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Data Integration for Healthcare and Marketing
Episode

Adam Rosenberg, Director of Marketing at Arrive Health

Data Integration for Healthcare and Marketing

Getting the right information to the right place at the right time, that’s a challenge for marketers

 

In this episode of Marketing Mondays, we are joined by Adam Rosenberg, Senior Director of Marketing for Arrive Health. He talks about Arrive Health, previously known as RxRevu, it’s rebranding, and how he is leading its marketing strategies. He explains how Arrive Health works with health systems and PMBs to deliver data on prescription price transparency, medical benefits, and prior authorizations among many others to get patients the most affordable care. He dives into the different ways he’s leading the marketing strategy for Arrive’s positioning, including conferences, social media advertising, 1-to-1 marketing, and integrating meaningful data.

 

Tune in to this episode to learn about where healthcare marketing is headed and how Adam Rosenberg applies it at Arrive Health!

Data Integration for Healthcare and Marketing

About Adam Rosenberg:

Adam Rosenberg is Director of Marketing at Arrive Health, the industry leader in delivering patient-specific cost and coverage information to the point of care. In this role, he focuses on partner growth, brand awareness, and sales enablement. By collaborating with commercial, product, operations, and leadership teams, he provides strategic guidance while delivering meaningful results.

 

Adam has managed company rebranding efforts like website development, logo/imagery creation, naming, messaging, and more. He has led demand generation through conferences, webinars, thought leadership, inbound/outbound, and referral campaigns. He has directed brand awareness in digital advertising, social media, PR, website, sponsorships, and email marketing. He has supervised meaningful projects like messaging/positioning, content creation, people management, and reporting to leadership.

 

Throughout his career, Adam has played an instrumental role in leading marketing initiatives to engage hospitals, health systems, health plans, PBMs, and EHR vendors. He has a passion for improving our broken healthcare system and leverages strategic thinking, creativity, and innovation to drive change.

 

Adam is involved in numerous marketing forums and events throughout the year. Before Arrive Health, he was supporting marketing teams at Welltok (now Virgin Pulse) and the Advisory Board Company (now Optum).

 

MarketingMondays_Adam Rosenberg: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

MarketingMondays_Adam Rosenberg: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Andreea Borcea:
Welcome to the Marketing Mondays podcast, where we explore how we can make your offerings stand out in the health and wellness space. Through conversations with thought leaders and innovators in health and wellness marketing, we’ll discuss marketing best practices, case studies, and innovative ideas to help scale your business and grow revenues with impact. I’m excited to be your host. My name is Andreea Borcea. I’m a fractional CMO and owner of the Dia Creative Marketing Agency.

Andreea Borcea:
Hey everyone! And welcome back to another episode of Marketing Mondays. I’m your host, Andreea Borcea, CMO of Dia Creative, and I’m excited to bring you Adam Rosenberg, Senior Director of Marketing for Arrive Health.

Adam Rosenberg:
Pleasure to meet you.

Andreea Borcea:
Thanks for coming on the podcast. Yeah, I’m super excited. So let’s start off by really simple like what is Arrive Health? Who’s your target market and how do you fit into the giant healthcare landscape?

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, yeah. So Arrive Health is a reimagined company. The company started about ten years ago as RxRevu, and we were really a prescription price transparency vendor. So we were bringing coverage and cost information from PBMs directly to EHR workflows. Across the last couple of years, we realized there’s so much more complexity and so much more we can do beyond the pharmacy side of the house and the pharmacy benefits. So we’ve expanded into medical benefits and prior authorization and all of these different areas, and knew that we needed to not only change the name of the company but reimagine what we were capable of. So today we work with health plans, PBMs of all sizes, they provide us with their data, and we deliver that data through to provide workflows, typically that’s within the EHR, and what that allows for is better conversations with patients about costs, lower cost alternatives, restrictions, and really just care planning in general. So our mission is to clear the way for better health and get patients on the most affordable care every time.

