Experience, Analyze, Get Better with XRHealth
Episode 440

Eran Orr, Founder, XRHealth & CEO, XRHealth USA Inc

Experience, Analyze, Get Better with XRHealth

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Experience, Analyze, Get Better with XRHealth

Episode 440

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Experience, Analyze, Get Better with XRHealth with Eran Orr, Founder, XRHealth & CEO, XRHealth USA Inc transcript powered by Sonix—the best audio to text transcription service

Experience, Analyze, Get Better with XRHealth with Eran Orr, Founder, XRHealth & CEO, XRHealth USA Inc was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best way to convert your audio to text in 2019.

Saul Marquez:
Hey, everybody Saul Marquez here with the Outcomes Rocket. Are you going to HLTH? It’s the largest and most important conference for health innovation. HLTH pronounced health is one of a kind of ecosystem event for the health industry. And they’re on a mission to bring together ,5000 plus senior leaders to solve the most pressing problems facing healthcare today and actualize the most promising opportunities to improve health. They bring together senior leaders from across across payers, providers, employers, investors, fast growing startups, pharma, policymakers, and innovation centers to ask one question. How do we create the future of health? I’ll be there. And I hope to see you there, too. If you use outcomesrocketpodcast150 as the promo code that’s outcomesrocketpodcast150. You’ll get a hundred and fifty dollars off your ticket. Looking forward to seeing you there. Go to hlth.com to sign up. That’s hlth.com. Use that promo code outcomesrocketpodcast150. And I am excited to see you there. I’ll even have a booth recording some podcast live at the event. The MGM in Las Vegas. So, so excited to see you there. Don’t be afraid to say hi and we’re gonna learn a lot there. So hlth.com.

Saul Marquez:
Today I have the privilege of hosting Eran Orr. He is the founder of the XRHealth and the CEO of XRHealth USA. He’s an Ex IAF Executive Officer and holds a B.A. in business management, government and politics, and an MBA in entrepreneurship and innovation. Eran founded XRHealth after experiencing a long rehabilitation process, and he believes that the XR technology which is VR,AR and MR will change healthcare as we know it. XRHealth is a first of its kind Healthcare technology company that helps clinicians better manage their patients care. The specialized extended reality medical platform. XRHealth provides breakthrough medical tools. Via XR content while delivering real time health analytics. They offer a variety of patent pending solutions, from rehabilitation services to cognitive testing, from pain management to psychological assessment tools. XRHealth is a first XR healthcare company in the world that is ISO certified and all its medical applications are FDA authorized. The healthcare industry has numerous challenges. Lack of standardization, high costs, poor monitoring and low preventative care. No one wants to spend time in a hospital or a rehab center when undergoing treatment. However, when a person puts on an XR headset, they’re transported to a place that’s fun and engaging. And Eran’s going to walk us through a little bit more about the technology, how it’s changing care for the better and guiding us through the experience that he’s had with the company. So with that, I want to introduce Eran to the podcast. Welcome.

Eran Orr:
Thanks for having me.

Saul Marquez:
It’s a privilege, my friend. So what is it that got you into the healthcare sector?

Eran Orr:
So I’m a former F-16 pilot. And these are the radio folks. And four years ago, I was diagnosed as suffering from whiplash and gave up this leg and during my own rehab, basically, the idea came about to combine VA and rehab. And that was our first application that we developed, that basically application where somewhat a patients suffering from whiplash or herniated disk and would have had to do the physical therapy exercise in a fun and engaging way and shared the data about the patient performance with their clinician. And today, as you describe earlier, we are basically developing very broad solutions using VR and AR in the healthcare space.

Saul Marquez:
Well, I think it’s you know, firstly, thanks for sharing your story. And, you know, I always wonder when you’re up in the air like that flying at such high speeds. I mean, it’s gonna be traumatic to your body.

Eran Orr:
Without a doubt. Especially F-16, an F-15 or an aircraft that can maneuver up to nine G in there in an instant.

Saul Marquez:
My gosh.

Eran Orr:
And the forces that basically you are experiencing, especially doing dogfights, are very intense and can obviously impact your body. And add to that component the fact that fighter pilots today flying with helmet displays that are relatively heavy. That basically creates the different kind of injuries. One of them is this like whiplashes.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. And things that you have to think about. And so firstly, thanks for sharing your story. I’m glad that you’re doing better. But you’ve got to a point where you are frustrated and. Not willing to accept the care that was available and like great companies begin that way. The other interesting thing is, is that, you know, this simulation technology, something that is already widely adopted in other industries like the airline industry. So I think it’s brilliant. That being a user of the technology, now you’re finding a different application of this. So I’d love to hear from you, Eran, maybe an early success story and how you guys have been able to improve outcomes through your technology.

