Improving Outcomes and Business through Data-Driven Insights
Episode 544

Timothy Barry, Director of Partnerships at Komodo Health

Improving Outcomes and Business through Data-Driven Insights

In this podcast, we interview Tim Barry, the director of partnerships at Komodo Health. Komodo is a health care technology and data company with the most sophisticated and structured data set in the market. I am amazed to learn about the company’s capability to structure data and build software solutions on top of it. He also shares how his company was able to track different spikes in utilization to impact cost and outcomes, pulling and tracking data information on COVID patients, and more.

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Improving Outcomes and Business through Data-Driven Insights

Episode 544

About Tim Barry

Tim is the director of partnerships at Comodo Health, a leading health care technology company with offices in San Francisco and New York. Prior to that, he spent several years in a growth equity investment company as well as consulting and management companies. He was also a co-founder and owner of REMOT Medical Innovation.

Tim is a BioMedical Engineering Graduate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

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Intro:
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Saul Marquez:
Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket. Saul Marquez is here. And today I have the privilege of hosting Tim Barry. He is the Director of Partnerships at Komodo Health, a leading health care technology company with offices in San Francisco and New York, Komodo Health tracks the unique patient journeys of over three hundred and twenty million patients across the US. The company recently raised 50 million dollars in Series C funding led by Anderson Horowitz. He focuses on the strategic partnerships across the healthcare ecosystem, including life science companies, payers, providers and companies which support them. He has spent the majority of his career focused on growth strategy, and prior to Comodo, he was a leading corporate development at a health care company at San Francisco. Prior to that, spent several years with global growth equity firm headquartered in Shanghai, and his experience is international. Even some time with Bain and Company, where he spent two years supporting Fortune 100 clients with growth strategy pricing and new market entry. He’s a he’s a Midwesterner and definitely excited to showcase what he’s doing at Komodo and what the company Komodo is doing to help offer value to the health care ecosystem. So, such a privilege to have you here on the podcast Tim. Thanks for joining.

Timothy Barry:
Saul, it’s a pleasure. Really great to be here today.

Saul Marquez:
Yes, sir. Hey, so. So the work you do is is awesome. And Komodo, certainly a unique value proposition from a data perspective and structuring data at it to do relevant things, offer insights. Before we dive into the amazing work being done at the company, I want to take a minute to just hone in on you and what inspires your work and health care.

Timothy Barry:
Yeah, my background in healthcare, both my parents worked in healthcare. My uncle is a doctor. Both my answer nurses. So, you know, from a young age, I was really inspired. I was always feel that I was going to. My original goal was to become a doctor, but I ended up going into biomedical biomedical engineering in school. I did a number of startup opportunities while I was in college, and it was just really inspired by all of the innovation that I find university. And then as I went into my career and started doing consulting at different types of investing work, I just realized you can have a huge outsized impact in the healthcare space. And, you know, there’s a lot of brilliant people and companies that are thinking of ways to bring. Whether it’s data, new treatments, new therapies to have a really positive impact. So, you know, it’s always a space I’ve been drawn to. And I think I landed in a spot that’s really a good fit for, you know, my interests, my skill set here in Komodo, doing partnerships.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, that’s pretty neat. And, you know, your your diverse experience really does lend well for a partnerships role. Having that industry wide view certainly is important. You know, we tend to silo ourselves in as providers or life sciences companies. But you’ve had that that ability to kind of see across the multiple aisles. So I think it’s it’s great that you’re doing what you’re doing now with them. What what would you say? You know, as far as Komodo health goes, what what is it that you guys are doing in adding value to the health care ecosystem?