Andreea Borcea:
I love that, I’m wondering if you found, as you were expanding your offering, was it more that people were appreciative of the transparency you were originally offering? Or did you see… What a lot of people see is that there’s like an efficiency problem in healthcare and understanding information.

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, it really is both. So the transparency is really where the origin of the company started. So we just want to get the information to the right place at the right time. Both patients and providers just didn’t have the information on what drugs were covered, what care was covered under their insurance plan. So if I was to go into a doctor, they might prescribe a medication without knowing if it was covered, I would end up going to the pharmacy and that drug may cost me $600 dollars that month. If my doctor had information about what was covered under my specific insurance plan at that moment in time and view the alternatives, they would be able to prescribe or order the lower-cost option. So the transparency is really critically important. The other part of your question is just about kind of simplifying the complex and reducing friction, and we are trying to do that as well. So we have a clinical team on staff, primarily pharmacists and nurses, and they are making sure that the data we send from the PBMs and health plans is clinically relevant and meaningful for the doctors. So there’s a lot of noise that has been within the EHR and we’re trying to reduce that. So we’re not necessarily showing lower-cost alternatives for 90 days of an antibiotic. That is not a medication that a doctor would ever want to prescribe, that would be noise in the EHR. So it really is both transparency and reducing friction and noise.

Andreea Borcea:
Do you feel like with your current offering that it would have been something you could have introduced natively, or did it help that you had already built all these relationships with your initial offering?

Adam Rosenberg:
It’s a really interesting question. So many years ago, the initial company vision was to build a standalone app and help with clinical decision support, help doctors and nurses and care teams choose the best option for their patients. What we quickly realized with some of our partners, primarily with UC Health out in Colorado, they’re one of our key innovation partners, and we were working on this initiative with them. We found out that to no one’s surprise, looking back, doctors dislike friction, just like leaving their workflow, so we knew we needed to be integrated within the EHR. The great news is we have really strong relationships with our EHR partners, so we currently work with Athena Health, Cerner, and with Epic, and we’re fully integrated into those workflows. So the provider does not need to leave their EHR window, whether that’s via a browser or in its own application, they don’t need to leave that application to view the cost and coverage information. Everything is seamless and we’re using fire APIs to make sure that the data is real-time and accurate and presented within the workflow.

Andreea Borcea:
Yeah, that’s really smart. I’m wondering if almost that’s the best tactic for any company that’s trying to improve EHR functionality, right? It’s like you just start with one little offering that seems like a nice sweet carrot and they jump in and then you’re like, By the way, here’s all this other data that we can put in and we’re already connected and we’re already here, so.

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, there are a number, yeah, there’s a lot of opportunity for us to expand and that’s exactly what we’ve been doing. We work with our EHR partners, historically, we worked with them on the prescription price transparency side, and we’re expanding into other medical benefits, prior authorization, CAPs, and care alerts. So once we have the connection to the PBM data, we can turn on additional pipelines of data for the health plan information.

Andreea Borcea:
Nice, with, so, then from a marketing perspective, are you doing more for anyone new that isn’t working with you yet? Are you doing more like cold outreach directly or are you leveraging Epic, etc, Athena, to let their customers know that you are an available add-on?

Adam Rosenberg:
It’s a really great question and it does get a little bit complex, so I’ll take it step by step. We have enterprise-level agreements with certain EHRs. So for Cerner and Athena Health, we make our tool available to any of their users so their users can view cost and coverage information within the workflow. Epic is so unique and large that while we have a partnership with them, they’ve given us the opportunity to turn on within any of their health system clients. So we need to go health system by health system to partner with the health system and then activate our solution within their EHR. So a little different based on the EHR partner, whether or not we’re visible within the workflow.

Andreea Borcea:
Interesting, So with these individual health systems, how do you approach that? How do you figure out like what, how do I open the door? How do I know the right marketing messaging that’s going to work? Are you finding it’s similar for all these health systems or do you have to build unique for each health system?

