insight there. Sounds like not really in need right now, but you’re making it easy to export data so that they could fill it in in a in a pretty seamless way.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Exactly. And we’ll also continue to build out the API so that if more and more health care providers actually work with, say, that where as is well. So you can just really easy pulling data from our system into your own system.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Some great, great tidbits here. So we’d love to hear what you have found has been maybe one of the biggest setbacks. I know it’s early on, but what’s been one of the bigger setbacks and what did you learn from that to make what you’re doing even better?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah, it’s a good question. I think the starting company is kind of riddled with setbacks, but it is somewhere in like a dark corner of your mind. I think when for me it was more team related. So I really wanted to start with someone who would be my technical co-founder and very early on I’m really excited said building things and then he actually decided to not pursue it. That was a very early setback where you have this moment. Am I going to pursue this by myself? I mean, I decided to do it and then found like my dream technical partner. So it all worked out. But that was a really big step back in the beginning. But I now don’t think I didn’t realize like how I can remember. I just be like crying on my lap, being like, oh, my God, how am I going to see you without the person who’s supposed to build this with me? And other more setbacks there just. You will have people that you don’t believe in it. I think my my it’s a critique that I laugh about a lot because it is so painful. But I just remember like an investor looking at me and it seemed like this is so incremental. Hey. It’s like the equivalent of somebody calling you. Yeah, he’s nice. You know, it’s it’s it’s all in all everything else. I feel like we’ve been what really like help us continue just growing and building is this family’s story and also story that this is really a see a change. And like we’ve led value for them, unlike one family story, like my family setup is different and we’re having more positive time when we hang out and we will pull back unless you like. Easy 3 months.

Saul Marquez:
Oh, for sure. For sure. Now. And I think it’s a good call. Right. I mean, that BC be like that’s incremental. OK, there’s the incremental could actually be exponential. Think about something. And like I know an analogy that I think many, many have heard about. It’s like if you’re an airplane and you shift 3 degrees and you were supposed to go from New York to L.A., you’ll end up in Washington somewhere. Yeah. And it’s just that consistency. So I think it’s I think it’s cool that you stayed strong with your vision Damayanti And these things at the end of the day will make a difference because it impacts patient lives, the quality of care, satisfaction, all these things are real.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah. No, I completely agree. And I think also, you know, you have to start focusing by just going back to your point. I think if you even look at the largest companies, Amazon was an online bookstore. That’s how they started. over started as like a black car luxury service. And, you know, now they completely shifted the paradigm of transport. So, yeah, I just think it’s a funny critique that it it’s like it’s this really snarky one that I consider like laughing about and like, oh, and this is also during sector. So all my other founder classmates would say, just bury me along with it if it was a lot of banter.

Saul Marquez:
That’s funny. Well, that’s the power of entrepreneurship. And like you said, Right. take those that negativity and put it somewhere, you know, take what you can from it to learn and get better. But then, you know, push it off to the side and don’t let it distract you.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Exactly.

Saul Marquez:
It’s a great message, Damayanti what would you say is one of the proudest accomplishments, whether it be in your career, because you’ve done a lot of really cool things or with within this this company?

Damayanti Dipayana:
I definitely say just starting this latest thing. I think it’s easy to underestimate. I underestimated how hard it is to actually build something. So just now, being the product. I think the proudest moment was. And I also didn’t believe it when we actually got feedback back from 1 of our surveys, And like a family love manatee. And I just didn’t believe it. I’m like, I started. My husband, my friend. You know, the survey is actually real or like if there is positive review that we got on the App store. I think that’s a really sad note, because it’s the first time that you realize that something that you feel and what’s in your head actually makes sense in the real world. And then I would say another really proud moment to say in general is I get a lot of energy and satisfaction from building teams. And in that actually they could building and supporting other people. I wouldn’t say careers that feels like too big, but just helping them progress and grow. And I will say with some of these other companies that I work with, I would say my teams were always my proudest accomplishments. I would look around a team and I’d be like, these are just a group of incredible human beings that work so well together, that are growing, that are passionate. And I think that’s always outside of actually building stuff like looking at a group of people that you’ve collected and you’re supporting. I think that’s a really amazing accomplishment and very satisfactory.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. That’s definitely great Damayanti the power of teams. And yeah, I mean, you know, at the end of the day, it’s about leaving a mark and leaving the world better than when you got here. And I think you’re doing just that with this business. If you can have lunch with anyone, who would it be?

Damayanti Dipayana:
I would say finally, Angela Merkel. I think she’s as bad ass. And she’s German. I don’t know. Yeah, I think she sounds really cool. And such a seems like she never regardless, she always chooses courage over comfort. And I think that’s something that I tried to lift by. So be either her or. I mean, this is so cliche, but I’d be very intrigued with just having lunch with Elon Musk. I think he would think oh, differently to me that I would be just in all the entire time like me. That’s where your mind is going. I would be I would be for sure. Very that. Yes.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. How about on the books side? What book would you recommend to the listeners?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Ok. I’m going to be really honest. I just haven’t finished a book and I want to say a decade. I started a lot of books. I’m very good at starting books. But one that has really impacted me is I really like sapience. It’s much more broad. But I think just having a somewhat of an objective view of what it actually means to be human and just artistry, I think it puts a lot of things into context and gives you a slightly different perspective. This is how I measure advice. Have I changed my perspective or had this impact that my life in one way, shape or form? I would say sapiens is probably one that is on top of that list.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. Sapiens by Harari Right.. Yes. Correct. And what would you say is your number 1 health habit?