Eran Orr:
So maybe, maybe before we’ll dive into the numerous success stories I think the listeners maybe I’ll explain in a sentence or two why I believe VR is a game changer for patients and in the healthcare space and then basically to cover three different elements. The first element is that once a patient is anyone, by the way, is putting a VR head, Sudan…

Saul Marquez:
And you know, Eran, its worth kind of making sure folks know. So VR, it’s virtual reality. I just don’t want to leave anybody behind. Like what is VR? Right. We have so many acronyms in healthcare.

Eran Orr:
You’re right. And that’s one of the reasons why some point say, okay, you know what, let’s say rename ourselves to XR. So for the audience that is not familiar with the technology, so VR is the fully immersive headset and experience. It’s the one that you saw people putting on and getting really scared, bouncing into walls. But basically, it’s fully immersive. Right. So you basically strap VR headset and you are in that virtual reality world at that time. That’s VR. AR is basically overlaying virtual objects on top of the real world. The companies that are developing AR glasses today are magically Microsoft with the whole lens. Those are the companies that are developing AR solutions. You have the AR kit, which basically do the same have the same concept just by using your phone. Right. You’re pointing your phone and you see through the camera different kind of about the object. So this is AR. And MR is actually is something in between, some people call AR and MR and using those two incidents to describe the same phenomena.

Saul Marquez:
And one is M.R.? What does the M stand for?

Eran Orr:
Mixed reality.

Saul Marquez:
Mixed reality. Okay, got it.

Eran Orr:
So I think today we are starting to see a solution that is basically using the VR devices and on top in order to have basically to emerge for the VR devices to have six degrees of freedom where you can walk freely and interact with the technology that’s being used today called Inside Out Tracking. It’s basically a camera that is on top of the VR devices. And by doing so, the VR device can know where you are, you know how you are interacting in the fill in the real world. And basically, that’s how they changed individual.

Saul Marquez:
Got it.

Eran Orr:
By using those cameras calls passthrough. Basically, those cameras are now mapping the room, but also showing you the room through a video. That’s something that is now more mixed reality. Either way, for the just to simplify things for the audience, it’s just different kind of immersiveness using virtual reality glasses.

Saul Marquez:
Fascinating. To tell us a little bit more about this right. So I think I appreciate you diving us into that, the detail of that. And you’re about to tell us about why virtual reality is good for patients.

Eran Orr:
So it’s not just good for patients. It’s why I believe VR or those type of extended reality devices will basically change healthcare as you know. Because of the three different reasons. So the first reason is that, again, when someone is putting a VR headset on, they are not in the hospital. They are not into rehab centers. They are not in that unpleasant situations. And that has psychological essence and even elements of brain plasticity. And we are using VR today during chemotherapy, doing dialysis, even in the O.R. And we can see amazing effect of how patients are using VR and that is actually have an impact on their experience and even pain. And by doing so can affect the body. So that’s the power of virtual reality. And basically the ability to hijack the brain to make, made us feel that we are somewhere else. That’s one element that this technology can bring to the table and can create a huge impact. The second element is that was when you put your headset on your basically become an element in a computer generated environment. And once that patient is in, is a matter element in that computer generated environment, we can quantify everything that is do. And because we can control and manipulate the context, the insights, that we can generate far more valuable than any other sensor or device because the only variable is the patient. And that’s why we’re using it today doing physical therapy and cognitive rehab and assessment, including traumatic brain injuries. And with patients with a mess or Alzheimer. And the third element is that location is meaningless. I don’t care where the patient is. It can do everything remotely. And in three weeks from now, we’re launching the first telehealth VR platform where the physician can be anywhere that he wants, the patient can be anywhere that he wants, and the clinician can change the visual environment of the patient and basically manipulating terror session as he please. And I think those three elements would make a huge difference in the healthcare system.

Saul Marquez:
Well, I think it’s it’s a fascinating use case spread that you just share with us. And it’s kind of a no brainer. And there’s a lot of things that you can think about its applications, whether it be physical therapy or mental health. There’s so much you could do with this technology. So love that you gave us the basics there, Eran, give us some examples. How has your technology improved outcomes so far?