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, it’s been really interesting. So across the last three years, as we’ve developed our brand and transitioned to kind of broader price transparency, coverage information, and presenting it within the workflow, we’ve really needed to distill our messaging for the various audiences that that applies to. We’ll always start with or have always started with prescription price transparency, it’s the most simple for people to understand, there’s clear value. A lot of health systems have relationships with in-house pharmacies or PBMs or payers, so that area is the most straightforward for us. And we have messaging specifically for chief pharmacy officers, directors of pharmacy, those who oversee kind of the pharmacy workflow and operations. That being said, the other people typically get involved because there’s installation within the EHR, so often a CIO is involved, and then often someone over the medical informatics or just the medical team, in general, is involved because there is a training component. We display the cost and coverage information automatically, but there are one or two additional clicks that are needed to switch the medication from a high-cost option to a low-cost option. So there needs to be buy-in from a lot of different stakeholders to make sure we’re kind of pushing our pursuits across the finish line and making sure we can activate the solution successfully.

Andreea Borcea:
Definitely, when you’re having to do any sort of more complex buy-in before you can get sign-off, are you finding that you have like an internal champion within that health system that helps you make those connections? Or is it still mostly the burden on your sales and marketing team?

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, we typically have a specific kind of champion at the health system that we will try to work closely with. We’ll kind of leverage them as our main point of contact to distribute any content, any materials, any value propositions that we have, and the benefit to their team specifically. What we’re trying to move toward is involving more people who might be involved in the buying committee earlier in the journey. So if we know our past 20 clients who have signed on, we’ve always needed sign-on from a CIO, let’s bring the CIO into the conversation early on and provide them with the flyer, the one-pager, maybe give them a recording of the pitch, and walk them through the implementation process just to ease the decision at the end of the day. Because what we’re, what has been seen across the industry is you might have a buy-in, there’s huge, there’s really a lot of excitement around it, but then when they get to the decision-making table with ten other people, you haven’t gotten everyone sign off and the deal might not go through. So we’re really trying to bring those other people in earlier on so that we can win more deals.

Andreea Borcea:
And ideally, shorten the sales cycle too, right? Instead of having to start all over again once you get the new committee.

Adam Rosenberg:
Exactly, yeah.

Andreea Borcea:
That’s funny, so it sounds like a lot of your marketing process then is more of like a sales support process. Are you using any more traditional marketing channels like social media, email marketing? I don’t know, even website conversion optimization.

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, it’s a really great question and really applicable right now. As I mentioned, we transitioned from our RxRevu to Arrive Health this year, and I think what that has required of the marketing team is to support sales, really make sure the content is in a good spot, make sure our messaging is really aligned. That doesn’t mean that we’ve forgotten about the general marketing tactics that everyone is familiar with. So we attend a good number of conferences every single year, both higher-level CEO level conferences, but also regional conferences have been really beneficial. But yes, we’re doing organic, social media, paid advertising on LinkedIn, Google. We’re also doing email marketing, we use Salesforce and Pardot for that, and a number of other things to just make sure our brand is out there and people are familiar with us. I always kind of go back to something I heard, a decade ago at this point, it takes seven to whatever, fifteen times for someone to see your brand or to, see a message before they really engage. So we don’t want to just put our brand out there and set it and forget it, we want to people, we want to be in people’s inboxes, be where they are in terms of healthcare, news sites, and advertising, but then the sales team can really drive the opportunity home.

Andreea Borcea:
Right, you become something that’s just inherently in their brain and they don’t know how. And so when your sales team reach us, like, oh yeah, I’ve heard of a … let’s talk. Have there been any interesting surprises that you’ve seen that actually worked really well across those marketing channels? Something that really stood out?

