Exploring The Most Effective Cancer Therapeutics with Jason Dyer, Vice President of Sales at Concure Oncology

No comments exist
Exploring The Most Effective Cancer Therapeutics with Jason Dyer, Vice President of Sales at Concure Oncology

Exploring The Most Effective Cancer Therapeutics with Jason Dyer, Vice President of Sales at Concure Oncology

Hey Outcomes Rocket friends, thanks for tuning in to the podcast once again. As a leader in health care, you have big ideas great products, a story to tell, and are looking for ways to improve your reach and scale your business. However there's one tiny problem. Health care is tough to navigate and the typical sales cycle is low. That's why you should consider starting your own podcast as part of your sales and marketing strategy. At the Outcomes Rocket, I've been able to reach thousands of people every single month that I wouldn't have otherwise been able to reach if I had not started my podcast. Having this organic reach enables me to get the feedback necessary to create a podcast that delivers value that you are looking for. And the same thing goes if you start a podcast for what you could learn from your customers. The best thing about podcasting in healthcare is that we are currently at the ground level, meaning that the number of people in healthcare listening to podcasts is small but growing rapidly. I put together a free checklist for you to check out the steps on what it takes to create your own podcast. You could find that at outcomesrocket.health/podcast. Check it out today and find a new way to leverage the sales, marketing and outcomes of your business. That's outcomesrocket.health/podcast.

Welcome back once again to the Outcomes Rocket podcast for we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health leaders today have the amazing Jason Dyer. He's Vice President of Sales at Concure Oncology Breast Microseed Incorporated. Jason is a national award winning values-based and results-driven sales leader with a proven track record of exceptional management and sales results. He's a servant leader with over ten years experience with the people first approach that revitalizes organizations are constantly exceeding business objectives. He's an exemplary track record in developing data driven strategic business plans with oversight to effectively forecast and manage long and short term sales cycles. As we all know in this healthcare space it's super important to understand that sales cycle and to understand how to manage that sale cycle because it affects ultimately cash flows and the way that our business does and so it's a pleasure to have Jason on a podcast not just to highlight some of these sales things but also to talk about some of the things that they're working on over at Concure Oncology. So Jason, it's a pleasure to have you on the podcast my friend.

Yeah, thanks for having me and so is all of that great intro I appreciated.

Absolutely, so anything that I left out there Jason on the intro that maybe you want the listeners to know about you?

No, no I would say that you know the only thing is that I've been involved in the in the Breast Care Space for about 10 years. It's really about the only thing, but that was perfect.

Outstanding. And so with this in mind Jason, what is it that got you in the health care sector to begin?

Yeah. Yes. So right out of college I started in the healthcare medical device space with three gentlemen who came from G.E. to a start up medical device company and I worked for them. They sold a computer aided detection software for the liver and the lungs and really worked from them and seeing their passion and excitement for me right out of college really sealed the deal about me wanting to be and stay in the medical space. And that's where I've been and since then that that led me into coming into the Breast Care Space. I've been in for about the last ten years so that's how I got into it.

That's awesome man. And you've been in there for ten years you've had a couple experiences and several different companies with different technologies that help patient care. What would you say Jason is a hot topic tends to be on every medical leaders agenda today? And how are you and your organization approaching it?

Yeah I'd say the hot topic is personalization of of healthcare and the personalization of the health care treatments and not just the treatment but also the pre-treatment before a patient actually gets sick using artificial intelligence machine learning using stuff of that nature to really help a patient before they get sick. And then when they get sick to find the best treatment because we all know there's a lot of treatment a lot of technologies and a lot of things of that nature that are out there that really can benefit the patient. And one thing that our company is doing to help along the lines of personalization of medicine is we offer a one time radiation treatment option for early stage breast cancer patients after they've had surgery. Previous, before this, the patients have to come in for four to six weeks on average coming in once a day for those four to six weeks to get their breast radiation treatment. This takes it down to one day. So for those patients that can't take off work for her Greta for six weeks patients that take care of their children. So you know this is something that can be beneficial. You know and we really have to know and personalize this treatment to the patients that need it.