Eran Orr:
Let’s start with the first few cases. The first used case and the application that I just described that I’m suffering or just enjoyed it I was suffering from. So we are now concluding the data trial. And by the way, we’re now conducting 19 clinical trials in follow. But in one of the clinical trials, we just proved that VR as a measurement device is basically five times more accurate than anything that is being done today in the physical therapy field. And we have patients that now can patient and clinician that can now quantify their progress in a way that they couldn’t then in any other way. So in the physical therapy today, in order to measure your range of motion, your quality of the movement, your accuracy, basically you’re using tools from the 60’s without any clothes. And it’s basically eyeballing it, eyeballing the outcome. And after one minute of using our cervical spine application, the physician and the patient can get far more detail report about the patient status, including a range of motion, accuracy, response, time, reaction, time. And by doing so now, they can manage the procedures or the protocols and change something if they want to change it. So that’s one used case that we are at least already seeing huge success. Another clinical trial that we had, we just concluded and we published a few weeks ago, one of our application for hot flashes. We are using it as a cognitive behavioral therapy, basically. So we did we conducted clinical trials with 34 patients that suffered from hot flashes after going chemotherapy. The side effects of chemotherapy and they use their application once or twice a day for three weeks. And after those three weeks, we saw 50% reduction of night sweats with 50% reduction of hot flashes and basically better results than any drug in the market with no side effect, which is important.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah.

Eran Orr:
Again, we have other amazing ongoing clinical trials that are showing that the usage of VR could be a replacement for opiates in several locations. Again, I can go on and on, but they are basically endless, endless potential and we’re just scratching the surface.

Saul Marquez:
Well, I’ll tell you what, I’ve been over the last I’d say two years now, probably a year and a half. And I’ve been just kind of playing with the idea of, hey, you know, meditation and VR. And one or two years ago I did a VR. Meditation helped me so much. But I just after just our brief conversation here, I wrote it down after we’re done talking,Eran, I’m going to buy myself a pair of VR goggles and I’m just going to do it.

Eran Orr:
And just the just released three weeks ago, the Oculus Quest Quest. I believe it’s the iPhone 1 of VR. Tt’s mind blowing, 400 bucks. And it’s really an amazing device. Just mind blowing. It’s a stand alone. You don’t need to connect it to any computer, just the Wi-Fi. Six degrees of freedom. Really impressive.

Saul Marquez:
So how about the ones I’ve seen? I’ve seen like… I think it’s like the Oculus Go, what do you think about that one?

Eran Orr:
So the difference between the Oculus Go and the OculusQuest is whether you can walk freely and interact, including your hands. The Oculus Go it’s a great tool for pain management or if you want to watch movies, but basically it’s a stationary VR. So I think if if that’s what you want to do with VR, that’s a great tool. Its a $200 headset. But if you want to have the full experience and see and experience, the full capabilities of VR, Oculus Quest is the solution for you.

Saul Marquez:
Was that right?

Eran Orr:
Yeah.

Saul Marquez:
Well, there we go. I think I know which one I’m buying.

Eran Orr:
Okay.

Saul Marquez:
This is great. Appreciate that input. So as we dive in and consider all the all the benefits here, why is it not being used more widely, Eran?

Eran Orr:
So I think we are doing market education at the moment and we are still facing challenges. But the fact that we need to convince people that VR is not for gamers, the VR industry and still is mostly focusing, focused them on the gaming industry. But we believe that the healthcare sector is much bigger. And the value proposition that the VR can bring to the table for the healthcare market is in a magnitude better than what’s the position that it has on the gaming in the gaming industry? And we are using VR as a certified medical device. We are a medical device company. We have FDA registration for five of our apps at the moment and will register more in the near future. And my biggest challenge today is to convince providers, payers, pharma company, pharma companies that VR is not a game for medicating, too. It’s a medical device that you can utilize that will improve outcomes, reduce costs, provide otherwise better access. But it’s a struggle which is still a small market. But we are I think we are on the right track. But that’s exactly why I’m in New York doing this broadcast. Hopefully people that will listen, we’ll be willing to give it a try. One of the biggest I believe that I can convince people and what VR is all about without them try and get out, that’s one of the biggest challenges that we’re facing and we need more people that just be willing to try it out. What we are seeing is that organizations that start with especially hospitals, by the way, starting with one department and then more physicians want to utilize it in their department for other use case. But we need that first the lever that will take the leap of faith.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah, well, hey, you know, the folks listening to this say Eran are the decision makers. And folks, if you have a problem that maybe traditional methods have not helped. Whether it be in the clinic, in the hospital or here, even a healthcare company that needs to do training, for instance, these are the types of applications that can make a difference. Quit hitting your head against a brick wall. Try something new. And in the show notes, well, we’ll leave a way for you to contact Eran if you want to get something like that started. So I really appreciate that background. It makes a lot of sense. And you convince me Eran. So I’m buying my headset after we’re done.

Eran Orr:
Thanks Saul.

Saul Marquez:
And so what would you say your proudest experience has been to date with the company Eran?

Eran Orr:
That’s a good question. I think that every it’s not a single moment. I think every patient that we are helping. For me, that’s a success. And basically, we’re trying to do to win and to help patients use new technologies that can help them win. So that situation that they’re in. So I think that for me, that’s the win.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. You know, it’s it’s interesting because I mean, I guess, you know, it’s an FDA approved app. So as a consumer, can you get it yourself or do you need for it to be prescribed?

Eran Orr:
So we have different apps. So the physical therapy or the motor function app, those are one of the things that pain management are over-the-counter. But in a way, we are trying to, we decided basically not to go directly to the consumer. We want to work with healthcare organizations to help us and work to get it to educate the market and the patient. So that’s the beginning. We had a dilemma, by the way, whether to go down a…

Saul Marquez:
Sure.

Eran Orr:
Consumer or to work with the healthcare organizations. And we decided to that if we want to actually create change in the industry and try to implement new technologies, we need to work together as an ecosystem.

Saul Marquez:
Yeah. Now, I love it. I love it. And I think it’s the way to go if you want to capture the broader base of users in a market that is financed through third party. So I think ad think it’s a great call, Eran. So folks call the action here is if something in today’s podcast resonated. Check out the show notes for more information outcomesrocket.health and in the search bar type in Eran and you’ll find all of the things that we’ve discussed there. It’s time for the Lightning Round, followed by a book that you recommend to the listeners. Are you ready?

Eran Orr:
Yeah.

Saul Marquez:
All right. What’s the best way to improve healthcare outcomes?

Eran Orr:
Measure, measure, measure, measure. What you can’t measure, you can’t improve.

Saul Marquez:
What’s the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid?

Eran Orr:
Try to promote products that doesn’t have a clear arrow wide.

Saul Marquez:
Eran how do you stay relevant as an organization despite constant change?

Eran Orr:
Move quickly.

Saul Marquez:
And what’s an area of focus that drives everything at your firm?

Eran Orr:
That’s a good question, I think… agile and again, move quickly in and just change things and understand as soon as possible if you need to use it. So think about looking into how you basically adjust.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. And now these next two are more on a personal note. What’s your number one health habit?

Eran Orr:
I’m trying to run. I’m trying to…

Saul Marquez:
You and me both. I’m trying to. That’s why.

Eran Orr:
To be an entrepreneur and maintain a healthy lifestyle, that’s a hard thing to do.

Saul Marquez:
It’s a good challenge. That’s for sure. And what would you say your number one success habit is?

Eran Orr:
I don’t think I have a successful habit, but that’s not something I think, you know. I don’t have a clear, clear invest at this level.

Saul Marquez:
What about this? What like. So you obviously became an F-16 pilot. What quality help to get there? Because that’s not easy.

Eran Orr:
I think that what I’m trying to do constantly challenging my assumptions and try to debrief every time that I’m making a mistake and try not to do the same mistake again.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Love it. It’s a great habit. Appreciate you sharing those two. And on the book side, what book would you recommend to the listeners?

Eran Orr:
So I’m actually reading a lot of startup books lately. I just completed Zero to One by the founder of PayPal, which is thought was very interesting as a founder. Also reading now Pitch Anything, which is also a great book for someone to basically, by the way, could be written for anyone. And another book that I think is amazing book. It’s called The Third Door. And if anyone is interested in entrepreneurship and starting new things, I think The Third Door is amazing.

Saul Marquez:
Love it. Some great recommendations there. Again, folks, go to outcomesrocket.health in the search bar type in Eran. and you’ll find all of our show notes there. Before we conclude, I’d love if you could just share a closing thought, and then where the listeners could continue the conversation with you Eran.

Eran Orr:
As we spoke at the beginning, I think, if we want to move the healthcare sector and industry forward, we need to take a leap of faith. And one of those leap of faith is to try new things. I think one of the challenges that I’m facing and anyone in the healthcare space is facing is it’s very hard to have innovation and the hill to have new innovation deployed in the healthcare space. And we need those people that are the innovators that will help us as a technology company, not just us, but all of any new technology that want to improve the healthcare space to basically could be implemented in the healthcare space. And those are the kind of people that we would love to get in touch with and work together to better understand how we can utilize new technologies to improve patients lives.

Saul Marquez:
A great message, Eran. And what would be the best place for folks to reach out to you?

Eran Orr:
So xr.health. That’s a website. You can just go to a website, but you can reach me and find me on all social media, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, or you can just email me or send their message there or just leave us a note on our website and we’ll get back to you

Saul Marquez:
Outstanding. Hey listen Eran, really appreciate the work that you’re doing, the education you left us with on. Virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality and its potential benefits to the entire health system and patients. So thanks for the education and are looking forward to staying in touch with you.

Eran Orr:
Thanks again for having me. And there’ll be more than happy to come back.

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