Timothy Barry:
Yeah, absolutely. So Komodo is a very unique company and when I first learned about the company, I was so impressed by what they’ve managed to build. And really the way to think about it is committer has what we call the health care map. And you alluded to it earlier, but essentially we’ve managed to stitch together and reconstruct on a D. Identified basis the patient journeys. Three hundred and twenty million patients across the U.S. health care system, which it’s actually a pretty staggering number, and it’s the vast majority of the uninsured population. And there’s a number of different technology partners that we’ve worked with to make this possible. And we know we work with a number of different. We call them data principles. But you can think of companies such as large payers, revenue cycle management companies. We have these different data partnerships in place where essentially we’re ingesting what we call Encounter’s data, which is basically anytime a patient touches the healthcare system, you can think of a visit, whether it’s to an E.R., to an inpatient setting or an outpatient setting, or they get a new prescription filled. We are reconstructing these patient journeys for 300 between patients and then we are building software products on top of these structured data to serve insights and basically to power our partners to improve the work or the value that they bring to the market. So really, the way to think about Komodo is where health care technology and data company with the most sophisticated and structured data set in the market. And we work with a number of partners, as you mentioned, across the ecosystem. So whether it’s the life sciences space or payors providers, value based care companies, you name it, we serve them insights based off of the data so that.

Saul Marquez:
You know, it’s it’s super important to have the data and have a properly structured to make sense of it. That’s that’s a that’s where a lot of a lot of companies and businesses fail is structuring the data because it’s all there and it’s there and bits and pieces. So you guys are able to actually put it all together. Do you identify it and build a solution with software for the companies that you work with?

Timothy Barry:
Correct. What you know, you hit it on the head. I think structuring the data and making it is easily accessible and actionable for our partners. That’s been a major focus for Comodo. And if you look at our team right now, we based the series in …

Saul Marquez:
Congratulations.

Timothy Barry:
Thank you very much. Is it super exciting testament to the growth that we’ve had a major focus for our companies? We look at our headcount. We’re around about two to 50 total on place. A good chunk of those I saw in San Francisco, a good chunk of that office are data architects and data engineers. And their sole focus is to really look at for all the different data feeds and data principles that we work with. How can we ingest that data? How can we structure it? And how can we map it to a common schema to make it as easily accessible as possible? So really, it’s a major focus for our team and I think it’s something that’s a unique value added. Comodo. One of the things that you mentioned that is really critical that I’d like to stress, we have a partnership with a third party company that plays a tokenization software. And what’s unique is we were one of the first companies to partner with them and essentially how it works. Actually, somewhat similar to Bitcoin or cryptography, but it takes any identifiable information. It runs it through a one way conversion process where it turns it into a 44 character encrypted hash. So hypothetically, let’s say my name showed up on a healthcare claim to the contrary would have my age, gender, date of birth. It would convert that into a consistent 44 character hash that no matter where I was seen care, no matter who my insurance company was, let’s say I had a one year and the following their show. It would still be able to track all of my utilization. But in a hyper compliant, be identified manner. So what we’ve really done is we’ve taken all of these different data sources with tokenized them and then our data architecture and data engineering teams, they’ve mapped it to this common schema. So really, where we are today now, we have, you know, five plus years of utilization and Encounter’s history for all of these patients in a certified identified schema, which makes it much easier to then build models and build software on top of that data.

Saul Marquez:
You know, just that’s super cool. First of all, I’m curious. So do you actually not that it matters, but just out of curiosity, got trained to do that. Does it tokenization process this blockchain?

Timothy Barry:
So it’s it’s similar. It’s basically it is a software package. It’s actually a very lightweight chavas software package. And there’s a company out of San Francisco that often plays with software. So it’s a similar underlying technology. Yeah, it’s not on a ledger, but really what it is, it’s converting. It’s basically a one way conversion process. And you can’t then re identify. But it enables you to what’s really powerful about it. And, you know, a lot of the value that we is you can now link up data assets in the HIPAA complainant, the identified way across so many disparate sources, right.. And you think about you can get data from payors and no claims data from a number of different sources. But what’s really powerful, you can use that team tokenization, technology and other types of data. So think lab data, genomics data, clinical EHR data. So using the same patient token and you can really start to build out using a super comprehensive lead, data datasets, whether it’s for, you know, a very bespoke use case or for macro trends. It’s really enabled a whole slew of new types of analysis and new types of workflows for our partners, which is really exciting.

Saul Marquez:
That is exciting now. Thanks for sharing that more of a curiosity thing for us than anything else. So so talk to us a little bit about what you guys are doing specifically Right.. How are you guys adding value and maybe tuck maybe in within the context of what’s happening with covid. You know, today on the minds of a lot of health care providers and and really public leaders, reemergence, preparedness has been a key key area of focus. Tell us maybe how you guys are offering assistance there.