I think that would be the majority of people getting the treatment right. It's hard to take time away from children time away from work. So I think there's a big opportunity here to really make this better. Can you give an example to the listeners Jason of how this type of therapy has created results by doing things differently?

Yes sir. So the actual the treatment is based on the prostate seed implant that's been developed over 20 or 30 years now and it's based on that. And one thing that we do is we track all of our results and the multicenter registry study. So we're tracking all of our results and all of our data or even trying to take it one step further where we we're tracking why the patients in the positions selected the breast microseed treatment over some of the other radiation treatment options. So by tracking our and we've actually been tracking our results since 2004 when the procedure was just just getting started before FDA clearance or anything of that nature in the United States. We had some very long term data tracking that has really really been beneficial and as we're ramping up and we're just sort of commercializing in the USA about a year ago. So we're really even ramping up the increasing the data that work that we're tracking now, especially in the U.S..

Yes that sounds like oh you guys have been at it since 2004 and now 2018 you're talking about 14 years later. Year ago you guys have started commercializing here and so what would you say one of the biggest call outs for improved comes is with the microseed procedure?

Yes. So really just the improving the outcomes by one it's less time for the patient but to the outcomes are it's less intense for the patient. So the Breast Microseed treatment has less damage to other organs that may be close to the breast for example liver and the lungs. The acute toxicity is much lower with this treatment because it's only one time compared to four to six weeks coming in once a day that can have long term effects 10 15 years down the road they can have cardiac toxicity or develop lung cancer from the radiation treatment. So this treatment is improving outcomes in that respect because it's only one person. And because it can really focus on the area of interest that one time instead of the kind of irradiating the area, day after day and potentially causing harmful effects to other organs.

Jason this is big right because I mean as I sit here chatting with you about this, I've got friends that have had breast cancer and many of the people listening have either had breast cancer or know somebody that has had breast cancer. And when you sit here telling me that one of the side effects of these therapies is a lung cancer from breast cancer. It just becomes very concerning, right. And so to know that there's another alternative out there like what is it that allows your technology to work differently so much more effectively? One treatment versus you know you said three or four weeks every time a day versus like let's just call it 21 treatments like why is it that yours works that way and the others don't?

Yeah because ours is low dose radiation. So ours uses low dose radioactive speed called Palladium. That's the isotope that the treatment uses where the other types of radiation are high dose and the reason some colleges and their team they try to keep it away from the harmful organs, but still there's radiation scattered there's only so much they can do in technology and the software has improved but because ours is using low dose seeds that's really what helps prevent the toxicity.

The interesting part is that it's almost like counterintuitive right because you think well it's lower dose but yet it takes less time. So what exactly is happening here?

So it's lower dose. But what this is doing this is the stage are actually irradiating the area over some time so the actual treatment is one time. The procedure takes about an hour or so and then the seeds work for about 60 days. The patient doesn't feel the seeds or know they're in there but they're slowly irradiating the ear area over the course of 30, 60, 90 days killing the remaining disease.

Got it. I just put it together. I didn't know that the seed stayed in there and they actually did the work. They only as a person showing up with breast cancer, you show up once they put the seeds in and then they continued to work from there versus constantly having to come for this high dose therapy.

Exactly right. So the patient can come in for the one treatment and then they'll return the same day that they're to the normal activity. While the seed do the work. So the patient can be doing their normal activity the next day, return to work with turned up running errands or turn that taking care of her grandkids whatever it may be and the seeds are slowly, slowly working until there are no remaining disease interestingly.

Very cool. Very cool yeah. As you know as we like to evaluate therapies to treat breast cancer it's important and all the options and so Jason I'm glad you're here talking to us about this therapy. What is it called again?

Breast Microseed treatment.

Breast Microseed.

The company is Concur Oncology and the treatment is Breast Microseed.

Breast Microseed treatment. So what's the best place for listeners that are curious to find out more about this?