Adam Rosenberg:
So LinkedIn advertising has been really interesting across the last couple of months. We redesigned all of our ad assets, so new colors, new logo, new branding, new messaging, and we added more specific targeting into LinkedIn advertising. So like I mentioned before, we have the supply side of our network, which is the health plans and PBMs, and the demand side, which is our health systems and EHR partners. We’ve added in specific accounts that we want to send these ads to. So we’re still measuring how many clicks we get, how many impressions we get, and how many form fills we get. But just the overall engagement from these specific accounts is really interesting. And what the big topic is that I’ve heard this year and across the last couple of years in healthcare marketing is intent data and knowing which accounts are important to reach out to at a specific time, and LinkedIn can be a huge part of that because we know a specific health system saw our ad 500 times and 12 people clicked, right? So we know exactly that account could be high-priority for our sales team, so we’re leveraging LinkedIn not only to get our message out there but also as a signal for intent data.

Andreea Borcea:
That’s super cool, I love that healthcare marketing is getting to the point where we can finally start using that kind of help marketing data as well as like e-commerce companies have been using it for the last fifteen years, right? So when you’re doing that, then, are you also like mapping out the user journey in the sense of like marketing touchpoints? So, you know, yeah, like LinkedIn ads, now that you can see specifically that company. Like does that fall pretty early on in their journey with you, or do you just kind of keep hitting them even while you’re like in committees later on?

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, so we’re very much in the early stages of building out the alignment, between marketing and sales in regards to the journey that a prospect might go through. So we talked about content a little bit earlier. My plan for the rest of this year, especially because we’ve rebranded everything, we kind of have to redesign a lot, it’s to make sure that there is content specific to each persona at every stage of the sales process or opportunity journey. So a pure prospect that we’ve never spoken with, they’ll be seeing our ads, they’ll be getting our emails. Hopefully, can see us, they can see us at conferences, things like that. And as people engage, as people click, come to our site, we need more specific content for those personas, and it could be blogs, webinars, infographics, things like that, and as you’re probably aware, demos and other sorts of content as you get further down the funnel. So we’re still building out that process of who should be receiving what and when, but we’re definitely on our journey there.

Andreea Borcea:
That’s going to be a lot of fun to dig into with all that analytics. So conferences now are coming back and they’re coming back strong, from what I can tell. Are you, have you done anything interesting there to grab people’s attention? Because, you know, a lot more people are coming out, there’s a lot more booths than there used to be.

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, conferences comes up in a lot of our conversations internally. We’re really trying to figure out the best approach. We’ve been involved just this year in some larger events like HIMSS and ViVE and HLTH, where there’s tens of thousands of people and we’re trying to make a splash, and we’ve been involved in much smaller events where it’s a very targeted, focused group of audience members. We have personally found value in events that are very targeted in topic or group, so we’re involved in a pharmacy collaborative and there’s maybe only 20 or 30 attendees, but we have one, we can get one-on-one time with all. So that type of interaction is incredibly valuable for our commercial team. Regional events we’re starting to look into as well. If you know, there’s three or five states where there’s kind of a central grouping of hospitals, or EHR vendors, or plans even, we can try and attend those to get better penetration in that area. I think that the key to all of the conferences that we’ve been to is do your homework. Do whatever you can to get the registration list. Without it, you’re kind of just flailing about trying to meet with people. I know a lot of salespeople are social, but you don’t have any idea who might be there. So some of the larger conferences like HIMSS or HLTH, where we get, we’re a sponsor, so we get the registration list, we at least know which accounts and which contacts we want to try and meet with.

Andreea Borcea:
That makes such a difference. It does sound like you make a lot more impact in getting involved in lots of micro-communities rather than the macro, and the macro is more of like you still have to hunt down to a smaller grouping.

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, I think micro marketing it’s, that’s funny you bring that up, it’s a term that came up in a call I had recently about specific accounts and marketing to one-on-one accounts at a specific moment in time. Maybe an account is in, a health system is in the news for a particular reason, you reach out to them specifically that day, so I consider that micro marketing or 1-to-1 marketing. I kind of think the larger events are a great brand awareness play. Your brand could get in front of 5000 people, but you’re never certain those 5000 people are the right person or they’re going to remember your name or your brand or know who to go to or know exactly what you do. We’ve had digital signage at events. We’ve put bags in the, or put items in the giveaway bags. We’ve done all sorts of things, but it’s really hard to quantify the return on those things. So we’re thinking of pulling back in that area a little bit, trying to get a much more relationship-driven approach to our events. So we know who’s going to be there, we have goals of who we want to meet with and we can really measure that after the conference is over.

Andreea Borcea:
Yeah, conversations are so much more powerful than tchotchkes, although I’ll admit that I absolutely love getting like little keychains and T-shirts and things.

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, I do have some things. I have some things on my desk. I have, someone gave me a light bulb, which is cool, like a wi-fi light bulb. I have a lunchbox. There’s lots of cool things you can give out, but again, I. You know, if it really makes me want to buy or partner with them.

Andreea Borcea:
You’re just like, they’re, you know, you’re just a cool thing that’s sitting on my desk for a little while.

Adam Rosenberg:
Until I give it away to someone else.

Andreea Borcea:
Yeah, exactly. So overall, where do you see healthcare marketing going? Do you see any major changes and shifts in the next 2 to 5 years? Ten years, maybe?

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, so I attended an ABM, a B2B ABM conference a couple of weeks ago, and it was not healthcare specific, it was all industries, and it was fascinating. The things that other industries are able to do in terms of targeting and leveraging intent data and really getting in front of the right audience at the right time, that really excites me, and, but I think healthcare lags a little bit. I mean, there’s a lot of complexities in healthcare, as everyone knows, but I think getting in front of a buying committee at a hospital or a health system or a health plan, it’s just incredibly difficult. A health system could have 10,000 employees and five matter. And a lot of these ABM companies say that they can get your ads in front of the right people or get your messaging in front of the right people, and I think some healthcare organizations have been able to be successful with them, but I think there’s going to be this evolution over the next couple of years where we’re truly able to advertise to the right people, get all of the right people in the buying committee involved in the conversation sooner, and really progress opportunities through the pipeline in a more strategic way instead of, healthcare is and will always be relationship-driven, but you can’t just rely on a relationship with one person. You need to involve the group and we need to figure out how to do that a little bit more efficiently.

Andreea Borcea:
Yeah, and even prep your internal champion to be more successful because you’ve integrated better and you’ve already had a couple touch points. Yeah, that, I think better integration of the data, honestly, I mean, in healthcare, better integration of the data is what we’re all striving for anyway with our solutions.

Adam Rosenberg:
Exactly.

Andreea Borcea:
So might as well bring that into the marketing. Well, cool. Adam, that is awesome. I had a lot of fun talking, if there’s any, where can people find more information about Arrive Health?

Adam Rosenberg:
Yeah, so ArriveHealth.com is the website, newly designed website, So check it out. And we’re also on LinkedIn so you can follow us there. Just search for Arrive Health, formerly RxRevu.

Andreea Borcea:
Well, thanks so much Adam for being on Marketing Mondays. I’m your host, Andreea Borcea, and thanks so much, that’s that!

Adam Rosenberg:
Thank you so much, that was awesome.

Andreea Borcea:
Thanks again for listening to Marketing Mondays. If you have any marketing questions at all, feel free to reach out to me directly at DiaCreative.com. That’s D I A Creative.com.

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Things You’ll Learn:

  • Arrive Health, previously RxRevu is a company that works with health systems and PMBs to deliver data to physicians within EHRs that allows for better conversations with patients about lower costs and alternatives, restrictions, and care planning in general.
  • Arrive Health is fully integrated and has strong relationships with EHRs like Athena Health, Cerner, and Epic.
  • It takes between seven to fifteen times for someone to see a brand or a message before they engage with it.
  • LinkedIn advertising can collect intent data and allow you to know which accounts are important to reaching out to at a specific time.
  • Make sure that there is content specific to each persona at every stage of the sales process or opportunity journey.
  • Before going to conferences, do whatever you can to get the registration list, so you can know which accounts and contacts to try to meet.

Resources:

  • Connect and follow Adam Rosenberg on LinkedIn.
  • Follow Arrive Health on LinkedIn.
  • Discover the Arrive Health Website.
  • Visit the Día Creative Website for solutions to any of your marketing needs.