Timothy Barry:
Yeah, absolutely. You know, you hit it on the head right now. It’s obviously unprecedented times. And Komodo, it’s been top of mind for every single one of us at the company. How can we use the data we have and our solutions to really, you know, have a positive impact? And, you know, couple areas we’ve been focusing. One, we’ve actually in the last couple of months, we’ve become very focused on understanding changes in telehealth utilization and within our data because we’re seeing all of these patient level encounters and we can very accurately code them and understand types of care. We’re able to track, you know, the different spikes in utilization across the entire U.S. for for telehealth services. And as you might expect, in the last two months, there’s been a significant spike, but we can really drill into which specific physicians are NPI. Eyes are seeing the biggest increase. Where are they located? What different types of insurance? You know, we’re getting to the point now where we’ll have enough longitudinal data start to track impact and cost and outcomes. So that’s one area where we’re focusing as we think about the new normal with covid, telehealth will become increasingly important. And, you know, our company, we’re starting to put up white papers and blogs on how you can track telehealth utilization impact that will have for primary care. So that’s you know, that’s something that we’re very much focused on. And if you think about the emergence, you know, a major trend that we’re seeing as patients have been very hesitant to go into a hospital or a primary care clinic in person. So utilization has been incredibly low at many, many facilities around the country. So how can we give people confidence or, you know, had targeted messaging around the advent of telehealth, the availability, you know, different player groups that might be offering this as a benefit to the employee. So these are the types of things that we’re starting to think through and partner with our existing partners or particularly partners and bring some of that to market. So that’s one on covid specifically actually an opportunity that I’ve been fairly focused on. I mentioned this earlier, but a lot of our data is we call it in data that can take over. You know, anytime the patient goes to the clinic or a doctor’s office and gets prescriptions filled. So using the same token that I had mentioned, we now have the ability to pull in at the patient level, coded lab, an antibody test data to part of what we’re starting to do is map all of the different patients that either have tested positive or may have, you know, have an antibody test. And you can link that to their utilization history or, you know, the history from vacation or, you know, any other either demographic or clinical history information. And we can start to build out over time is a very comprehensive view of where the pockets of covid patients, where the really high risk populations. Are there any specific treatment protocols which seem to be more effective? You know, are there any high risk areas where maybe we want to put some protocols in place to limit exposure? We want to engage physicians in the particular community because, you know, we’re seeing just a higher number of positive antibody tests or tests. So these are all the things you know, we’re at the very early stages of figuring out how to bring in, you know, the lab testing data that’s now becoming more available. How can we tokenized that and link that to our data? And what are the signals that matter? We think it’s something that will increasingly become very valuable and impactful as we start to track the disease burden of covid 19 around the U.S. and all the different contextual elements that we can derive from the data that we’ve built up over time.

Saul Marquez:
And then it’s insightful. Oh, yes, please go ahead. No, no, no. Go ahead. Go ahead. All I’m saying Tim is that, you know, the the information that you could pull from this encounter data is insightful and it’s pretty timely, too. I mean, how relevant to by time? Is it like, you know, is it is it current?

Timothy Barry:
Yes. That’s a fantastic question. And I would say we we see anywhere from 15 to 20 million new encounters daily. So we do have some feeds which are essentially Real-Time. I would say the vast majority of our data will see any type of encounter within a month. So it’s real time to about a month lag. And that’s why, you know, especially today and June 1st, it will take a little bit of time to understand, you know, the full impact of different treatments or different drugs on any patient. Let’s say that started a new protocol to covid in April, right.. It will just take time for us if we were to go down that route to have a, you know, a longitudinal historical view. But, yeah, it’s something that, you know, we want to continue to monitor. And it’s going to be something that we’re talking about with all of our partners going forward.

Saul Marquez:
Fascinating. Very cool.

Timothy Barry:
And then one other thing, I’ll mention that, you know, I think it’s top of mind for a lot of people right now, including myself. It’s just, you know, between covid and some of the unrest in the US, it’s been a really stressful time. And a number of the partners that I’ve been talking to have been very focused on mental health. Whether it’s, you know, companies that are supporting their employees and offering novel benefits or treatment to mental health consultations or understanding mental health utilization, that’s an area of focus that, you know, it’s this is just as much a mental health crisis as a pandemic across the U.S.. Right. I think, you know, so many people are dealing with so many stressors and so much anxiety. And what we’re really looking to do is to find ways to support companies that are either bringing novel solutions or novel ways of identifying patients or, you know, comfort employees that might be struggling. And what can we do to better identify them and support these companies, whether they’re offering some type of novel treatment or proving the value of that treatment? So that’s an area of focus going forward that I think will be super relevant for us as well. I we when we think about the context of Covid and the environment.

Saul Marquez:
some great examples, Tim, thank you so much for those. And so as you reflect on your time there and, you know, some of the some of the successes and also some of the setbacks, would you say one of those key setbacks has been and what you and the company have learned from it?

Timothy Barry:
Coming back to covid, I think, you know, coming into this year, a big focus for me personally and was going to be focusing on supporting CROs and companies in the clinical trial and clinical research space. And, you know, just a massive shift to the industry. I alluded to it earlier, but, you know, utilization at hospitals, academic medical centers and clinics has been significantly down as patients don’t want to go in person to receive care. And then if you think about it from clinical research perspective, that makes it very, very difficult to recruit patients for clinical trials and clinical research. So, you know, really, a lot of that work has been put on hold for the last several months. And as a company and personally, I had to re-evaluate, you know, part of my partnership strategy and my focus and, you know, where are we going to spend our time and how can we support different companies across the health care system. So that was one where we thought it was going to be a major focus for us in 2020. We do see some trends that actually clinical research activity is starting to pick up. And I think, you know, come Q3, Q4 of this year, we might see a rebound. But, yeah, it’s you know, we we’ve tried to be very flexible to try and react to what’s happening in the market. What matters to our customers or to our partners. And really, how can we be nimble as a company to support the amazing work that our partners are doing? So that’s that’s really our mindset at Komodo is we know we have a lot of data. We have a super smart team and we know there’s a lot of value that we can add. So we’ve really tried to focus on where can we have the highest impact? How can we best support our partners, even if that means identifying different use cases are going down a different path than we originally anticipated.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, I think that’s that’s great, Tim, you know, the examples you mentioned around, you know, what happens if covid comes back, right. being able to help people with mental health, telehealth, reengaging, preparing. So definitely a testament to to the commitment you guys have to leveraging this data and insights to help health care providers and companies as a whole. What are you most excited about today?

Timothy Barry:
Yeah, I think in my position doing partnerships, part of what I love about it is I’ve been able to talk to so many different founders and companies and innovators in the healthcare space or, you know, smart entrepreneurs that want to help and they want to bring some of their expertise, whether it’s in machine learning or database structuring to health care, whether it’s for coding or for mental health or some of these definitions I touched on. And I’ve been constantly so impressed by, you know, the brilliance and the passion of some of the founders and the companies that I’ve spoken to. There are so many smart people that care deeply and are doing amazing work. And I just feel very humbled and happy that I’ve been in a position where I can even have some ability to support them or think through in ideato on some of these novel applications or novel digital therapeutics, novel treatment protocols that I think can be super impactful for so many people. So what I get really excited about is talking to people that are at the forefront that are really, you know, change makers, innovators and finding ways to help them. Right., that is a team. That’s what I love most about the partnership’s role. It’s what can I do to make your life easier and help you bring positive change to the world? So when I think about my role, that’s what really gets me excited. And that’s what yeah, that’s what’s really been great so far.

Saul Marquez:
And that’s great, Tim. And I mean, three hundred and twenty million Americans. I mean, this is just an insane amount of data. I mean, to be able to do that consistently and then offer insights and software built upon that to get insights, I mean, it’s just a pretty amazing solution. So, you know, kudos to you and the Komodo health team for. For all that you’re doing. What’s the best way for for people to learn more about what you guys do and how it could actually help them? Maybe even a demo like is there is there an opportunity for people to engage in that way?

Timothy Barry:
Oh, yeah, absolutely. Our Web site is KomodoHealth.com. And if anyone is interested or curious to learn more, you can reach out to me directly or you can find me on LinkedIn. Timothy Barry at Komodo health. My email is Timothy.Barry@komodohealth.com. But yeah, I would be more than happy to gauge or to walk to product demos. I think that’s the most fun part of my job. Really, really interesting and smart people and talking to potential use cases and novel ways. So I would be more than happy to any day. Listeners would be interested in getting in touch.

Saul Marquez:
There you have it folks. Tim is inviting you to chat.

Timothy Barry:
Yes, indeed. And talk your ear off. I got a lot.

Saul Marquez:
I love it. And the thing is, you know, folks, you know, when you there’s one thing they hear about a technology and what it could do. It’s another thing that actually see it. And, you know, I mean, I personally have not seen it, but I’ve but I’ve gotten a pretty firm understanding of what they could do and how they do it. You know, before Tim and I jumped on the interview, we had a good amount of time to catch up. And I asked a ton of questions, take him up on it. You know, you never know when you’re going to find the right thing for your business and especially these times. So take them up on that. So Tim, what are you reading lately and what would you recommend for us to to to read?

Timothy Barry:
Yeah. So actually, lately I’ve been trying to take my mind off of this. I’ve been reading more fiction.

Saul Marquez:
Yes you do. I don’t blame you.

Timothy Barry:
And the book that I’m reading right now, actually, my dad recommended it to me years ago and I’ve been putting it off, putting it off. And it’s called The Gentleman in Moscow. And there’s a very quick take away. So it’s set in Russia around the time where the Bolsheviks overthrew the czar. And there is a count who was set to be executed, but essentially he was able to negotiate his way into a life of quarantine in a hotel for perpetuity. And, you know, I’m still in the process of reading it. But the key takeaways are, you know, he manages to find happiness and solace in the smallest moments. And it really brings out his humanity and interacting, whether it’s with the hotel staff and the waitstaff and just learning to be content with so much less than he’s used to. And then he’s a musician. He’s sort of a renaissance man, which I really like. I love music. So I think a lot of his personality and character traits really resonated with me. And then in the current climate where, you know, many of us have been at home sheltering in place, I found it very, very relevant to know a lot of the same thought processes and struggles that I’ve been going through. So that’s why I’m only about a third of the way through, to be honest. So I can’t give you a full recommendation yet. But it’s been a very nice escape the last couple of weeks, reading what I said about a week ago. So it’s very insightful and great so far.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, that’s cool. That’s cool. Well, I appreciate that that recommendation Tim and sounds like a great recommendation from your dad and now from you too, to all of us listening. So, folks, if you want to get a link to that book, a link to Komodo health, to Tim’s email address and link, then go to OutcomesRocket.health and in the search bar type in Komodo k o m o d o. And you’ll find this shownotes there, the full transcripts and all the associated links. Make sure you check that out. Tim, this has been awesome, man. I mean, I really have enjoyed connecting with you and learning about the the data as a differentiator that you guys do. Leave us with the closing thought and the best place for the listeners. I guess it could engage you already provided that. So leave us with the closing thought.

Timothy Barry:
Yeah. First of all, thank you so much. It’s like what you just said. It’s been really awesome to connect with you both before and now during the actual interview here. And I love what you guys are doing. The podcast is fantastic. So we really appreciate the work you’re doing and I appreciate you having me on. You know, just a closing thought. Kind of day to iterate to reiterate what I said earlier. I’ve just been so impressed by everyone that I’ve interacted within the health care space, you know, coming together and looking at really creative ways to have a positive impact, right. whether it’s coded mental health, you know, many of the very pressing issues that would. And so there’s anything I can do to support you as you’re thinking of ways, well, for your business or personally to have a positive impact. I am always happy to talk. And, you know, even if there’s no business potential, I just really enjoy meeting the people and ideating. And I would be happy to connect with anybody so Saul, once again, I really appreciate the time and stay safe and healthy and that. Yeah, I wish you the best.

Saul Marquez:
Thank you, Tim. Same goes for you. And listenerstake takes him up on his invitation to connect. Definitely. Great, great gentlemen and professional. Can’t appreciate you enough Tim for jumping on with us. Thank you.

Timothy Barry:
You got it.

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Things You’ll Learn

  • We need to support heroes and companies in the clinical trial and clinical research space.
  • Be flexible in the healthcare market and react to what’s happening to customers or partners.
  • Find ways to make life easier and bring a positive impact on the world

 

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