Damayanti Dipayana:
I’m actually a low stress. I think that’s probably my best health habit I have. I think it’s one of my better skills is that I’m pretty good at just, again, putting stuff in perspective and, you know, the power of relativity. What’s the worst that can happen? And I think that is really nice to keep yourself level head on. And also, don’t you I think it’s very easy to get burned out specifically in entrepreneurship. So I would say that I wanted to say, like I actually do tend to like move my body and work out, but I’d be lying. I think that’s the first one that goes.

Saul Marquez:
Fair enough. Yeah. But putting things in perspective is how you drive. It’s it’s definitely a key skill. It’s a habit. That’s awesome.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yeah. I actually want to add one more thing, if I may, just because I think it’s really…

Saul Marquez:
Sure.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Don’t talk about it. I actually have. And I wish more people get especially. I don’t want to make this a women thing, although I think women are much harsher on themselves. But one thing that I think it’s because of my parents, I actually have a lot of positive self-talk. Very rare that I would talk negatively about myself in my head, but it actually happens a lot. And that is something that I’ve noticed just working and being close to a lot of other founders. I think it’s a really good thing to start working on and making a habit. Every time we hear yourself talk negatively about yourself in your head to catch yourself and reframe it. So that’s another and I guess healthy habit. It’s just of this so far.

Saul Marquez:
Brilliant. If you don’t talk positively about yourself. Come on. It’s going to be hard out there, especially as a as a company founder. Right?

Damayanti Dipayana:
Yes, exactly.

Saul Marquez:
So how about on the on the advice side? What’s the best advice you ever received?

Damayanti Dipayana:
I don’t know if it’s a Best advice, but it’s something that probably helps me the most because I find this hard, for me choose your battles like I’m super passionate about a lot of things I can get really worked up about a lot of things, And it’s not sustainable. And I’m also naturally quite confrontational. It’s definitely in my family loves about me. And that was sarcastic. And I think I think for me, it’s always someone told me this very early in my career when I was even more confrontational and passionate, just, you know, choose your battles. So I think it’s something that really helps me, things that are situations and think about. All right. If I take this battle, what is the most likely outcome and what’s the most positive outcome? And like are either of those worth it? And 9 out of 10, it’s just. No. And then it’s not worth my time, energy resources and it’s much more productive. Give folks and other stuff. So for me, it’s probably choose my battles. But I think in general, I really love Tech Stars motto or core value, which is get first. And I think there is just so much power in it. I think a lot of times, especially in founder, entrepreneur safety world, everything, every interaction feels so transactional and kind of growth. But I think it really sets you apart if you just have that mentor like giving birth and you don’t expect anything back. And that actually will massively improve just the relationships that you have with people naturally anyway. So I think that’s a more general one. But for me, it’s definitely take my battle.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. Now I like it. 2 good ones. And at the end of the day, you want to be a go giver, not a go getter. You’ll have more success as that. And. Yeah. So, so Damayanti this has been a great chat. And the work that you guys are set on doing and improving mental health for kids is extraordinary. So keep doing what you’re doing. Leave us with the closing thought. And the best place for the listeners can continue the conversation with you.

Damayanti Dipayana:
How I should prepare for this in. I would say my closing thought in general is I think if we all just focus on paying it forward and think of what is the one thing that you could do to help a young person in your lives, just gonna do that. I mean, it’s Christmas over after all. So it’s not a business one. You know, if you want to if you want to contact testier saying, contact us. But I think more broadly, if there’s one thing that you could do to help a young person in your life, go ahead and do it because it’s our collective future.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. A great closing thought. Help somebody that, you know, a child, help them out. And I think that ripple effect will be huge. And from a business standpoint, if you’re looking to see what Manatee could help you with go to getmanatee.com, but also check out outcomesrocket.health and in the search bar type in Manatee and you’ll find all of the discussion notes, the full transcript with a Damayanti here. And that’ll be where you go get that. So again, Damayanti, want to thank you again for your time and look forward to staying in touch.

Damayanti Dipayana:
Thank you so much for having me. It was a blast.

Thanks for listening to the Outcomes Rocket podcast. Be sure to visit us on the web at www.outcomesrocket.com for the show notes, resourses, inspiration and so much more.

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In this episode, you’ll learn:

  • How to overcome setbacks as a start-up entrepreneur
  • Finding opportunities when you’re hyper-focused on a specific niche
  • Motivational tips to overcome negativity and  use it to be better

 

Resources

https://getmanatee.com/