Probably the best place would be to go to Breast Microseed all one word dot com, breastmicroseed.com and if you'd Google the treatment Breast Microseed treatment, you'll see some very very exciting patient testimonial videos from some of our recent site about breastmicroseed.com is the best way.

Outstanding. So folks check that out, I mean you know you're evaluating options for this treatment or what are your loved ones or even if you're considering other options as part of your treatment arsenal if you're an oncologist. Definitely one to keep your eyes and ears on. So Jason talk to us about a time when you had a setback or failed. Maybe this is on the sales side of things. What did you learn from that and what would you do differently as a result of that?

Yes good question and I think probably the time that pops into my head is in my previous position work in working with a few of the reps that were on my team and we were part of a big idea in mobile hospital system deal and we felt we had the deal locked up. We had the opinion leaders we had everybody saying they wanted thing they wanted our product and technology and this is at my previous position and we move forward and sure enough ended up going with a competitor and it was a it was a big half million dollar deal and we were wondering,"what the heck happened?" Well apparently one of the C-level executives because they are purchasing some other equipment from this manufacturer basically overrode everybody else's decision and made the purchase on his own. That being said, what we learned from the experience was you have to get every stakeholder involved and even if you think that you have everybody still continue, still continue to see who else maybe from the sale sign is involved in the deal because you never know one person can completely change the course of the deal.

Yeah I think that's a great call out and for those listening on the business side of healthcare. It's so important to Jason's thoughts here to address the invisible players. You can always have those people that that you're dealing with day in and day out, but there's those miserable players that you cannot ignore just because they're not part of the negotiation or just because they're not part of that particular transaction doesn't mean they're not involved then Jason painstakingly found that out but walked away with some great learnings that he's now sharing with us so always, always keep them visible player in mind. How about the other side of this coin Jason? What would you say what are your proudest healthcare experiences has been to date?

I would say that last week my previous company actually fund was acquired by a logic for 85 million dollars and they are one of the largest players in the women's healthcare space. If they are the largest one in the women's healthcare space. So I worked at that company for seven years and seeing them get acquired by the biggest and best player in the women's healthcare division. Her logic was that was something I'm very proud because I helped that company grow and they have they had great products that change the game and improve healthcare for women. So seeing her logic now having them is great. I'm very excited about that.

And that's great yeah and you know when you know you took part in the growth of a company with a meaningful purpose and great technology it's a great feeling to see that acquisition.

Exactly. And now we're going be able to get it even more patients which is what it's all about.

That's awesome man. So tell me a little bit of an exciting project or focus that you guys are working there right now and your company right now.

Yes well we're we've had a lot of interest since we've since we brought Breast Microseed treatment to the United States and we've actually had almost so much that we have a backlog of sites that are really interested and want to learn more about the procedure and actually want to go see a procedure because they're so excited about it. So one thing we're doing that we actually have the first class is in October in Chicago, we're doing a training class now. So what we're going to do is we're going to get all the people who are interested in facility including the breast surgeon, the radiation oncologist, and the physicist to all come to a one central location for multiple facilities, and we're going to train them on how to do the treatment and the best Microseed procedure and we're going to have some KU else from all over the U.S. and the world come in and present about the treatment and also just present on radiation therapy for breast and where they where they think it's going. So we think because of a buff in strain program we're now going to be able to train and get more sites up and running faster and to treat more patients which again this is what it's all about. We're really excited about that and this will be our first one. At some point after that we're still hope and finalize the details by the end of this week.

That's awesome. And where can the listeners get more information if they're interested in attending?

Yes they're if they're interested in attending breastmicroseed.com and or they can email me at jason.dyer@concurencology.com. So either one breast microseed and or email me directly and I'm more than happy to give the listeners any more information.

That's beautiful. And folks I'll make sure to include both of those contact points the website as well as Jason's email address. So don't go away I'll be sharing that with you here and that the end of the podcast. So let's pretend Jason you and I are building a medical leadership course some what it takes to be successful in the business of healthcare. It's the one on one of Jason Dyer. So we are going to write out a syllabus with these four lightning round questions followed by a book that you recommend to the listeners. You ready?

Sounds good let's go.

All right. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes?

I think the best way to improve healthcare outcomes is by providing more people access new technologies and new treatment options including in rural areas. So just getting more people is exciting options that are out there.

What's the biggest mistake or a pitfall to avoid?

From a healthcare company standpoint not looking at all aspects in regards to starting a new company. And what I mean by that is not looking at all the regulatory aspects all the clinical data that you may need not looking at the funding not looking at the product development just if you're missing any of these aspects in regards to launching a new product or service and or company. It can be very very challenging. So just making sure that you have all of these pieces in place.

Of that, how do you stay relevant despite constant change?

I think you make sure you have your pulse on the market and you have the 3P's, and you're constantly talking of the 3P's. The 3P's are the patient, the provider, and the payers. The same thing, if you're not in touch with them and you're missing feedback from one of them it will be a very challenging time.

What's one area of focus that should drive everything in a health care organization?

Having a common strategy, an end goal or an objective. Everybody rowing the boat per se in the right direction is the very very key. So you have people rolling in the wrong direction. It's not going to work out.

Counterproductive. And so Jason mode you say your favorite book that you'd like to recommend to the listeners is?

A favorite book, I'd say Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill. I love that book.

It's a great one. Love that. Folks, this interview, all the links and things that we've discussed along with the transcript you could find all of that just go to outcomesrocket.health/concure and you'll be able to find all that there along with the email that Jason provided. Jason here getting to the end, I love if you could just share closing thought and then the best place again for the listeners to know where to get in touch with you.

Yeah sure. So the closing thought that I'd say for healthcare companies and for physicians providers in general, just to make sure you understand the patient's need and you take care of the patient and try to constantly improve and personalized treatments for the patients because that's where it seems things are going you know whether through genetic testing or the moment testing or artificial intelligence or the all the different things that are out there and continue to change the game of personalization for healthcare for the patient is where it's going and what we need to be thinking about.

And what would you say the best place for listeners to get in touch with you. Just as a recap.

Yeah. Yes. Best place to get in touch with me my email is jason.dyer@concureoncology.com and our website is breastmicroseed.com. Those are the best, best two ways possibly.

Outstanding Jason. Hey this has been great I really appreciate you sharing this treatment. I mean frankly I don't even know it was available, so listeners I'm sure you will probably take interest in the discussion. Don't worry you can always rewind and listen to the things that we discussed here, just hit that rewind button or check out the show notes at outcomesrocket.health/concure . So once again Jason thanks again for your time and looking forward to seeing where you guys take this technology to benefit patients.

Yeah thanks. Thanks very much for having me on.

Hey Outcomes Rocket friends, thanks for tuning in to the podcast once again. As a leader in health care, you have big ideas great products, a story to tell, and are looking for ways to improve your reach and scale your business. However there's one tiny problem. Health care is tough to navigate and the typical sales cycle is low. That's why you should consider starting your own podcast as part of your sales and marketing strategy. At the Outcomes Rocket, I've been able to reach thousands of people every single month that I wouldn't have otherwise been able to reach if I had not started my podcast. Having this organic reach enables me to get the feedback necessary to create a podcast that delivers value that you are looking for. And the same thing goes if you start a podcast for what you could learn from your customers. The best thing about podcasting in healthcare is that we are currently at the ground level, meaning that the number of people in healthcare listening to podcasts is small but growing rapidly. I put together a free checklist for you to check out the steps on what it takes to create your own podcast. You could find that at outcomesrocket.health/podcast. Check it out today and find a new way to leverage the sales, marketing and outcomes of your business. That's outcomesrocket.health/podcast.

Automatically convert audio to text with Sonix

 


Recommended Book:

Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

Best Way to Contact Jason:

jason.dyer@concureoncology.com

Mentioned Link:

http://www.breastmicroseed.com/

Check out this Link:

https://outcomesrocket.health/podcast

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *